Russian president Vladimir Putin signs law to label journalists as ‘foreign agents’

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HINDUSTAN TIMES OF INDIA)

 

Russian president Vladimir Putin signs law to label journalists as ‘foreign agents’

Foreign agents, defined as involved in politics and receiving money from abroad, must register with the justice ministry, label publications with the tag and submit detailed paperwork or face fines.

WORLD Updated: Dec 03, 2019 06:23 IST

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse

Moscow
Russian legislation passed in 2012 already gave authorities the power to brand media organisations and NGOs as foreign agents, a term that has Soviet-era overtones.
Russian legislation passed in 2012 already gave authorities the power to brand media organisations and NGOs as foreign agents, a term that has Soviet-era overtones.(REUTERS FILE)

Russian President Vladimir Putin has signed a controversial law allowing independent journalists and bloggers to be labelled as “foreign agents”, a move that critics say will violate media freedom.

Russian legislation passed in 2012 already gave authorities the power to brand media organisations and NGOs as foreign agents, a term that has Soviet-era overtones. The new law, which now extends to individuals, will come into effect immediately, according to a document published on the Russian government website.

Foreign agents, defined as involved in politics and receiving money from abroad, must register with the justice ministry, label publications with the tag and submit detailed paperwork or face fines.

Nine human rights NGOs, including Amnesty International and Reporters Without Borders, have expressed concern that the amendments may be aimed not only at journalists, but also at bloggers and internet users who benefit from scholarships, funding or revenues from a relevant media outlet.

NGOs said in a joint statement last month the law was “a further step to restrict free and independent media” and “a strong tool to silence opposition voices”.

Authors of the bill have said it is intended to “perfect” existing legislation on “foreign agents” that already covers NGOs and media organisations. Russia says it wants the law as a tit-for-tat mechanism if its journalists are defined as foreign agents in the West. Russia first passed legislation allowing media organisations to be slapped with the label in 2017, after Kremlin-funded RT television was declared a foreign agent in the United States. Russian opposition politician Alexi Navalny’s organisation has been branded a foreign agent, as has US-financed media outlet Radio Liberty/Radio Free Europe and Voice of America.

The term foreign agent was used negatively during the Stalinist era in the 1970s and 1980s for opponents accused of being paid by the West.

Russian spies likely intercepted ambassador’s cell phone call with Trump

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

Russian spies likely intercepted ambassador’s cell phone call with Trump

Washington (CNN)US Ambassador to the European Union Gordon Sondland’s cell phone call to President Donald Trump from a restaurant in Ukraine this summer appears to be a shocking security breach that raises significant counterintelligence concerns, according to several former officials, who told CNN there is a high probability that intelligence agencies from numerous foreign countries, including Russia, were listening in on the conversation.

“If true, the cell phone call between Ambassador Sondland and President Trump is an egregious violation of traditional counterintelligence practices that all national security officials — to include political appointee ambassadors such as Sondland — are repeatedly made aware of,” according to Marc Polymeropoulos, a former CIA officer who oversaw operations in Europe and Russia before retiring this summer.
“I cannot remember in my career any time where an ambassador in a high counterintelligence environment like Kiev would have such an unsecure conversation with a sitting president. This just should not happen,” he said.
Bill Taylor, the top US diplomat in Ukraine, revealed during the first public impeachment hearing Wednesday that a member of his staff, who was accompanying Sondland to meetings in Kiev, saw the ambassador call Trump from his cell phone and overheard the President asking about “the investigations.”
Taylor confirmed that he had come to understand the term “investigations” meant matters related to the 2016 election and to probes of Joe and Hunter Biden and Burisma.
“Ambassador Sondland told President Trump that the Ukrainians were ready to move forward,” Taylor told lawmakers.
The call occurred on July 26, according to Taylor — the day after Trump’s phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky that prompted a whistleblower complaint alleging Trump solicited “interference” from a foreign country to help his 2020 presidential campaign.
This new information could strengthen Democrats’ argument for impeachment that Trump engaged in an alleged quid pro quo but it also serves as another example of top US officials ignoring security protocols related to sensitive communications.
It remains unclear if Sondland’s cell phone was encrypted but US ambassadors do not typically have that type of protection on their mobile devices, according to current and former US government officials.
The State Department did not immediately respond to CNN’s request for comment on whether Sondland’s cell phone was outfitted with any sort of enhanced security.
Normally, a US ambassador talking to the President would do so from the embassy using a secure line, one former intelligence official told CNN. “Of all the communications, cell phones are even more vulnerable than non-secure landlines, which are way more vulnerable than secure communications facilities,” the former official said.
That lapse was only amplified by the fact that Sondland made the call in public, where it could have been easily overheard and in a foreign country that is already being targeted by foreign adversaries of the US, including Russia, current and former officials said.

‘Crazy for today’s age’

“Why a president is talking to an ambassador on a non-encrypted telephone is crazy for today’s age, and worse in public,” said Todd Carroll, a former FBI official who served as assistant special agent in charge of the cyber and counterintelligence branch.
“Ukraine is one of the most open areas for intelligence agencies to work in. Both sides. I was told when I was there in 2010 that expect all your calls to be monitored,” Carroll added.
The Russians, in particular, maintain a particularly large intelligence presence in Ukraine and are known to target the communications of US officials.
“There is little doubt that the Russians and perhaps multiple other foreign intelligence services would have intercepted this call. Moscow undoubtedly would have been pleased,” according to Polymeropoulos.
“This would offer the Russians some important validation that President Trump was in effect doing exactly what Moscow almost certainly was already aware of: that our President was inserting a serious wedge into ongoing US security assistance programs that Ukraine so desperately needed in their ongoing battle with Russia,” he added.
Fiona Hill, a former Russia aide on Trump’s National Security Council, testified in October that she had previously tried to get Sondland to stop using his personal cell phone for work.
“I mean, some of it was comical, but it was also, for me and for others, deeply concerning. And I actually went to our Intelligence Bureau and asked to have (redacted) sit down with him and explain that this was a counterintelligence risk, particularly giving out our personal phone numbers,” Hill told House investigators.
“All of those communications could have been ex-filtrated by the Russians very easily,” she said.
CNN has previously reported that Trump was using his personal cell phone to contact outside advisers, raising concerns that his calls were vulnerable to eavesdropping from foreign governments.
“All communications devices of all senior government officials are targeted by foreign governments. This is not new,” Bryan Cunningham, executive director of the Cyber security Policy and Research Institute at the University of California-Irvine, told CNN last year.
“What is new in the cell phone age is the ease of intercepting them,” Cunningham added. “Of course, calls are only secure if both parties use a secure device.”

Iran says it arrested 17 Iranians allegedly recruited by CIA

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF ABC NEWS)

 

Iran says it arrested 17 Iranians allegedly recruited by CIA

PHOTO: The Iranian flag flutters in front the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) headquarters in Vienna, Austria, on Wednesday, July 10, 2019.Lisi Niesner/Reuters
WATCHIran claims to have captured spies working for CIA

Iran said Monday it has arrested 17 Iranian nationals allegedly recruited by the Central Intelligence Agency to spy on the country’s nuclear and military sites, and that some of them have already been sentenced to death.

Interested in Iran?

Add Iran as an interest to stay up to date on the latest Iran news, video, and analysis from ABC News.

The arrests took place over the past months, and those taken into custody worked on “sensitive sites” in the country’s military and nuclear facilities, an Iranian intelligence official told a press conference in Tehran. He did not elaborate, say how many of them were sentenced to death or when the sentences were handed down.

President Donald Trump tweeted that the claim had “zero truth,” calling Iran a “total mess.”

The announcement comes as Iran’s nuclear deal with world powers is unraveling and tensions have spiked in the Persian Gulf region. The crisis stems from Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the agreement last year and intensify sanctions on the country.

The Iranian official did not give his name but was identified as the director of the counterespionage department of Iran’s Intelligence Ministry. It’s rare in Iran for intelligence officials to appear before media, or for any official to give a press conference without identifying himself.

The official claimed that none of the 17, who allegedly had “sophisticated training,” had succeeded in their sabotage missions. Their spying missions included collecting information at the facilities where they worked, carrying out technical and intelligence activities, and transferring and installing monitoring devices, he said.

The official further claimed the CIA had promised U.S. visas or jobs in America and that some of the agents had turned and were now working with his department “against the U.S.”

He also handed out a CD with a video recording of an alleged foreign female spy working for the CIA. The disc also included names of several U.S. Embassy staff in Turkey, India, Zimbabwe and Austria who Iran claims were in touch with the recruited Iranian spies.

Trump rejected the allegations.

“The Report of Iran capturing CIA spies is totally false. Zero truth. Just more lies and propaganda (like their shot down drone) put out by a Religious Regime that is Badly Failing and has no idea what to do. Their Economy is dead, and will get much worse. Iran is a total mess!” he tweeted.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, a former CIA director, declined on Monday to address specifics of the arrests. But he added that “the Iranian regime has a long history of lying.”

Pompeo pointed to differences between the U.S. and Iranian accounts of the location of an unmanned U.S. drone the Iranians shot down in June, among other incidents.

“I think everyone should take with a grain of salt everything that the Islamic Republic of Iran asserts today,” he said. “They have 40 years of history of them lying, so we should all be cautious reporting things that the Iranian leadership tells us.”

Pompeo, speaking to The Associated Press over the phone, said that the world is “watching the Iranian regime understand that they’ve got a real challenge, that America and the world understands that they are a rogue regime conducting terror campaigns.”

Iran occasionally announces the detention of people it says are spying for foreign countries, including the U.S. and Israel. In June, Iran said it executed a former staff member of the Defense Ministry who was convicted of spying for the CIA.

In April, Iran said it uncovered 290 CIA spies both inside and outside the country over the past years.

———

Karimi reported from Tehran, Iran. Associated Press writer Brendan Farrington in Tallahassee, Florida, contributed.

The North Korean spies Ukraine caught stealing missile plans

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

The North Korean spies Ukraine caught stealing missile plans

Updated 4:50 PM ET, Thu August 24, 2017

Zhytomyr, Ukraine (CNN) The images are a little grainy, but in the half-light of a dusty Ukrainian garage, you can sense the unbridled enthusiasm of the two North Korean spies who are photographing what they think are top-secret missile designs.

In a rare window into the opaque, deadly and secretive world of missile technology espionage, Ukrainian security services have given CNN surveillance footage and details of an elaborate sting operation they carried out to snare two North Korean spies in 2011.
The revelations are aimed at dispelling claims that a recent leap forward in Pyongyang’s intercontinental missile technology may have been achieved by using designs stolen or originating from Ukraine.

Video from North Korean state media purports to show the launching of an intercontinental ballistic missile.

The claims are made in a report released by analysts at the International Institute of Strategic Studies (IISS) on August 14 which says technology, possibly from Ukraine’s Yuzhnoye Design Office in Dnipro, was used in recent North Korean missile tests.
In July, North Korea successfully tested two intercontinental ballistic missiles(ICBMs) — the KN-14 or Hwasong-14. At the time, Pyongyang claimed they were capable of carrying a “large-sized heavy nuclear warhead” as far as the US mainland.
Ukraine has denied any link to North Korea’s long-range missiles, and said Russia may instead have provided Pyongyang with the improved missile designs. Russia has denied supporting North Korea’s arms program.
An officer with Ukraine’s security service, who worked on the 2011 case of the two North Koreans and who we granted anonymity because of his operational role, insisted it was “impossible” North Korea had obtained any missile technology, as he was sure their espionage attempts had all been intercepted.
He said that in 2011 two other North Koreans — who traveled to Ukraine from the country’s Moscow Embassy — were deported after they were caught trying to obtain “missile munitions, homing missile devices in particular for air-to-air class missiles.” A third North Korean, tasked with transporting the actual devices out of Ukraine, was also deported.
And as recently as 2015, five North Koreans were deported for “assisting North Korea’s intelligence work in Ukraine,” the officer said, without providing further details.
He said, apart from the two in jail, there were no North Koreans left in Ukraine, as those not deported by Ukraine had been voluntarily withdrawn — many working in alternative medicine centers.

The hallway to the cell where X5 is serving out his 8-year sentence in Ukraine.

North Koreans guilty of espionage

The two North Korean spies seen on the grainy surveillance footage are currently serving eight-year prison sentences for espionage in the Ukrainian town of Zhytomyr, 140 kilometers (87 miles) west of Kiev.
Ukrainian officials allowed CNN inside the prison facilities to see if they would grant interviews under guard supervision.
The elder inmate is a man in his fifties from the North Korean capital of Pyongyang who is known in court documents as X5. He is gaunt, compared to the fuller frame he had in the surveillance videos, and speaks lightly-accented Russian.
His younger accomplice is a technical expert known as X32.
They are the only such spies in Ukrainian custody, although officials say they have on several occasions intercepted North Korean attempts to access their missile secrets, and as a result in 2016 effectively barred all North Koreans from the country.

The door to a cell where X5 is serving his prison term.

The sting

The grainy surveillance video provided to CNN was filmed on July 27, 2011, on a hidden camera set up within a garage to capture the end of a sting operation that was months in the planning.
The two suspects can be seen moments before Ukrainian security service agents burst in and arrest them.

How 2 North Korean spies were caught

How 2 North Korean spies were caught 03:37
The Ukrainian missile experts they had been courting in the weeks before had informed on them to Ukrainian counter-intelligence agents.
As a result, authorities had detailed knowledge of the information they sought — “ballistic missiles, missile systems, missile construction, spacecraft engines, solar batteries, fast-emptying fuel tanks, mobile launch containers, powder accumulators and military government standards,” according to the court papers from their 2012 trial.
Some of the information related to the SS-24 Scalpel intercontinental ballistic missile, the court papers add. The SS-24 Scalpel, also known as the RT-23, is a solid-fueled missile capable of carrying up to 10 warheads that was launched via missile silos or railroad cars.
Why North Korea wants nukes and missiles

North Korea has long maintained it wants nuclear weapons and long-range missiles in order to deter the United States from attempting to overthrow the regime of Kim Jong Un.

Pyongyang looks at states like Iraq — where former dictator Saddam Hussein was overthrown by the United States, and Libya — the country’s late leader, Moammar Gaddafi, gave up his nuclear ambitions for sanctions relief and aid, only to be toppled and killed after the US intervened in the country’s civil unrest — and believes that only being able to threaten the US homeland with a retaliatory nuclear strike can stop American military intervention.

The mobile rail missile SS-24 system was banned in the late 1990s under the START-II treaty between the US and Russia, however the ban never came into effect. The design and production of the missile system was most recently held by Ukraine but, according to GlobalSecurity.org, the country ended production of the missile in 1995.
The Ukraine security footage gives a rare window into the elaborate and shadowy world of North Korea’s bid to improve its ability to hit the United States and other adversaries with long-range missiles.
The court documents also reveal startlingly human moments during the operation.
The two nervous men continually whisper to each other the material they seek is “secret,” and worry the flash batteries may run out on their PowerShot and Coolpix cameras as they photograph the dummy designs.
Speaking briefly to CNN in the jail where he now makes cement railings and iron rods to pass prison time, X5 confirmed he had “partially” admitted his guilt.

'X5' is seen working at a prison near Zhytomyr, Ukraine.

The court papers say he insisted his job, as a trade representative in the North Korean embassy in neighboring Belarus, was merely to arrange training in missile technology for North Korean experts — information he didn’t think was classified. He even tried to get one expert, the papers allege, to travel to North Korea and teach there.
Dressed in dark blue overalls and a cloth cap, mixing cement, X5 said he “of course” wanted to return to North Korea, and had not spoken to his family or anyone there since his arrest.
“I am serving my term of punishment. They feed us well here, we work… I don’t want to give an interview for the preservation of my safety and that of my family.”
He shares a well-lit cell with a TV with eight other convicts, and sleeps in a double bunk bed, with pots of vitamins and toiletries his only obvious possessions.

X5 shares a cell with 8 other convicts, and sleeps in a double bunk bed.

The second convict, X32, agreed to meet CNN, but immediately declined to be interviewed, covering the camera lens with his hand and walking away.
He has not admitted his guilt and is held in a more relaxed facility where he makes furniture to pass the time.
Denys Chernyshov, Ukraine’s deputy minister for justice, said the men had been met once by two officials from North Korea’s Moscow embassy, but otherwise had no contact at all with their relatives or North Korea.
“They have asked Ukrainian authorities to be extradited to North Korea to continue their sentence,” he said. “But because they are held for spying for North Korea, we obviously declined their request.”
Chernyshov added the pair were well-trained.
“To be isolated in another country and culture, with different food even, that brings about a particular stress,” he said. “So it is clear these are well prepared, strong people.”
However, he added North Korea may not turn out to be that welcoming when they likely travel home in September 2018, at the end of their sentences.
“That their task was unsuccessful, they cannot expect much of a hero’s welcome on their return.”

6,000 Plus Turkish Spies In Germany Today

(This article is courtesy of the Berlin Germany News Paper ‘The Public’)

 

International

Turkey's spy network in Germany 'thicker than Stasi's'

Photo: DPA.

Turkey’s spy network in Germany ‘thicker than Stasi’s’

Published: 24 Aug 2016 15:40 GMT+02:00
Updated: 24 Aug 2016 15:40 GMT+02:00

A security politician told Die Welt that Turkey’s MIT intelligence agency has some 6,000 informants in Germany.

For Germany’s population of about 3 million people with Turkish roots, that means that each informant could be responsible for monitoring 500 people, which is a greater proportion than the Stasi had in West Germany, intelligence expert and author Erich Schmidt-Eenboom told The Local.

In comparison, Schmidt-Eenboom explained, the Stasi had around 10,000 agents in West Germany to monitor a population of roughly 60 million – meaning 6,000 people per agent

The Ministry for State Security, also known as the Stasi, was communist East Germany’s secret police force, which secretly monitored millions until the end of the Cold War and German reunification.

But the Stasi engaged primarily in gathering military, political or economic intelligence in West Germany, rather than targeting former citizens, as MIT seems to be doing in Germany, Schmidt-Eenboom said.

“This is no longer about intelligence reconnaissance, but rather this is increasingly being used for intelligence repression,” Schmidt-Eenboom said.

Since a failed coup attempt in Turkey last month, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has been enacting mass detentions in his own country of suspected opponents, including academics, journalists and military members.

Erdogan has blamed US-based writer and preacher Muhammad Fethullah Gülen for inciting the attempted coup.

“Turkey’s internal conflicts between Gülen and Erdogan, and between Kurds and Turks have been brought into Germany, and are impacting the internal peace,” Schmidt-Eenboom told The Local.

The informants in Germany are often unpaid supporters of Erdogan, and most are working “out of a sense of patriotism,” Schmidt-Eenboom explained.

‘Turning a blind eye’

These informants are putting pressure on Kurds, Gülen supporters and others perceived as being opponents, for example by calling for boycotts on their businesses, writing negatively about them in Turkish publications, or threatening their family members.

“They can go to the regular German police to complain about it, but this is difficult to do in this kind of parallel society,” Schmidt-Eenboom said.

“The government feels that Turkey is an important partner in the refugee crisis, so they may turn a blind eye.”

Germany’s Turkish population is the largest ethnic minority in the country. Many came through a guest worker programme in the 1960s.

Tensions between the government and the Kurdish population in Turkey have also risen over the past year since a ceasefire agreement broke down with the Kurdish PKK militant group. A report recently showed that the number of Kurdish Turks seeking asylum in Germany has ballooned in the first half of this year.

Green party politician Hans-Christian Ströbele on Monday called for the German parliament (Bundestag) to discuss Germany’s cooperation with the MIT once the parliament comes back from a summer break, demanding in a statement an to end “Turkey’s subversive intelligence activities in Germany”.

Specifically Ströbele plans to place the topic on the agenda of the parliamentary committee on Turkey.

The committee chair, Clemens Binninger, agreed that the role of the MIT in Germany should be addressed as soon as possible.

Binninger, from Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservative CDU party, told Die Welt that “the recent events in Turkey have not only had an impact on the security situation, but also potentially on the collaboration of the intelligence agencies.”

Schmidt-Eenboom said it was time that German intelligence re-think its relationship with Turkey.

“Germany must reconsider working with such an intelligence agency,” he said. “People should know that this is an issue for internal security.”

For more news from Germany, join us on Facebook and Twitter.

Emma Anderson ([email protected])

This Is A Copy Paste From Today’s “The Times Of Israel”: Great Reading Material

 

Is this email not displaying correctly? View it in your browser
 
 
The Times of Israel The one-stop news site
covering Israel, the region and
the Jewish people worldwide
THE DAILY EDITION   WHAT MATTERS MOST ON » SAT, APR 16, 2016  

Share This:
Facebook Twitter More...
Visit the timesofisrael.com – updated 24/7. The Jewish world’s fastest-growing website. Click here!
 
Army boosts its deployment near Gaza, ‘completes preparations’ for possible conflict
 
Amid soaring tension, Israel drills for Hamas attack on Gaza border kibbutz
 
Extensive exercise by IDF and emergency services, the largest of its kind since 2014 war, involves troops overpowering terrorists and rescuing hostages held in community dining hall
 
By TIMES OF ISRAEL STAFF
 
Israeli troops simulate an operation to overcome terrorists with hostages, in a drill at the dining hall at Kibbutz Erez, near Gaza, April 14, 2016 (Channel 2 screenshot)
 
 
Egypt's ambassador to Israel Hazem Khairat with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Jerusalem, February 29, 2016. (Prime Ministers Office)
 
Liberman: Israel, Hamas holding negotiations via Egypt
 
By TIMES OF ISRAEL STAFF
 
Hamas chief Ismail Haniyeh waves to the crowd during an anti-Israel rally on February 26, 2016, in the southern Gaza Strip town of Rafah. (AFP/Said Khatib)
 
Hamas leader pledges to stick by ‘the rifle and the tunnel’
 
By TIMES OF ISRAEL STAFF
 
A post on the Fatah Facebook page celebrating a female terrorist. (Screen capture Palestinian Media Watch)
 
Fatah glorifies female terrorists on Facebook page
 
By TIMES OF ISRAEL STAFF
 

 
Iran aims to buy fighter jets, advanced tanks from Russia
Defense minister reportedly taking arms shopping list to his meet with Moscow counterpart later this month
 
By TIMES OF ISRAEL STAFF
Iranian Defense Minister Hassan Dehghan, right, and his Russian counterpart Sergei Shoigu attend a press conference in Tehran in January 2015. (screen capture: AFP)
 
 
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan (center) waves during the end of the closing session of the 13th Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC) Summit in Istanbul, Turkey, on April 15, 2016. (AFP/Kayhan Ozer/Pool)
 
Islamic summit raps Iran over ‘terror support’
 
By AFP
 
The head of Iran's central bank, Valiollah Seif (YouTube screenshot)
 
Iran official accuses US, EU of not honoring nuclear deal
 
By AP
 
Iranians take photos of the Simorgh satellite rocket during celebrations to mark the 37th anniversary of the Islamic Revolution, in Teheran, February 11, 2016. (AFP/Atta Kenare)
 
Amid rumors, White House rules out giving Iran access to US dollar
 
By RON KAMPEAS
 

 
Trump, you’re fired! TV contestants turn on mentor
Former ‘The Apprentice’ participants accuse Republican front-runner of being xenophobic, sexist and racist, call on voters to ditch him
 
By AFP
Former 'The Apprentice' participants Kwame Jackson and Tara Dowdell look on as former participant Dr. Randel Pinkett speaks at the 'Former Apprentices Speak Out: Donald Trump, You're Fired!' press conference at the Roosevelt Hotel in New York City, April 15, 2016. (Jemal Countess/Getty Images/AFP)
 
 
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump greets supporters at a rally in Hartford, Connecticut, on April 15, 2016. (Matthew Cavanaugh/Getty Images/AFP)
 
Daggers drawn as Trump, Cruz wage warfare
 
By MICHAEL MATHES
 
UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein, of Jordan, delivers a speech at the opening of the 27th session of the UN Human Rights Council on September 8, 2014 in Geneva. (AFP/Fabrice Coffrini)
 
UN rights chief to Trump: ‘Bigotry is not strong leadership’
 
By AFP
 
Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., waves to the crowd with his wife, Jane Sanders, during a campaign rally at the University of Wyoming in Laramie, Wyoming, on April 5, 2016. (Blaine McCartney/The Wyoming Tribune Eagle via AP)
 
Sanders releases 2014 tax return, gave 4% of income to charity
 
By CHAD DAY
 

 
One love
 
NY mosque hosts interfaith Passover seder
Jews and Muslims participating in a seder at the Islamic Society of Mid Manhattan, organized by the NYC Muslim-Jewish Solidarity Committee, April 14, 2016. (Facebook)
Manhattan house of worship hosts Jews and Muslims for one-of-a-kind pre-Pesach celebration
 
By JTA
 

 
Strauss Street (Shmuel Bar-Am)
 
From Crusaders to Nazis in a historical stroll on Jerusalem’s Straus Street
 
ISRAEL TRAVELS Centuries of war and peace, foreign rulers, religious diversity, shopping, bathing and basketball unfold on a short walk along a single street downtown
 
By AVIVA and SHMUEL BAR-AM
 
 
Virag Gulyas
 
Israel, will I ever be enough for you?
 
VIRAG GULYAS She’s in love with Israelis, learning Hebrew, and fighting BDS — but does she have a place in the Jewish state?
 

 
Efrem Goldberg
 
How much will you spend on Passover?
 
EFREM GOLDBERG Those who go the luxury Pesach route should give in kind to those for whom the holiday is too much of a luxury
 

 
Iranian MPs attend a parliament session in Tehran, March 1, 2016. (AFP/Atta Kenare)
 
New female Iranian MP ‘barred over handshake with man’
 
Powerful Guardian Council issues ban on reformist Minoo Khaleghi entering parliament over apparently unconfirmed image taken in China
 

 
The building of the Academy of the Hebrew Language in Jerusalem. (Public domain/Wikipedia)
 
Now there are Hebrew words for hashtag, shaming
 
The Academy of the Hebrew Language, custodians of the evolving language, get to grips with social media, computers and tech
 

 
Danny Cohen, former director of BBC Television (photo credit: Courtesy)
 
Ex-BBC chief: Jews voting for Corbyn is like Muslims voting for Trump
 
Danny Cohen says he does not feel Britain’s Labour party has sufficiently tackled anti-Semitic elements within it
 

 
In this April 14, 2016 image, a Syrian boy waits as his family loads their belongings onto a bus in the town of Palmyra in the central Homs province, Syria. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
 
Heartbreak as Syrians briefly return home to IS-free Palmyra
 
Scenes of people salvaging their belongings after IS is ousted highlight a present-day human tragedy largely sidelined by the destruction at nearby Roman-era ruins
 

 
Yuval Steinitz. (Miriam Alster/Flash90)
 
Minister close to PM: Turkey reconciliation deal is 90% done
 
Yuval Steinitz says agreements reached include the issue of a seaport for the Gaza Strip
 

 
Former Croatian President Ivo Josipovic lays a wreath of flowers at a memorial in Jasenovac, Croatia, on April 15, 2016. (AFP photo/Stringer)
 
Jews commemorate ‘Croatian Auschwitz,’ fearing far-right surge
 
Community says authorities have failed to respond to a revival of pro-Nazi ideology in the country
 

 
Rotterdam after the German blitz (Public Domain/Wikimedia Commons)
 
Rotterdam’s WWII letter of surrender found 70 years on
 
Dutch historian spots long-lost document on German auction site
 

 
David Gest seen with his then-wife Liza Minelli. (Screen capture YouTube)
 
Liza Minnelli’s ex-husband found dead in London
 
David Gest, former contestant on UK’s ’Celebrity Big Brother,’ was reportedly addicted to gambling in his final months
 

 
Ahmed Ferhani appears in a New York City courtroom on state level terrorism charges in March 2012. (AP/Seth Wenig)
 
Inmate who plotted NY synagogue bombings in coma after suicide attempt
 
Ahmed Ferhani’s lawyers say he was beaten and taunted over his terror conviction by guards at New York state prison
 

 
Flags of member nations flying in front of United Nations headquarters in New York, Sept. 25, 2015. (JTA/Michael Gottschalk/Photothek via Getty Images)
 
UN seeks increased transparency in selecting leader
 
Candidates for United Nations chief answer questions from diplomats as Ban Ki-moon’s term set to expire
 

 
Night view of the Castle and Charles Bridge, Prague, Czech Republic (CC BY-SA 3.0 Jorge Royan/Wikipedia)
 
Czech Republic says call us ‘Czechia’
 
Fed up with long name, officials ‘recommend using the single word’ when possible; ‘Czechia’ happens to be what Israel calls it already
 

 
 
Sign up for our Start-Up Daily newsletter!
 
Get the Start-Up Daily newsletter, free by email, for selected top stories from our 24/7 Israeli high-tech coverage
 
 
Thousands in Egypt protest transfer of islands, dozens held
 
‘Anti-regime’ demonstrators take to the streets of Cairo against deal with Saudi Arabia in first significant protest against government since Sissi’s takeover
 
By MAGGIE MICHAEL and HAMZA HENDAWI
Egyptians shout slogans against Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi during a protest against the decision to hand over control of two strategic Red Sea islands to Saudi Arabia in front of the Press Syndicate, in Cairo, Egypt, Friday, April 15, 2016. Arabic reads, "Awad sold his land" and "Red Sea islands Sanafir and Tiran are Egyptian." (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)
 

 
Israeli cabinet to meet at Golan Heights, to underline land won’t be relinquished
 
Ministers to convene on Sunday in first ever session on the strategic ridge, amid reports that world deal for Syria will demand Israel return the territory
 
By TIMES OF ISRAEL STAFF
 
Benjamin Netanyahu seen during a security and defense tour in the Golan Heights, near the Northern Israeli border with Syria. April 11, 2016. (Kobi Gideon/GPO)
 

 
Information held by Pollard ‘still top secret, could damage US’
 
Written statement by US director of national intelligence says sensitivity of material held by recently released spy justifies parole limitations, Channel 10 reports
 
By TIMES OF ISRAEL STAFF
 
Jonathan Pollard, the American convicted of spying for Israel, leaves a New York courthouse following his release from prison after 30 years, on November 20, 2015 in New York. (Spencer Platt/Getty Images/AFP)
 

 
Hard-right minister: Conditions at West Bank checkpoints ‘disgraceful’
 
Uri Ariel says Israel must improve Palestinian economy, build Gaza port: ‘We are responsible for the region’
 
By TIMES OF ISRAEL STAFF
File: Uri Ariel (Flash90)
 

 
Israel accidentally returns body of ax-wielding assailant to family
 
Despite reports of PM’s decision against practice, authorities transfer attacker’s corpse to relatives; IDF: It was a mistake
 
By TIMES OF ISRAEL STAFF
The ax a Palestinian used to attack an IDF soldier in the West Bank on April 14, 2016 (IDF spokesperson's office)
 

 
Abbas in Paris: ‘Suffocating’ Palestinians back France peace push
 
In first stop of foreign tour, PA president tells French leader that his people are suffering under occupation, settlement expansion
 
By TIMES OF ISRAEL STAFF
Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas (left) and French President Francois Hollande (right), hold a press conference after their meeting at the Elysee Palace in Paris, on April 15, 2016. (AFP/Dominique Faget)
 
 

 
Participants in activities at the Szarvas summer camp in Hungary, August 2014. (Courtesy of American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee)
 
In Hungary, a summer camp creates Jewish leaders — and couples
 
Since its founding by the JDC in 1990, Szarvas has given over 20,000 alumni from more than 30 countries a rare opportunity to meet and mingle with European Jewish youth
 
By CNAAN LIPHSHIZ
 
 

 
 
 
Pope brings 12 Syrian refugees to Italy in lesson for Europe
 
Pontiff makes ‘gesture of welcome’ during brief visit with migrants and asylum seekers at Greek detention center
 
By DEREK GATOPOULOS, NICOLE WINFIELD and ELENA BECATOROS
 
A group of Syrian refugees board a plane with Pope Francis on April 16, 2016 at the airport of Mytilene, in the Greek island of Lesbos. (AFP PHOTO POOL / FILIPPO MONTEFORTE)
 
 

 
Japan quakes kill at least 29; rescuers rush to free trapped
 
2 temblors in as many days leave up to 1,500 hurt; heavy rain threatens to complicate relief operation, set off more mudslides
 
By EMILY WANG and MARI YAMAGUCHI
A man clears away debris of a broken wall in Mashiki, Kumamoto prefecture on April 16, 2016, after a powerful earthquake hit southern Japan, the second in two days. (AFP PHOTO/KAZUHIRO NOGI)
 

 
Rapper Action Bronson, left, chowing down on some Frankel's fare with the Frankel brothers, Zach, right, and Alex in front of their New York deli. (Screenshot from Instagram/via JTA)
 
At Frankel’s NY deli, a gritty, rock-star vibe meets old-school nostalgia
 
Celebrity appeal brings Jews and Gentiles alike scrambling for sandwiches at opening of new Brooklyn bagel shop
 
By GABE FRIEDMAN
Mindculture's Blog

Rising like a blooming lotus through the mud

Diary of a Gay Dad. I am a full time dad to five young children.

People family relationships children cooking jam making and being a gay dad

المعلومات في جميع المجلات

هذا الموقع يمكنه الكلام في ما يدور في العالم

The Common Sense Theologian

Theology, Politics, Life, Education, Family, Home, Kids, Marriage, Outdoors

India Travel BLog

A Blog about Indian Tourism

Danny's wor(l)d

have a great read here!!

%d bloggers like this: