Over 1000-year-old sunken Chinese treasure returns home

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HINDUSTAN TIMES OF INDIA)

 

Over 1000-year-old sunken Chinese treasure returns home

The 162 pieces of treasure were part of a huge cargo of ninth-century porcelain traded from China during the Tang Dynasty.

WORLD Updated: Dec 11, 2017 18:26 IST

Press Trust of India, Beijing
A Ru Guanyao brush washer bowl from China's Song Dynasty is displayed during a press conference after its record breaking sale for $ 37.7 million at the Sotheby's Chinese Works of Art Autumn Sales in Hong Kong on October 3.
A Ru Guanyao brush washer bowl from China’s Song Dynasty is displayed during a press conference after its record breaking sale for $ 37.7 million at the Sotheby’s Chinese Works of Art Autumn Sales in Hong Kong on October 3.(AFP File Photo/Representative image)

A stash of 1,200-year-old Chinese treasure found under the sea has been returned to China’s central Hunan province.

Experts believe they will provide evidence of China’s overseas porcelain trade during the Tang Dynasty (618-907).

The 162 pieces of treasure were part of a huge cargo of ninth-century porcelain traded from China during the Tang Dynasty via an Arab dhow, which wrecked in Indonesia’s Java sea.

In 1998, a German salvage company discovered the shipwreck and named it ‘Batu Hitam’.

More than 67,000 pieces of treasure were found in the ship, 85 per cent of which came from a kiln in Changsha, now Hunan’s capital city.

Most of the porcelain is now owned by Tilman Walterfang, head of the salvage company.

In September, the administration office of the kiln in Changsha signed an agreement with Walterfang to return a collection of 162 pieces to China, state-run Xinhua news agency reported today.

The treasure sent home includes fine ceramics from several kilns in the provinces of Hunan, Zhejiang, Hebei, Henan and Guangdong.

The treasure is expected to be accessible to the public at a museum in Changsha by early 2018.

China: Stolen stone tower back from Taiwan

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SHANGHAI DAILY NEWS)

Stolen stone tower back from Taiwan

A CEREMONY was held at Shanxi Provincial Museum yesterday to welcome the return of a stone tower that was stolen 19 years ago from a village in north China and ended up in Taiwan.

The Dengyu stone tower, which was originally in Dengyu village of Yushe county, Shanxi, features Buddha images carved into its four sides. The piece was made in the Tang Dynasty (618-907).

The tower was 320 centimeters high and composed of a base, a 177-centimeter body, and spire. It is an excellent example of Tang Dynasty stone carving and was given provincial-level protection in 1965.

In 1996, the spire was stolen and is still missing.

The tower body was stolen in 1998, taken out of the Chinese mainland, and donated by a private collector to Taiwan’s Chung Tai Chan Monastery in 2015. The monastery decided to return the tower to Shanxi last year after it confirmed its origins.

The tower arrived at Shanxi Provincial Museum on January 24.

“We really appreciate the temple’s decision,” said Wang Taiming, head of Yushe county’s cultural relic bureau.

“The donation is an excellent example of cultural exchange between Taiwan and the Chinese mainland,” said Master Jian Deng, abbot of the Chung Tai Chan Monastery.

The museum said it will speed up safety improvements to preserve the pagoda and organize an exhibition.