China: Children with low IQs get special attention from teachers with big hearts

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SHANGHAI CHINA NEWS AGENCY ‘SHINE’)

 

Children with low IQs get special attention from teachers with big hearts

Shi Xiaojing came to school early on September 2, the first day of a new semester. She arrived before 7am to make sure that all preparations were done. Then she walked to the front gate of the school to greet the students.

Shi has been at the gate every school day since 2005 when she was appointed headmistress of Minhang Qizhi School, a special education facility for mentally handicapped students.

There are 202 students registered at the school, all of them are low-functioning, with IQs below 50. The average IQ of normal people varies from 85 to 115.

This year on opening day, she wore a red dress with a polka-dot shirt on top.

“I want to look bright to them,” she said.

About the same time, Binbin arrived at the school.

The bulky 20-year-old has worked as a librarian there for two years. His job on the first day was to prepare printed documents for teachers and take care of the delivery of new books for the library.

When the flag-raising ceremony began at 8 am, Binbin had just finished carrying the last box of books in. His blue shirt was soaked with sweat.

Shi walked over to Binbin.

“Look at you, all wet,” she said, patting his shoulder. “Go change into your other shirt. You know where I put it.”

Unlike other employees here, Binbin is graduate of Qizhi. He is autistic.

“He enrolled in the school the same year as I came when he was 5,” Shi said, recalling how he stumbled around as a boy. “I used to teach normal middle school kids. I had no clue nor even the self-confidence to deal with these special children.”

Children with low IQs get special attention from teachers with big hearts

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

Shi Xiaojing, the headmistress of Minhang Qizhi School for mentally handicapped students, greets children in the classroom on September 2, the first day of a new semester.

When Shi first became the headmistress, she ran into a student in a shopping mall. The student yelled at her, and people around her stopped and stared. She maintained her cool and attempted to calm the student.

“Later I learned that the student’s mother was blind,” she said. “He was at the mall to help his mother with some banking business. At that moment, I told myself there is nothing to worry about. These are all just innocent souls.”

Each child has different symptoms. Many have nervous tics. Some are prone to violent fits. Most can be difficult to reach.

“There is no formula when communicating with them,” Shi said. “Each one of them is unique.”

When Shi came to Qizhi School, there were only five teachers with majors in special education; the rest were all amateurs like her. She spent all her spare time reading books and essays about special education.

Teachers at the school have felt their way through the curriculum. One of Binbin’s teachers, surnamed Wang, gradually noticed that drawing would calm the boy down during a fit of anger. So Binbin was encouraged to go to the blackboard to draw whatever he wanted whenever he became stressed.

Over time, Binbin started to understand the instructions from the teachers. More importantly, he learned to express himself in a way that could be understood by others.

“Despite their different symptoms and conditions, they share similar problems,” Shi said. “Delayed and deviant language development and poor athletic ability.”

Shi has evaluated each student individually to ascertain the best way to teach them to communicate. Throughout the years, she and her staff have published more than 350 papers on special education for the mentally handicapped.

Children with low IQs get special attention from teachers with big hearts

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

Students from Minhang Qizhi School have their first class of a new semester on September 2.

The mental state of students wasn’t Shi’s only concern. She also had to worry about the mental state of teachers.

In 2006, she received a letter from a teacher.

“I think I’m going crazy,” the letter began.

The teacher’s class had eight students, five of them autistic. The young teacher just couldn’t cope.

“I immediately asked her to withdraw from the class and tried to offer her a new position,” Shi said. “But she left the school anyway, the only teacher to do so.”

Teachers face more than mental stress. Zhang Li, a physical education teacher at the school, was once bashed by a student.

“You think you are strong enough when you major in sports,” Zhang said. “But my chest ached for days.”

Such violent incidents are common at the school. Shi organized psychological counseling for all teachers and initiated lecture sessions for them on how to communicate with special students.

“Unlike many teachers in general education, who can proudly recall students who went on to become distinguished, special education teachers can never feel that level of satisfaction,” Shi said. “These students express their love and gratitude in other ways, and those ways can make you feel that all your efforts are worthwhile, frustrations notwithstanding.”

Haohao is a fifth-grade student at Qizhi. His mother died when he was only three months old. When he was one, Haohao was diagnosed with autism. He was raised by his grandparents and had never called anyone mama.

“You can imagine how surprised we were when Haohao came home and told us things about his ‘mama’ headmistress,” said Wang Tongfen, Haohao’s grandmother. “Though he is autistic, the headmistress noticed his craving to perform and express himself.”.

Wang and her husband are both over 80, and they worry about what will happen to their grandson when they are gone.

“Unfortunately, most mentally handicapped children have to stay at home after they leave school,” Shi said. “What we have to do is to create a future where they can find their place in society.”

Children with low IQs get special attention from teachers with big hearts

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

The students of Minhang Qizhi School gather on the playground to attend the flag-raising ceremony.

Since 1993, when Qizhi School first opened, more than 300 students have graduated. Only a small proportion of students managed to find stable jobs.

“Many of them had worsened conditions after they left, and there was no choice but for them to remain at home,” Shi told Shanghai Daily. “Even though my job has won me titles and awards, those things don’t matter as long as these children and their families are still struggling to make their way in life.”

The situation is improving. Of the 20 students who have graduated since 2017, about half have found jobs.

During the summer break, Shi said she visited the now online celebrity Menggongfang Café, where most of the staff are mentally handicapped. (Read Shanghai Daily’s story about the café on https://www.shine.cn/news/metro/1907218817/)

“It is a good sign that the public is now paying more attention to the plight of the mentally handicapped,” Shi said. “Yet I keep thinking that we can do more than simply offering jobs to a handful of these young people.”

Shi envisions other workplaces where special students can work for a few months to learn useful skills and learn to blend in with society.

As she outlined these plans to a Shanghai Daily reporter, Binbin returned, with his shirt changed.

“Are you doing an interview?” he asked. “Please make sure mama headmistress looks pretty in the photos.”

Shi bent over in laughter, and Binbin laughed too.

Jordan’s State Teachers Hold Open Strike

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SAUDI NEWS AGENCY ASHARQ AL-AWSAT)

 

Jordan’s State Teachers Hold Open Strike

Sunday, 8 September, 2019 – 09:00
Jordanian protesters hold Jordanian national flags as they chant slogans during a protest against U.S. President Donald Trump’s “Deal of the Century”, after the Friday prayer in Amman, Jordan, June 21, 2019. REUTERS/Muhammad Hamed
Amman – Mohammed Kheir Al Rawashda
Jordan’s public school teachers’ union called for a strike on Sunday in demand for a pay increase. This follows news of the government tying state teachers’ raises to career variables–performance gauges set by the ministry of education–which the union vehemently rejected.

The strike will continue to be held despite ongoing dialogue between the union and state, sources told Asharq Al-Awsat, stressing that the union is in debate for a series of escalatory actions should their demands remain unmet.

Well-informed sources told Asharq Al-Awsat that union official Nasser Al Nawasra refused a government offer and maintained the union’s demands for an unconditioned pay increase to all state teachers.

“There was an agreement on this with the government, but the government backtracked on its commitment,” teachers’ union spokesman Noureddine Nadim said in a statement Thursday.

Nawasra told AFP that public school teachers were “the lowest-paid public officials.”

“I’ve been teaching for 24 years, and my salary doesn’t go above 760 dinars ($1,070)” per month, al-Nawasra said.

The teachers’ union was established in 2011 and includes about 140,000 members. Organizers of the demonstration in the capital, Amman, said the government has yet to deliver on a 50 percent wage increase agreed upon in 2014.

It is worth noting that the streets of Jordanian cities saw mass protests last year over spiking consumer prices.

The government said in a statement that it is committed to dialogue with the teachers but that classes should not be interrupted and performance must improve.

Early on, during the teachers’ sit-in, the government arrested 49 teachers who were later released on bail on Thursday.

Government circles accuse Islamist in Jordan of egging the union on for the strikes by several associates.

“We respect the teachers and we salute their role and their mission, but the 50% increase demanded by the union will add JOD 112 million ($158 million) to the state budget,” Ministry of Education spokesman Walid Jallad said in a statement.

(Truthful Poem) Habitual Liars

Habitual Liars

 

A child’s knowledge is based with their Parents

We obey their words or our butt gets a spanking

With a little age we learn if their words are true

Good Parent, bad Parent we learn if they lie too

The hate filled lies of a Parent leaves a hollow hole

 

Angy Teachers filled with rage and their daily lies

One bad one drains the energy out of a whole life

Eleven good, one bad, the evil ones filled with lies

Like a bad Cop, just one can ruin all the days of life

Crooked Attorneys and Judges who earn on the side

 

The World is based on the Rich Man’s fraud and deceit

Gold has made man’s lies the truth and truth into lies

The Father of all Liars controls the lips of the greedy

Politicians only speak the lies of their Political Party

Office of Oval bought by a Commie and his Habitual Liar

Teachers in the US are even more segregated than students

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF BROOKINGS)

 

BROWN CENTER CHALKBOARD

Teachers in the US are even more segregated than students

Michael Hansen and Diana Quintero 

Editor’s Note:This post is part of “Teacher diversity in America,” a series from the Brown Center on Education Policy that examines minority under-representation among public educators in the U.S.

An increasing amount of evidence shows that alignment in the racial or ethnic identity of teachers and students is associated with a range of positive student outcomes, from test scores to disciplinary actions to teacher expectations. Due to the under-representation of teachers of color in the current workforce, minority students stand to disproportionately benefit from efforts to increase teacher diversity.

Authors

Diana Quintero

Research Analyst – Governance Studies, Brown Center on Education Policy

With this evidence, it is easy for many practitioners and policymakers to take a next logical step, concluding that, because minority students tend to benefit uniquely from diverse teachers, teachers of color will be most beneficial in schools serving large numbers of minority students. Thus, any new teachers of color are often steered (whether covertly or overtly) toward high-minority schools. Taken to an extreme, given the tenacious grip of racial segregation on America’s schools, we could have a school system where the teacher workforce is every bit as diverse as its students—and perhaps every bit as segregated.

In addition to the risk of creating a racially segregated workforce, the logical leap above is misguided for at least two reasons. First, it ignores the evidence showing that teachers of color benefit white students—perhaps not always through test scores, but through pro-social beliefs and attitudes. Second, schools serving large numbers of minority students already tend to have the most racially diverse workforces, while many students of color in predominantly white schools have virtually no exposure to teachers of color.

As districts and states across the country pursue racial and ethnic diversity among teachers, we should pay attention to how teachers of color are distributed to avoid creating another layer of school segregation.

As districts and states across the country pursue racial and ethnic diversity among teachers, we should pay attention to how teachers of color are distributed to avoid creating another layer of school segregation. After briefly conceptualizing segregation and its manifestations in schools, we report our findings that teachers are even more segregated than students in the U.S., suggesting the need for a new framework around the hiring of non white teachers.

MANY TYPES OF SEGREGATION

School segregation does not exist in a vacuum, but is part of an interconnected structure of segregation that extends to residence and employment. Residential segregation can be primarily attributed not to self-segregation of minority racial groups but instead to decades of federal policy that prevented nonwhite families from acquiring mortgages, redlining practices, the strategic placement of interstates and highways throughout the 20th century, and individual actions of white families. Employment segregation takes the form of predominantly white jobs having an average salary four times higher than that of heavily black or Hispanic jobs. Furthermore, a 2017 meta-analysis of callback rates for fake resumes with racially coded names reveals the continued presence of simple employment discrimination.

Each of these factors significantly influences the racial segregation of students across schools. Although the school integration movement achieved significant gains following the landmark 1954 Supreme Court decision on Brown v. Board of Education, many of its victories have been reversed in the past 20 years, returning the American public school system to segregation levels last seen during the Civil Rights era. Resegregation in recent decades is most apparent in looking at the number of schools with very high concentrations of minorities, which are becoming more common and even more monolithically radicalized than in the past. In 2010, the average white student is just as exposed to black students as they were in 1980, while the average black student is actually less exposed to white students than they were 30 years before.

FACTORS SEGREGATING THE TEACHER WORKFORCE, PAST AND PRESENT

Understanding the history of teacher segregation helps to lay the groundwork for our analysis of teacher segregation today. This history can be clearly traced back to that same Brown decision, which ruled that separate schools for black and white students were inherently unequaland ordered that Southern schools integrate “with all deliberate speed.” As student integration began, however, teachers did not follow suit. Instead, massive layoffs for black teachers immediately followed. About 38,000black teachers lost their job in the decades after Brown—an estimated one-third of the nation’s black teachers.

Since teaching represented one of the few paths available to the middle class for educated African-Americans, black teachers in the pre-Brown era was highly respected and held central positions in their communities. Thus, not only did these displacements represent a career loss for the black teacher and the loss of a role model or advocate for a black student, but they also symbolized the destabilizing of Southern black communities. Since this period of mass displacement, black college graduates have chosen to enter the teaching profession at decreasing rates, thanks to factors including widening career options and the rise of teacher competency tests.

These historical roots of segregation persist and teachers of color are not spread evenly across today’s public schools. Rather, schools often act as pockets of minority teachers—or pockets without. A 2011 report estimated over 40 percent of public schools do not employ a single teacher of color. Instead, teachers of color are two to three times more likely than white teachers to work in disadvantaged schools—typically urban schools with high-minority student bodies.

Segregation among teachers today is likely due at least in part to different teacher preferences. For example, both white and non white teachers report higher job satisfaction and turn over less frequently when their principal is their same race. Kirabo Jackson evaluated changes in the teacher workforce when North Carolina’s Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools quit busing students and found teachers partially resegregated along with students. Furthermore, a survey of black male teachers reports that those who are the lone black teacher in their school had more negative perceptions of their working environment, compared to those who had four or more black colleagues.

In addition, districts’ hiring and placement practices certainly play a part in continuing segregation as well. The latest research on this topic, conducted by professors at George Mason University, reveals that, in one large school district, white teachers were hired at a disproportionate rate compared to how often they applied. On the other hand, black teachers disproportionately received offers from black principals—if they got an offer at all. Black teachers were also much more likely to be hired in low-income schools.

TEACHER VERSUS STUDENT SEGREGATION NATIONWIDE

How does teacher segregation compare to the level of student segregation in the country? We use school enrollment and teacher staffing data from the National Teacher and Principal Survey to compute two types of segregation measures, which we explain in turn.

The first type is a dissimilarity measure, a numerical value between 0 and 1 that is often interpreted as the share of the minority group that would need to switch schools to achieve perfect integration across schools. For simplicity, we calculate this measure between two racial groups: white and non white. When we compute this statistic for teachers across all schools nationwide, we find a dissimilarity index of 0.61. In other words, three of every five non white teachers would need to be reassigned in order to achieve even distribution across schools. Remarkably, this is larger than the analogous dissimilarity computed among students in the same sample, which comes out of 0.56.

Computing a dissimilarity index nationwide masks underlying regional demographic differences. Yet, even state-level dissimilarity index measures show teachers in 37 states exceed the state-level student dissimilarity index. Maps of both are presented below for comparison—it is visibly apparent that high dissimilarity is far more common among teachers than students. (States with fewer than 30 schools captured in the survey sample are suppressed in the maps.)

student dissimilarity index teacher diversity

teacher dissimilarity index teacher diversity

To be clear, we have no expectation that this dissimilarity measure should be zero. Many teachers of color enter the profession precisely because they desire to work in schools that serve their own communities. Yet, current levels of student segregation are widely viewed as problematic; teacher segregation measures above those of students raise serious questions about structural racism in teacher hiring and assignment practices.

The second type of segregation measure is exposure, representing the average level of exposure between races within a school. This measure also takes on values between 0 and 1, where 0 represents low exposure. We can compute different exposure measures depending on which group’s exposure we care about. When calculating the exposure of non white students to non white teachers, we estimate it to be 0.32—in other words, the average non white student in the data is in a school where non white teachers account for nearly a third of all teachers.

When we calculate white student exposure to non white teachers, we estimate it to be far lower: 0.09. The large discrepancy in these numbers indicate vastly different experiences for students, depending on which types of schools they attend. For the many non white students who attend predominantly white schools, their chances of exposure to teachers of similar backgrounds are discouragingly low.

WHICH STUDENTS SHOULD GET MORE TEACHERS OF COLOR?

In this post, we have endeavored to explore racial segregation among teachers in public schools, and its relation to student segregation. We find racial segregation is actually higher among teachers than students, a surprising result given how much more autonomy teachers (but not students) ostensibly benefit from in choosing schools. This finding compels us to ask whether the current distribution of teachers of color is doing the most good for students.

This analysis sends a clear signal that non white teachers are needed in far more places than we currently have them, and those many schools with no teachers of color are the places that need them most.

In our view, informed by both evidence and values, teachers of color should be more evenly distributed across schools. Recent findings suggest the impressive benefits of racial matching between students and teachers do not appear to increase with dosage. Stated differently, a segregated faculty of black teachers for black students offers no obvious matching benefit beyond that expected by a diverse series of teachers over time. Instead, the ideals of a democratic, multicultural society are most likely to be advanced when teachers and leaders in our schools model that diversity for the nation’s youth.

While we applaud the efforts of many districts to promote diverse teacher recruitment, most of these efforts have come from locales with high populations of minority student groups and already hire diverse teachers in fairly large numbers. This analysis and other findings in our teacher diversity series send a clear signal that non white teachers are needed in far more places than we currently have them, and those many schools with no teachers of color are the places that need them most.

Bethany Kirkpatrick contributed to this post.

The Brown Center Chalkboard launched in January 2013 as a weekly series of new analyses of policy, research, and practice relevant to U.S. education.

In July 2015, the Chalkboard was re-launched as a Brookings blog in order to offer more frequent, timely, and diverse content. Contributors to both the original paper series and current blog are committed to bringing evidence to bear on the debates around education policy in America.

Read papers in the original Brown Center Chalkboard series »

Kentucky governor says teachers’ strike left children vulnerable to sexual assault

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

(I LIVE IN KENTUCKY AND THERE ARE SOME THINGS THAT THE PEOPLE OF KENTUCKY HAVE LEARNED ABOUT OUR FIRST TERM GOVERNOR. WE HAVE LEARNED THAT HE WILL SAY ANYTHING TO GET WHAT HE WANTS. WE HAVE LEARNED THAT HE LIES A LOT AND THAT HE DOES NOT GIVE A DAMN ABOUT THE ‘WORKING CLASS’ PEOPLE AND THAT DOES INCLUDE TEACHERS AND PROFESSORS, HE IS A TRUE ‘TRUMPIAN!)(IF YOU WANT TO BE TOTALLY HONEST ABOUT IT, IT IS GOVERNOR BLEVIN, THROUGH HIS ACTIONS OF LITERALLY ROBBING THE PENSIONS OF ALL KENTUCKY EDUCATORS THAT MADE THEM HAVE A ‘SICK IN’. BLEVIN THROUGH HIS ACTIONS CAUSED THIS WHOLE EVENT: SO CHILDREN BEING LEFT VULNERABLE TO SEXUAL ASSAULT IS TOTALLY THE FAULT OF GOVERNOR BLEVIN AND HIS REPUBLICAN LAWMAKERS IN THE CAPITAL. HE/THEY, ROB PEOPLE THEN HE BLAMES THEM BECAUSE THEY DARED COMPLAINS ABOUT HIM ROBING THEM, WHAT AN ASS!)(COMMENTARY IS BY: OLDPOET)

Kentucky governor says teachers’ strike left children vulnerable to sexual assault

(CNN)Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin says children were left vulnerable to harm, sexual assault and drugs as a result of public school closures throughout the state Friday to allow teachers and supporters to protest at the state’s Capitol.

“I guarantee you somewhere in Kentucky today a child was sexually assaulted that was left at home because there was nobody there to watch them,” the Republican governor told reporters Friday afternoon, according to CNN affiliate WDRB.
“I guarantee you somewhere today, a child was physically harmed or ingested poison because they were home alone because a single parent didn’t have any money to take care of them.”
Bevin went on to say that “some were introduced to drugs for the first time because they were vulnerable and left alone.”
CNN has reached out to Bevin’s communications director. The governor’s press secretary did not immediately return CNN’s request for comment Saturday morning.
The Kentucky Education Association, which organized Friday’s rally, strongly opposes a bill to overhaul pensions that Gov. Bevin signed this week. Under the bill, new hires will have to enter a cash-balance plan, as opposed to a traditional pension, and teachers will be limited in the number of new sick days they can put toward their retirement.
Members of the teachers union also were critical of Bevin’s vetoes of budget and revenue bills, both of which the union said are crucial to funding public education.
On Friday, Bevin claimed to see people “hanging out” and “taking the day off” as teachers and school personnel gathered at the Capitol in Frankfort.
“I’m offended by the fact that people so cavalierly, and so flippantly, disregarded what’s truly best for children,” he said.
Bevin’s comments received bipartisan backlash in the state.
“There are no words for this other than, I am appalled!” President of the Kentucky Education Association Stephanie Winkler wrote on Twitter.
Republican state Sen. Max Wise, who serves as the chamber’s Education Committee chairman, also had harsh words for Bevin’s remarks.
“The disgusting comments by Gov. Bevin insinuating that a peaceful protest by teachers would lead to sexual assault are reprehensible,” Wise said Friday on Twitter. “I don’t agree with these comments & I find them repulsive.”

Maturity: Have We Ever Been Guilty Of It

Maturity: Have We Ever Been Guilty Of It (Written On 7-4-15)

 

Today Our Nation turns 239 years of age. I am of the generations of Americans who in 1976 on this date was 19 years old. 1976 Was Our Nations 200th birthday. Now, in this time era I am 58 years old. All of you folks who are of an age where you can remember 1976, do the memories of how you were raised back then ever haunt you? The maturity as you see maturity today, how were the adults in your life toward you? I am speaking of at home, in the neighborhoods, churches, schools? Just something I would like you to chew on while you hopefully continue reading the article.

 

1976, I was married with one child and another in the oven getting ready to say howdy, I was 19 and immature and ignorant as a young man could be. Maturity, I sure do wish I and my Bride at the time could have had more of it. That alone would not have been able to save that marriage, but it sure wouldn’t have hurt matters any. When your parents, guardians, and adults at your schools fail to have the young people ready for the real world they are getting ready to step into, they/we have failed those young people. Is this a lack of maturity, morality, caring, or love, on the adults part? When the parents, teachers, administrators, churches, and neighborhoods fail to train and care for the little eyes watching us, our lack of maturity and caring is plainly on display. When you are 18 and have your fresh new Diploma in your hand, now what? It is difficult to survive in the real world with little or no education, technical training, or preparedness training by the ones who are supposed to be the grownups.

 

39 Years ago today I still had good health, but really no dreams. Everyday was about getting enough hours on my near minimum wage jobs to buy the grocery’s and pay the rent. Today at 58 my health has been better and I have been blessed with a life time of memories, good and bad. But I do know this, the immaturity of a parental figure, of teachers, coaches, and many other adults involved with the lives of a child, stays with the child for life.

 

I look back at the good memories and I try to forget the bad ones of the things done to me by supposed caring adults. Do you know the feeling of how you don’t want to be like your father figure when you grow up, then have to face the facts, in many ways you were worse? My dad died in December of 93, I was 37. Twenty plus years have passed now, his immaturity, his hate, the hurts are all written in stone now, yet the memories still invade my thoughts sometimes. My own mistakes though, my own lack of maturity, of grownup actions, at times these haunt me day and night.

 

Maturity matters so very much in each and every one of us. Teaching maturity, respect and kindness to our children and our grandchildren through our examples is the least we can do for them. Teachers, now there is a tough job for any poor Soul to try. There are many good teachers and most of the ones in my life I had to give a C too. There are three or four that stand out in my memories as adults who actually cared and tried to help kids at lest learn the class material well enough to be passed onto the next grade or level. Most you could tell were just putting in their shift, any job can get old but around kids though they absorb the caring or lack there of from these adults. So yes there were some A Teachers and I still remember their names and their faces. Unfortunately it seems that every school is just like every other business, there are some employees/teachers that should be arrested, not awarded with a pay check and then a pension. Dang, that sounds like Wall Street some doesn’t it?

 

I have a question for you, when you finished high school were you ready/prepared to step into the adult world? Did you really have a clue about real life? If you were ready, if you really did have a clue about survival, congratulations, I didn’t. Maturity is a huge part of society. Our children will find it difficult to grow and prosper as a civilized society if our children are not treated fairly by us now. In trying to always be honest with you I had a parent who really needed to work on his caring skills but I was blessed with one great parent. My opinion of some of the teachers I had as well as a few principles and administrators who were a pathetic joke as far as even being decent a human beings toward me. It’s difficult to understand how some people came up with the idea that they should go into the education field is beyond me. Then again how many young folks top concern when they spread their legs is how ready they are to lovingly raise little Jack and little Jill?

 

Teaching maturity to our children by our examples helps give them a huge crucial building block toward having a happy productive life. When we and the school systems fail to act like intelligent adults we condemn our own children to ignorance, depression, poverty, and broken homes. Maturity, morality and kindness are things that all decent human beings need to have nurtured into them as children.  Instead we use, abuse, discard and treat them like computerized toilet paper. Many children grow up to be abusers, that is all they know, so with each generation many people commit even greater sins than their fathers. Maturity matters, caring matters, love matters, do the children matter?

 

 

(Spiritual Philosophy Poem) What Is Truth

WHAT IS TRUTH

 

O Governor Pilate what a question you did ask the Lord, “what is truth”

Does it matter how pockets are filled of the eyebrows raised so high

Human circumstances sometimes run on a foggy blade of a seeded lie

Do we choose to live and love or grow old and hate, what never was

What I might, I could have, maybe if I would have, now ancient times

 

From seed to egg the spark of life is breathed into the Soul of life

From the womb we’re ripped and beaten by such calloused hands

First slap of many, turns out childhood can be the house of the dead

Parents, teachers, do they really see or care about the little hearts

Abused, cursed and beaten such memories of ones childhood days

 

Why care how these lives turn out their nothing but poor trash anyhow

Yea the little mice grow up to be big vicious rats we justifiably lock away

Prisons, beaten, molested, hate filled abuse, training field for next go round

Adulthood the time you can revolt against all, but how we revolt, We choose

How we choose to reciprocate is the tale of the legacy that we leave behind

 

The beater so often suffered, yet chose to give out undeserved anger and hate

Why do the children of cheaters grow up to be so wise on how best to cheat

Turning to the good or to the bad, how does the raped become one who rapes

The people and the governments all filled with versions of what we say, Truth Is

Pilate had you waited for the answer, would you have believed Gods version anyway

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

India, Mob Attacks Police With Bows And Arrows

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HINDUSTAN TIMES)

Mob attacks cops with bow and arrow, block road in Burdwan

INDIA Updated: Jan 28, 2017 01:00 IST

PTI

Highlight Story

TMC activists show black flag and try to attack the car of Union Minister of State Babul Supriyo in Asansol in Burdwan district of West Bengal on Monday. (PTI Photo)

A mob on Friday attacked the police with bow and arrow and blocked the arterial Ausgram-Guskara Road in protest against detention of three school teachers and alleged manhandling of them at Guskara in Burdwan district.A police officer said some of the policemen were injured when a mob, accompanying some teachers of a local high school and it’s managing committee members, suddenly attacked the cops during altercation at the Guskara police station.

As police dispersed the mob and detained three of the teachers on charge of instigating the mob and preventing a public servant from discharging duty, it moved to nearby Guskara-Ausgram Road and blocked the road.

A section of the crowd also attacked the policemen with bows and arrows as a force tried to lift the blockade, the officer said.

The blockade, which went on for several hours, was lifted after police released the three teachers and promised to look into charges of high-handednes against the IC of Guskara police station.

Locals alleged 15 teacherz and 20 students were injured in police lathicharge during the agitation but the police denied there was any lathicharge.

Superintendent of Police Kunal Agarwal said police were looking into the allegations of highhandedness and action would be taken if anyone was found guilty.

The teachers and locals alleged police did not take action to stop unathorised construction near the school gate.

A black teacher asked her students to defend the Ku Klux Klan—and was promptly suspended — Quartz

The assignment was simple—to write a persuasive essay defending the actions of the Ku Klux Klan—yet the reactions to it were anything but. Parents of the 12- t0 14-year-old students who were given the essay prompt at the Business and Economics Academy of Milwaukee (BEAM), a charter school in Wisconsin, were startled enough by the…

via A black teacher asked her students to defend the Ku Klux Klan—and was promptly suspended — Quartz

Sometimes Educators In The U.S. Are Completely Out Of Touch With Reality

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME NEWS NETWORK)

‘To Be White Is to Be Racist.’ Oklahoma Teacher’s Race Lecture Divides

A high school teacher in Oklahoma sparked a controversy at his school when he told students in a discussion of race that “to be white is to be racist, period.”

“Am I racist? And I say, yeah. I don’t want to be. It’s not like I choose to be racist, but do I do things because of the way I was raised?” the unnamed teacher says in an audio recording made by one of his students who was offended by the lecture.

Some students, like the one who made the recording, were upset by the class, and Norman Public Schools Superintendent Joseph Siano said the situation was “poorly handled.”

“While discussing a variety of philosophical perspectives on culture, race and ethics, a teacher was attempting to convey to students in an elective philosophy course a perspective that had been shared at a university lecture he had attended,” Siano said in a statement, the Huffington Post reports. “We regret that the discussion was poorly handled.”

Other students, however, have begun demonstrating in support of the teacher, or at least in support of his attempt to tackle thorny issues.

“What has been reported in the news doesn’t accurately portray what happened in our philosophy class, nor does it reflect what we believe in at our school,” a student who attended both the class and the demonstration said in a statement to The Huffington Post. “The information was taken out of context and we believe it is important to have serious and thoughtful discussions about institutional racism in order to change history and promote exclusivity.”

Simply Pao.

A Journal of Trauma, Healing, and Motherhood

Blogging Theology

Exploring Life, the Universe and Everything

Two on a Rant

Rants, humor, sarcasm, and a haiku-like substance? It's hard to know what's going to come out of our minds next.

Charlie's Bird

living the dream with Charlie and Thandi and chirping all the way back to the nest.

By Hook Or By Book

Book Reviews, News, and Other Stuff

TOKIDOKI (NOMAD)

a world travel photo blog by Jackie Hadel

sketchuniverse

Arts resource, sketches and drawings classified by subject

The BookWorm Drinketh

Give Tea to the Tillerman, But Booze to the Bookworm!

Rhapsody Bohème

A warriors journey

Good Old Boots

"Not all those who wander are lost"

%d bloggers like this: