Iran’s Supreme ‘Fraud/Liar’ Will Never Allow Honest Elections Or Any Semblance Of Honesty Or Freedom!

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SAUDI NEWS AGENCY ASHARQ AL-AWSAT)

Opinion

Iran Blocks Telegram

It is not strange that Iran is the only country in the Middle East that blocks services which are considered essential now like Twitter, Facebook, and WhatsApp as part of its continuous blackout policy. Tehran even disturbs the signal of several broadcast channels blocking citizens from any external media access.

Of all international social media applications available, Iranians are only left with the messaging application Telegram.

Telegram was formed by two Russian brothers and is headquartered in Germany. Almost 40 million Iranians use its voice messages, while 20 million use the application for texting. Being the only application available, this precious service is in high demand among Iranians who amount up to a quarter of Telegram’s users across the world.

But then the government quelled Iranians’ sole source of joy by blocking most of Telegram’s services, precisely the voice messages under the pretext of protecting national security.

The truth is that the regime blocked the application fearing it would affect the course of the upcoming elections; a course that had already been engineered.

Thousands of local candidates are “filtered” according to the criteria of the “democratic Iranian religious clerics”. In the end, only those whom they are satisfied with are allowed to run for elections. It is not a secret system and, eventually, no one is allowed to win the elections or even run for it if the Supreme Leader doesn’t agree.

The 2009 elections caused a great embarrassment both domestically and internationally because those who diverted from the leadership were figures licensed by the leaders of the regime to run for the elections.

The supreme leadership decided that Mahmoud Ahmadinejad would become president and forged the results accordingly. This angered the candidates who had the best chance in winning and led to the famous “Green Movement” revolution, during which many died or were injured and arrested. The memory of the uprising has been haunting the authorities that believe this massive antagonist movement wouldn’t have been possible, especially in Tehran, hadn’t it been for Twitter and Facebook.

Indeed, back then al-Arabiya Channel relied almost completely on the videos, photos and information it received from those two platforms to cover the Iranian events after the authorities shut down its office and expelled its correspondent. The results were astounding! The regime was in confusion after images of the protests, clashes, and injuries were broadcast on international media outlets.

After reading a report published about a month ago in the Los Angeles Times about the influence of Telegram inside of Iran, I sensed the regime’s fear and anticipated its next move. The report mentioned that the security authorities had already begun warning users of political messages and forced anyone who owned a channel with over 5,000 subscribers to obtain a permit from the Ministry of Culture. The government then began a series of arrests for active users on the application.

Iran has now shut most of Telegram’s services hoping to contain the atmosphere of the parliamentary and presidential elections, which are mostly an encore of the same charade. Results can be partially or completely forged, even after the filtration and suspension done during the early stages of candidacy.

The regime is really concerned with controlling the reactions of the Iranian street to avoid the repetition of the Green Revolution.

No surprises on the level of the presidential elections are expected because the approved candidates are just copies of each other.

Even former President Ahmadinejad, despite his importance and history, was banned by the Supreme Leader from running for this election. Ahmadinejad shocked everyone and announced himself a candidate with a series of clarifications and apologetic statements saying he didn’t disobey the directives of the Supreme Leader. He pledged to withdraw from the elections after the first round and said he only participated to support his friend, a presidential candidate, and give him the media and public attention.

Abdulrahman Al-Rashed

Abdulrahman Al-Rashed

Abdulrahman Al-Rashed is the former general manager of Al-Arabiya television. He is also the former editor-in-chief of Asharq Al-Awsat, and the leading Arabic weekly magazine Al-Majalla. He is also a senior columnist in the daily newspapers Al-Madina and Al-Bilad. He has a US post-graduate degree in mass communications, and has been a guest on many TV current affairs programs. He is currently based in Dubai.

More Posts

Iran: Will The Supreme Ruler Ali Khamenei Allow President Hassan Rouhani Win Re-Election?

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE ‘NATIONAL INTEREST’ REUTERS AND THE BBC)

Can Hassan Rouhani Win Re-Election?

Rouhani’s approach to foreign affairs, his basic faith in the power of diplomacy to resolve bitter conflicts, has been discredited.

November 29, 2016

Before the U.S. elections, when Trump’s chances at ascending to the Oval Office seemed, to most liberal voters at least, a distant possibility, Iranian hardliners lined up with many of the world’s other autocrats to cheer him on. This wasn’t just a display of schadenfreude. In Iran, few hardliners, and certainly not the country’s supreme leader, have ever said a nice thing about any U.S. politician. At the heart of their enthusiasm for Trump is the knowledge that however he changes U.S. policy toward Iran as president, it’ll significantly complicate Hassan Rouhani’s hopes of winning a re-election in May.

Rouhani has led a charge to fill the country’s elective institutions with a diverse coalition of moderates that generally share his centrist values on privatization and diplomatic engagement. In elections last February, he helped oust prominent hardliners from their long-held seats in the parliament and Assembly of Experts, a clerical oversight body. Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei, moreover, has a personal stake in the May elections, given his interest in isolating Hashemi Rafsanjani, a longtime rival who has orchestrated Rouhani’s rise, from the locus of executive power. As one former reformist official told Reuters in July, “Hardliners want a president who is closer to their camp and gets his directions from Khamenei’s allies.”

Amid this maneuvering, Trump’s electoral victory has all but sealed the legacy, if not the fate, of Rouhani’s landmark policy: the nuclear deal. Trump has promised to either renegotiate or alternately dismantle it – not that the distinction matters much. Rouhani said the day after Trump’s win that there would be “no possibility” of changing the deal. Short of a credible U.S. threat of war, it’s difficult to imagine why Rouhani would accept less favorable terms. At a minimum, Trump would have to make the trying case for why world powers should renege on their prior commitments and reimpose an international sanctions regime.

Suffice it to say, Trump may not know how to negotiate a “better” deal without losing the necessary international buy-in. The furthest his campaign staff has gone toward explaining how to wring a more exacting agreement is a garbled statement of the obvious: “He will take the agreement, review it, send it to Congress, demand from the Iranians to restore few issues or change few issues, and there will be a discussion,” Walid Phares, a top foreign policy adviser to Trump, told the BBC.

Regardless of what tack he takes in his first 100 days, Trump’s rhetoric makes it clear that he doesn’t intend on sweetening the deal for Iran. This has major implications for Rouhani’s popularity. Since the deal’s implementation in January, he has been fighting the perception that it’s failing. Rouhani justified his concessions by promising two outcomes: first, they would alleviate the threat of war against the world’s greatest military power, and second, they would inject foreign capital into the Iranian economy and reconnect it to the global marketplace.

Hardliners have already questioned this bargain, asking why Rouhani negotiated away the country’s hard-fought nuclear program for disparately little economic relief. “The public is asking: what has the nuclear deal accomplished for people’s livelihood and for the dignity of Islamic Iran?” an editorial in the country’s hardliner Kayhan newspaper asked last July, and that was when Rouhani still had a U.S. counterpart who wanted the deal to succeed as much he did. According to a poll released that same month, three-quarters of Iranians, out of a sample of 1 thousand, said they haven’t seen any economic improvement since the deal was signed.

That poll suggests the extent to which the deal hasn’t panned out for Iran. It was supposed to act as a springboard for foreign investment in Iran, a country endowed with natural resources, a robust consumer base and an unrivaled manufacturing capacity. But the gold rush never came, in large part because banks refrained from resuming commercial ties with Iran. The nuclear deal may have lifted restrictions on international trade with Iran, but it left intact a dizzying array of U.S. sanctions, which have in turn left an insurmountable compliance risk for big banks.

Iran’s Mass “Murderer” Ali Khamenei Declares War On All Islamic Believers World Wide?

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE ‘AL ARABIYA MIDDLE EAST NEWS DESK’)

Iranian opposition: Khamenei ordered Makkah attack

President of the National Council of Resistance of Iran (CNRI) Maryam Radjavi delivers a speech on June 13, 2015 during the CNRI annual meeting, in Villepinte. (AFP)

President-elect of the Iranian Resistance “strongly” condemned on Sunday the targeting of Saudi’s holy city Makkah with rockets launched from inside Yemen on October 29.

Maryam Rajavi said the strikes carried out were under the supervision of Quds Force, and ordered by Iranian Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei.

She referred to the attack as a “declaration of war to all Muslims around the world”.

She called for the expulsion of the “anti-human” and “anti-Islamic” regime from the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), and requested Islamic countries cut relations with the current Iranian regime.

“Even earlier the mullahs’ regime spared no effort to conduct crimes and desecration of Makkah and the sacred House of God. Among others were sending explosives to Saudi in 1986, and causing riot and chaos in Mecca in 1987 that took the lives of more than 400 pilgrims. This is the very same regime that did not even hesitate to explode the shrines of Shiite Imams in Mashhad and Samarra in a bid to maintain its infamous reign,” Rajavi said.

Earlier, the Iranian Resistance revealed transferring arm shipments by the mullah’s regime to Yemen.

Will Ali Khomeini Have Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani Murdered In Venezuela This Week?

 

This week the President of Iran, Hassan Rouhani gave a speech saying that the Iranian Government needed to “back it down a notch” concerning rhetoric toward Saudi Arabia and the U.S.. Within a couple of hours the person who really rules Iran as a true dictator “the Demon” Ali Khomeini who calls himself “The Supreme Leader” gave a very different speech concerning these issues. By no means is this the first time that the “moderate” President Mr. Hassan Rouhani differed on policy issues whether it be domestic or foreign. The Supreme Leader whom the people of Iran have not elected to that position constantly undermines the President of Iran whom the people did elect. Today Mr. Khomeini after the President spoke of a lighter touch concerning the Saudi’s and the U.S. did his typical tongue lashing of the President and spoke a very harsh line toward the U.S. and the Saudi’s. For those of you who do not know it, Iran is the biggest Shiite Islamic country in the Middle-East and Saudi Arabia is the largest Sunni Islamic country in the Middle-East and these two branches of Islam have hated each other since the Islamic faith started about 1,400 years ago. If the U.S. Security Agency’s are correct these two country’s are the biggest supporters of terrorism in the world. Both want total control of the Islamic faith, and of the whole world. The U.S. of course is hated by almost all the Sunni and the Shiite and is constantly refereed to as “the Great Satan.” Yet because the Saudi Government sells the U.S. many billions of dollars worth of oil each year and the U.S. sells the Saudi’s billions of dollars of military equipment the U.S. Government stays mostly quiet about terrorist acts committed by Saudi citizens. Also ever since “the Islamic Revolution” in 1979 Iran and the U.S. have been at odds with each other.

 

This weekend the OPEC country of Venezuela is having a conference, a get together if you will of Nations called “the Non Aligned Movement Country’s.” The Venezuelan President Mr. Maduro at this point in time is barely holding onto his power as President as most of his citizens want him ousted because he has done a horrible job with the Nations economy since he took office. The people of his Nation are out of work, have almost no utilities and they are starving. Crime in his country is totally out of control, even though his country is a OPEC country it appears that the revenues aren’t going to the people and the economy. Usually when this is happening history tells us that the leaders and their buddies are stealing the country blind. So, now there is this conference being held in Venezuela at the Island of Margarita. It is reported that things are so bad that even their, there is no running water and that employees are putting water jugs in the bathrooms of the major hotel so that the guests will be able to wash their hands. This hotel used to be considered a 5-star facility, now these honored guests can’t even flush their toilets or take a shower or bath.

 

My question is simple, with the living conditions on the ground there in Venezuela being what they are, how good is the security there really going to be? With the reality that ‘The Supreme Ruler’ hates the Iranian President because he is a man who dares to stand against the policies of Ali Khomeini  at times even publicly like yesterday, will Mr. Khomeini have the President assassinated while he is out of Iran there in Venezuela? Think about it for a moment, it would be an easy thing for Khomeini to have done. Having him murdered while he is in South America would be advantageous to him because he could and probably would blame the assassination on the U.S. Government. Certainly President Maduro of Venezuela whom also hates the U.S. and blames the Americans for almost all of his personal failings would have no problem blaming the Americans. To me this conference just seems like the ideal time and location for ‘the Supreme Leader’ to get rid of a President that he personally hates. I personally hope that this event does not happen but it is a well know fact that Mr. Khomeini is a mass murderer just like his daddy was and I do not believe he would lose any sleep over the death of the Iranian President. I hope I am wrong, I hope that no harm comes to President Rouhani, now, only time will tell.