(Poem Of Reality) Too The Trees (A Soldiers Prayer Of Survival On The Battlefield)

TOO THE TREES

 

To the trees my Captain yells

Across this open field of green

Flowers blooming from spring rains

Will they be the last thing I smell or see

Are there Cross Hairs locked upon my brain

Will a gray pill be the last thing that I feel

 

 

All those trees, are those just branches looking at me

Or will this effort to reach them be the death of me

Leaving my bones to rot among the flowers in this field

Do I run as fast as I can with my breath held in prayer

Or do I play the coward using my brothers as a shield

Letting them taste first the fiery breath of Hell’s lead

 

 

If in the trees our enemy is waiting there for you and me to kill

When to the trees the Captain yells do we jump up and run like hell

Should we low crawl chins dug into the mud hoping were not shelled

Will we be a fool if we do stand up and charge toward the row of trees

Or will we die in this field of green if we raise our head above the weeds

Life is a war, every breath is a chance it will be the last one we breathe

 

 

To the trees like the charge ordered by General Robert E Lee

Like life itself no matter what we do, doubting itself is a gamble

Do we run in hope or do we cower in fear, do we die here, or there

This field to me so beautiful, there are worse places to be my grave

If we just cower here in the mud and never step out onto life’s field

We know we will never get out of this life alive, so what do we do

 

 

Hold your breath and pray, now step into this field of life or death

If in life we choose to never seek the thrills, then a cowards life we live

The fields of life we will not cross, nor the flowers will we ever smell

If we lived our life without the thrills, can we truly say we ever lived

To the trees child, to the trees, up off your ass and face your trees

Where to See the Tallest Trees in the World

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

Where to See the Tallest Trees in the World

Have you ever been to a new place where you feel lost and in awe? Visiting Redwood National Park in Northern California is an opportunity to be among trees that existed during the time of Christ. Redwood National Park is known worldwide as the home of the tallest trees in the world, and it attracts hundreds of thousands of visitors yearly. The park is open to tourists year-round, and entrance is free. A visit to the park convinces you that the reserve offers more than trees. Find out what makes Redwood National Park a unique place and how to make your stay memorable.

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About Redwood National Park

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Located along the Northern California coast, Redwood became a national park in October 1968. The park sits on 131,983 acres of land with about 5,939 acres under water. Redwood is home to the tallest trees on Earth, with average heights of 300 feet. And you don’t get that tall in a short period of time: The average age of the redwood trees is between 500-700 years, with a few documented to be 2,000 years old. The park has about 380 different campsites and four campgrounds available for tourists, with three of the four campgrounds open all year.

Famous for its redwood trees, Redwood National Park also has Sitka Spruce trees, salmonberries, and the red alders that line the entire coastal region. The redwood trees do not cover the entire coastal area because of its intolerance to the drying effect of the coastal salt. This gives way to the Sitka Spruce trees lining most of the coastal areas. The national park is the home to over 40 different mammals and over 400 bird species. Redwood Park has many beaches and numerous trails that provide visitors with lots of opportunities for outdoor adventures.

How to Get to Redwood National Park

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If traveling by air, the nearest large airports to Redwood National Park are in Sacramento and San Francisco. You can connect a flight to any of the adjacent cities of Santa Rosa, McKinleyville, or Crescent City.

Traveling by road remains the loveliest way to get to the Redwood National Park. If you are coming from either the north or south, follow U.S. Highway 101. If driving from the northeast, enter on U.S. Highway 199.

Top Attraction Sites and Outdoor Activities

Credit: milehightraveler / iStock

This park is home to the largest living coastal redwood tree, which stands 379.1 feet and was discovered in August 2006. Named the Hyperion, meaning The High One, it lives in a remote part of the park. Naturalist Steve Sillett pegs the redwood at a young 600 years of age, which is about 20 in human years. While you might not have the time to cover all the beautiful places in Redwood National Park during your stay, this selection is worth your attention:

  • Tall Trees Groove
  • Lady Bird Johnson Grove Trail
  • Fern Canyon
  • Endert’s Beach
  • Crescent Beach
  • Klamath River
  • Battery Point Lighthouse and Museum
  • Newton B. Drury Scenic Parkway
  • Drive-Thru Tree Park
  • Coastal Drive

Redwood National Park provides tourists the perfect opportunity to engage in outdoor activities. These include camping, hiking tours, bicycling, wildlife viewing, horseback riding, and guided kayaking. For the more serene among us, the many trails and beaches in and around the Redwoods, coupled with the large expanse of land, make for a striking scenic walk.

Accommodations

Credit: Konoplytska / iStock

There is no accommodation facility at Redwood apart from the four camping grounds. It would be best to make adequate provisions for your stay. Securing accommodations around the park can be challenging, especially during the summer time. There are many hotels, cabins, motels, and lodges around the park if you choose not to camp. It is advisable to book your lodging months ahead of your planned visit. If you choose to camp, be sure you get to the park during the daytime before it closes for the evening. In addition, the camping fees cover the permits for backcountry camping.

What to Bring Along

Credit: haveseen / iStock

Regardless of the time of the year, according to National Park Service, it is advisable you pack clothes ideal for the rainy season. Bring hiking boots or sturdy waterproof shoes and rain gear. If you plan to visit during the winter, bring hats and dress in warm layers.

Some Frequently Asked Questions About Redwood National Park

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Are There Restaurants Within the Park?

There are no restaurant or meal facilities within the park. You can purchase food from nearby communities.

May I Bring My Pets?

Yes, pets are allowed, though they have limited access to areas within the park. Contact the park for more details.

What is the Weather Like at Redwood Park?

Due to the influence of the Pacific Ocean, the average temperature at the National Park is between 40F to 60F.

Redwood National Park is a place filled with interesting and memorable scenery. To get the most from your visit, plan ahead and prepare to be impressed with nature’s grandeur.

Ethiopian Scientist Believe “First Human” Lucy Died From Falling Out Of A Tree

(This article is courtesy of the Addis Ababa News Paper: The Ethiopia Herald)

Scientists say Lucy died after arboreal accident

Texas and Addis Ababa University researchers said that the ancient human ancestor Lucy probably died after falling from a tree.

Indicating that a number of researches have been conducted for years, Co-author and Addis Ababa University Paleoenviromentalist and Geoscintists Dr. Mulugeta Feseha. said that questions how 40 per cent of Lucy’s fossils were found and was Lucy living on tree or earth were some which have not yet been given response for 42 years.

The combined interpretation from Lucy’s fossils, CT scan reconstructions and ancient environment interpretation from geological information support to conclude that Lucy died falling from a tall tree, and this was followed by rapid brutal in riverside crevasse splay sandstone sediments.

“It is ironic that the fossil at the center of a debate about the role of arborealism in human evolution likely died from injuries suffered from a fall out of a tree,”said Lead Author Anthropologist and Geographical Professor John Kappelman Austin University.

The fact that 40 per cent of Lucy’s remains are preserved and Lucy being discovered from ancient riverine environment tells that the ancient environment of Lucy needs a close scrutiny to hypothesize how Lucy was preserved,” Dr. Mulugeta said.

Lucy was both terrestrial and arboreal, features that permitted her to move efficiently on the ground may have compromised her ability to climb trees, predisposing her specious to more frequent falls. Using fracture patterns when present, future research may tell a more complete story of how ancient species lived and died, it was learnt.

The Authority for Research and Conservation of Cultural Heritage (ARCCH) Director General Yonas Desta said that his office has been providing unreserved support for researchers who are trying to conduct research and come up with new findings.

WRITTEN BY GIRMACHEW GASHAW

(Poem Of Reality) Too The Trees (A Soldiers Prayer Of Survival On The Battlefield)

TOO THE TREES

 

To the trees my Captain yells

Across this open field of green

Flowers blooming from spring rains

Will they be the last thing I smell or see

Are there Cross Hairs locked upon my brain

Will a gray pill be the last thing that I feel

 

 

All those trees, are those just branches looking at me

Or will this effort to reach them be the death of me

Leaving my bones to rot among the flowers in this field

Do I run as fast as I can with my breath held in prayer

Or do I play the coward using my brothers as a shield

Letting them taste first the fiery breath of Hell’s lead

 

 

If in the trees our enemy is waiting there for you and me to kill

When to the trees the Captain yells do we jump up and run like hell

Should we low crawl chins dug into the mud hoping were not shelled

Will we be a fool if we do stand up and charge toward the row of trees

Or will we die in this field of green if we raise our head above the weeds

Life is a war, every breath is a chance it will be the last one we breathe

 

 

To the trees like the charge ordered by General Robert E Lee

Like life itself no matter what we do, doubting itself is a gamble

Do we run in hope or do we cower in fear, do we die here, or there

This field to me so beautiful, there are worse places to be my grave

If we just cower here in the mud and never step out onto life’s field

We know we will never get out of this life alive, so what do we do

 

 

Hold your breath and pray, now step into this field of life or death

If in life we choose to never seek the thrills, then a cowards life we live

The fields of life we will not cross, nor the flowers will we ever smell

If we lived our life without the thrills, can we truly say we ever lived

To the trees child, to the trees, up off your ass and face your trees

Ethiopian Scientist Believe “First Human” Lucy Died From Falling Out Of A Tree

(This article is courtesy of the Addis Ababa News Paper: The Ethiopia Herald)

Scientists say Lucy died after arboreal accident

31 Aug 2016

Texas and Addis Ababa University researchers said that the ancient human ancestor Lucy probably died after falling from a tree.

Indicating that a number of researches have been conducted for years, Co-author and Addis Ababa University Paleoenviromentalist and Geoscintists Dr. Mulugeta Feseha. said that questions how 40 per cent of Lucy’s fossils were found and was Lucy living on tree or earth were some which have not yet been given response for 42 years.

The combined interpretation from Lucy’s fossils, CT scan reconstructions and ancient environment interpretation from geological information support to conclude that Lucy died falling from a tall tree, and this was followed by rapid brutal in riverside crevasse splay sandstone sediments.

“It is ironic that the fossil at the center of a debate about the role of arborealism in human evolution likely died from injuries suffered from a fall out of a tree,”said Lead Author Anthropologist and Geographical Professor John Kappelman Austin University.

The fact that 40 per cent of Lucy’s remains are preserved and Lucy being discovered from ancient riverine environment tells that the ancient environment of Lucy needs a close scrutiny to hypothesize how Lucy was preserved,” Dr. Mulugeta said.

Lucy was both terrestrial and arboreal, features that permitted her to move efficiently on the ground may have compromised her ability to climb trees, predisposing her specious to more frequent falls. Using fracture patterns when present, future research may tell a more complete story of how ancient species lived and died, it was learnt.

The Authority for Research and Conservation of Cultural Heritage (ARCCH) Director General Yonas Desta said that his office has been providing unreserved support for researchers who are trying to conduct research and come up with new findings.

WRITTEN BY GIRMACHEW GASHAW

(Poem Of Reality) Too The Trees (A Soldiers Prayer Of Survival On The Battlefield)

TOO THE TREES

 

To the trees my Captain yells

Across this open field of green

Flowers blooming from spring rains

Will they be the last thing I smell or see

Are there Cross Hairs locked upon my brain

Will a gray pill be the last thing that I feel

 

 

All those trees, are those just branches looking at me

Or will this effort to reach them be the death of me

Leaving my bones to rot among the flowers in this field

Do I run as fast as I can with my breath held in prayer

Or do I play the coward using my brothers as a shield

Letting them taste first the fiery breath of Hell’s lead

 

 

If in the trees our enemy is waiting there for you and me to kill

When to the trees the Captain yells do we jump up and run like hell

Should we low crawl chins dug into the mud hoping were not shelled

Will we be a fool if we do stand up and charge toward the row of trees

Or will we die in this field of green if we raise our head above the weeds

Life is a war, every breath is a chance it will be the last one we breathe

 

 

To the trees like the charge ordered by General Robert E Lee

Like life itself no matter what we do, doubting itself is a gamble

Do we run in hope or do we cower in fear, do we die here, or there

This field to me so beautiful, there are worse places to be my grave

If we just cower here in the mud and never step out onto life’s field

We know we will never get out of this life alive, so what do we do

 

 

Hold your breath and pray, now step into this field of life or death

If in life we choose to never seek the thrills, then a cowards life we live

The fields of life we will not cross, nor the flowers will we ever smell

If we lived our life without the thrills, can we truly say we ever lived

To the trees child, to the trees, up off your ass and face your trees

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