These U.S. states consume the most coffee

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

These U.S. states consume the most coffee

In 2018, Americans drank an average of 2 cups of coffee per day. The USDA forecasts 174.5 million bags of coffee will be produced in 2019 and lists the United States as the 2nd largest importer of coffee in the world. Across the country, we consume 25,835,000 bags of coffee.

We are a highly caffeinated nation.

We are merely doing our civil duty — after the Boston Tea Party, drinking coffee was a sign of patriotism. Since then, the popularity of coffee in the U.S. has only grown. The National Coffee Association’s annual report showed coffee drinking in America is at its highest levels with over 60% of all Americans consuming coffee every day.

Coffee in the Pacific Northwest

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It would be very difficult to discuss coffee in America without Seattle, Washington. Seattle might be the origin story for Starbucks, but Conde Naste doesn’t list it in their top 10 best Seattle coffee shops. Still, cities all over Washington are listed in the top 10 best cities in America for coffee lovers on many lists.

Here are some quick stats on Washington’s caffeine addiction:

Seattle, Washington:

  • 1 coffee shop per 2,308 residents
  • 278 coffee shops total

Everett, Washington:

  • 1 coffee shop per 2,752 residents
  • 40 coffee shops total

Vancouver, Washington:

  • 1 coffee shop per 2,224 residents
  • 78 coffee shops total

Travel & Leisure listed Portland, Oregon, the best coffee city due to its high number of coffee shops per capita. Portland also has the most coffee manufacturers per capita than anywhere else in the United States.

Coffee in New York City

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Frank Sinatra crooned he wanted “to wake up in the city that never sleeps.” With the most coffee shops per capita, the most donut shops per capita and the most affordable coffee shops per capita, New York fits the bill and is WalletHub’s #1 choice for “Best Coffee Cities in America.”

Coffee in California

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The west coast is a standout region for coffee drinkers. WalletHub found 4 of the top 5 cities for highest average coffee spend are in California: Fremont, Irvin, San Francisco and San Jose. California also holds 3 out of the 5 cities with the highest percentage of adult coffee drinkers as well: Anaheim, Los Angeles and Santa Ana.

Apartment Guide released a list of best cities for coffee lovers in America and Berkley was their top pick.

Coffee consumption in the Southeast

Nowhere in the southeastern corner of the U.S. makes any list of “cities with the most coffee shops” or “states with the highest coffee consumption.” The northeastern United States consumes the most coffee, according to Statista.

More coffee statistics

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  • If you love to grab coffee on the way to work, don’t move to Laredo, Corpus Christi and Garland, Texas. They have the fewest coffee shops per capita, alongside Hialeah, Florida, and San Bernardino, California.
  • Despite having so few coffee shops, Hialeah has the 3rd highest percentage of adult coffee drinkers.
  • Square analyzed data over the course of a year and found the latte is America’s most-ordered drink.
  • More than 60% of adults 18 and over consume coffee every day. And more than half of the coffee consumed is gourmet. Cold brew orders are up 42% over iced coffee.

With younger people driving the gourmet coffee market and 70% of coffee consumption happening at home, surely we can get a good Alexa-enabled coffee pot worth more than a hill of beans.

5 Biggest Chinatowns in the U.S.

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

5 Biggest Chinatowns in the U.S.

If you don’t live near a big city, you might be unfamiliar with the term “Chinatown” and its significance in American history.

The Oxford Dictionary defines a Chinatown as: “A district of a large non-Chinese town or port in which the population is predominantly of Chinese origin.” So-called Chinatowns exist all around the world, though there are particularly large concentrations in North America, Europe, and Australia.

While Chinatowns had existed in other countries for hundreds of years before making their way to the U.S., the United States features a particularly high number of Chinatowns relative to its size. Here are a few of the biggest Chinatowns you’ll find in the states.

5. Honolulu, Hawaii

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While the exact boundary (and thus, the exact population) of the Honolulu Chinatown isn’t precisely known, it deserves mention on this list for its historical role in Chinese-American culture.

One of the earlier Chinatown settlements, Chinese immigrants came to Hawaii to work the island’s rich sugar plantations. Many of these laborers stayed in the area to work as merchants, and eventually, the early boundaries of Hawaii’s first Chinatown began to form. Of course, the area wasn’t without hardship—the Honolulu Chinatown was rocked by a great fire in 1886, an outbreak of bubonic plague in 1899, and another huge blaze in 1900. But the area endured, and it stands today as the home of the largest Chinese population in Hawaii.

4. Seattle, Washington

Credit: 400tmax / iStock

Further north than most other U.S. Chinatowns, the Seattle Chinatown — more officially known as the Chinatown-International District of Seattle — is the biggest Chinese enclave in the American northwest. Home to a diverse range of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, and Vietnamese populations, the area acts as a hub of Asian culture in the region and brings in substantial tourism throughout the year.

3. Chicago, Illinois

Credit: stevegeer / iStock

The second-oldest in the United States, the Chinatown neighborhood in south Chicago is certainly worth visiting. The bulk of the Chicago Chinatown population came from immigrants fleeing persecution on the West Coast; the establishment of the San Francisco Chinatown (as detailed below) made Chinese culture a staple in America, but the immigrants there faced extensive prejudice from U.S. nationals.

In an ironic twist, U.S. citizens viewed Chinese influence as a detriment to American culture, despite the fact that American culture (not even 100 years old at that point) had its foundation in African slave labor and Native American blood. Regardless, immigrants found some relief in their newly-formed Chinatown, where it stands today as one of the most populous Chinese enclaves in the country.

2. San Francisco, California

Credit: JamesYetMingAu-Photography / iStock

The San Francisco Chinatown is possibly the largest, and certainly the oldest, Chinese enclave in America. Its origins date back to the 1850s, when large influxes of Chinese immigrants made their way to the West Coast. These immigrants typically worked hard-labor jobs, such as mining or railroad construction, and struggled to integrate into American culture. As their populations grew, so too did their enterprise, with Chinese-owned shops, restaurants, and apartments filling the town. This gentrification led to the birth of the United States’ first Chinatown, a historic landmark that exists to this day.

1. Manhattan, New York

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The Manhattan Chinatown is one of the biggest in the world, with the New York City area featuring the biggest Chinese population outside of Asia. Indeed, there are so many Chinese people there that one Chinatown can’t hold everyone; to date, there are nine different Chinatown neighborhoods in New York City alone.

This particular Chinatown is considered a bastion of Chinese culture, both in the U.S. and abroad. The region is home to the Museum of Chinese in America and is a regular destination for new Chinese immigrants coming to the country. However, in true Manhattan fashion, rent prices are skyrocketing in the area, forcing out many of the poorer populations in favor of wealthier patrons who can afford the exorbitant prices.

Going Down to Chinatown

Credit: MongkolChuewong / iStock

This list is just a small sampling of the diverse Chinatowns that exist in America. The enclaves have long been thought of as cultural oddities to natives, but to Chinese immigrants, they’re welcome reminders of the comfort and culture they left behind. And while most Chinatowns these days have experienced surges in diversity compared to what they once had, there’s no taking away from the cultural impact they’ve had on our history.

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SW Airlines Passenger Alerts Crew Of Two Texting About Child Molesting: Police Arrest Them

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

(CNN) If you see something, say something.

A woman on a Seattle-to-San Jose flight this week took that law enforcement mantra to heart when she spotted a fellow passenger allegedly texting about sexually molesting children, the San Jose police said.
She immediately alerted the crew, leading police to arrest a man and a woman on charges of sexually exploiting minors.
“I’d like to highlight that if it wasn’t for this particular passenger taking action to alert the staff and alert the police, this catastrophic event would have been horrific,” San Jose Police Sgt. Brian Spears told CNN.

The incident

The incident unfolded Monday on a Southwest Airlines flight.
The woman, who’s an early childhood educator, saw a male passenger seated in front of her texting the material, the San Jose police said.
Spears told CNN the passenger was able to take photos of the man’s text conversation because the font and screen were large.
The texts, Spears said, were “extremely disturbing.”
The woman told the flight crew, and a crew member summoned police working at the Mineta San Jose International Airport on landing.

Officers detained Michael Kellar, 56, of Tacoma, Washington, according to San Jose police.
The San Jose Police Department’s Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force (ICAC) and the FBI in San Jose responded. The task force arrested Kellar.
He was booked into the Santa Clara County Jail in California on two counts of attempt child molestation and two counts of solicitation of a sex crime, San Jose police said..

Two booked

The detectives looked at the man’s phone and found the text messaging recipient — a woman in the Tacoma area, Seattle police said.
Seattle police said there was “information that the woman had access to the children either as a caregiver or a babysitter.”
Investigators tracked the woman down to a residence in the Tacoma, Washington, area.
She lived there with her ex-husband, his wife and three children, police said.
“The detective obtained search warrants for the Tacoma home and the residence of the male suspect,” Seattle police said.

Children now safe

The woman has been identified as Gail Burnworth, 50, according to San Jose police.
She had been booked into the Pierce County jail in Washington for sexual exploitation of a minor, rape of a child 1st degree and dealing in depictions of a minor engaged in sexually explicit conduct, San Jose police said. The county corrections website on Friday listed her as no longer in custody.
Capt. Mike Edwards, commander of Seattle police Internet Crimes Against Children task force, said authorities had to release Burnworth because prosecutors didn’t get the charging documents to court within 72 hours. He said authorities need to reestablish probable cause, find her and rearrest her.
San Jose police said two young children have been identified as victims and that they are now safe.
Attempts by CNN to reach the attorneys for the accused have been unsuccessful.
The King County Prosecutor’s Office in Washington is reviewing the case for charges in Washington state and it is talking with the US Attorney’s Office to assess whether federal charges would apply.

Heavy Screen Time Rewires Young Brains, For Better And Worse

(THIS COURTESY OF NPR NEWS)

Heavy Screen Time Rewires Young Brains, For Better And Worse

Young human brains need loads of stimulation to learn and grow, pediatricians have long known. But a mouse study shows overstimulation also rewires the brain in ways that can interfere with learning.

Ippei Naoi/Getty Images

There’s new evidence that excessive screen time early in life can change the circuits in a growing brain.

Scientists disagree, though, about whether those changes are helpful, or just cause problems. Both views emerged during the Society for Neuroscience meeting in San Diego this week.

The debate centered on a study of young mice exposed to six hours daily of a sound and light show reminiscent of a video game. The mice showed “dramatic changes everywhere in the brain,” said Jan-Marino Ramirez, director of the Center for Integrative Brain Research at Seattle Children’s Hospital.

“Many of those changes suggest that you have a brain that is wired up at a much more baseline excited level,” Ramirez reported. “You need much more sensory stimulation to get [the brain’s] attention.”

So is that a problem?

On the plus side, it meant that these mice were able to stay calm in an environment that would have stressed out a typical mouse, Ramirez explained. But it also meant they acted like they had an attention deficit disorder, showed signs of learning problems, and were prone to risky behavior.

Overall, the results add to the evidence that parents should be very cautious about screen time for young children, Ramirez said. “I would minimize it.”

A more optimistic interpretation came from Leah Krubitzer, an evolutionary neurobiologists at the University of California, Davis. “The benefits may outweigh the negative sides to this,” Krubitzer said, adding that a less sensitive brain might thrive in a world where overstimulation is a common problem.

The debate came just weeks after the American Academy of Pediatrics relaxed its longstanding rule against any screen time for kids under two. And it reflected an evolution in our understanding of how sensory stimulation affects developing brains.

Researchers learned many decades ago that young brains need a lot of stimulation to develop normally. So, for a long time parents were encouraged to give kids as many sensory experiences as possible.

“The idea was, basically, the more you are exposed to sensory stimulation, the better you are cognitively,” Ramirez said.

Then studies began to suggest that children who spent too much time watching TV or playing video games were more likely to develop ADHD. So scientists began studying rats and mice to see whether intense audio-visual stimulation early in life really can change brain circuits.

Studies like the one Ramirez presented confirm that it can. The next question is what that means for children and screen time.

“The big question is, was our brain set up to be exposed to such a fast pace,” Ramirez said. “If you think about nature, you would run on the savanna and you would maybe once in your lifetime meet a lion.”

In a video game, he said, you can meet the equivalent of a lion every few seconds. And human brains probably haven’t evolved to handle that sort of stimulation, he said.

Krubitzer, and many other scientists, said they aren’t so sure. It’s true this sort of stimulation may desensitize a child’s brain in some ways, they said. But it also may prepare the brain for an increasingly fast-paced world.

“Less than 300 years ago we had an industrial revolution and today we’re using mobile phones and we interact on a regular basis with machines,” Krubitzer said. “So the brain must have changed.”

Krubitzer rejected the idea that the best solution is to somehow turn back the clock.

“There’s a tendency to think of the good old days, when you were a kid, and [say], ‘I didn’t do that and I didn’t have TV and look how great I turned out,’ ” Krubitzer said.

Gina Turrigiano, a brain researcher at Brandeis University, thinks lots of screen time may be fine for some young brains, but a problem for others.

“Parents have to be really aware of the fact that each kid is going to respond very, very differently to the same kinds of environments,” she said.

Frauds And Racist Hillary Supporters Riot Against President Elect Trump

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME NEWS)

Protesters target Trump buildings in massive street rallies

Story highlights

  • At least 13 arrested in Los Angeles for blocking highway traffic in protest of Trump
  • Anti-Trump protests have occurred in more than 25 cities

(CNN) The morning after Election Day smacked Democrats with a combination of shock and sadness.

Donald Trump would be the next US President. For thousands, disappointment turned to protest as Hillary Clinton supporters channeled their disbelief into a single defiant message.
“Not my President,” they chanted. “Not today.”
In response to Trump’s victory, a shocking win fueled by the rural roar of a dismayed white America, tens of thousands in at least 25 US cities — including New York and Nashville, Chicago and Cleveland, San Francisco and Seattle — shouted anti-Trump slogans, started fires, and held candlelight vigils to mourn the result.

Donald Trump's victory met with mixed reaction

Donald Trump’s victory met with mixed reaction 02:33
Many of those demonstrations continued early Thursday morning and led to dozens of arrests.
“People are furious, not just at the results of the election, but the rhetoric of Donald Trump,” Ahmed Kanna, an organizer for Social Alternative Berkeley, told CNN’s Don Lemon.

Demonstrations outside Trump’s properties

In New York, authorities estimated that as many as 5,000 people protested the real estate mogul’s victory outside Trump Tower. They included pop star Lady Gaga, a staunch Clinton supporter.

Lady Gaga protests against President-elect Donald Trump outside Trump Tower in New York.

Their concerns ranged from policies, such as his proposed plan to build a wall along the US-Mexican border, to the polarizing tenor of his campaign that stoked xenophobic fears.
“I came out here to let go of a lot of fear that was sparked as soon as I saw the results,” protester Nick Powers said. He said he feared Trump will support stronger stop-and-frisk policies that would put many people in prison. He also was worried that Trump’s victory would embolden sexist views.
Fifteen Trump Tower protesters were arrested Wednesday night for disorderly conduct, an NYPD spokesman said.
Protester: I wonder how much sexism was at play 02:16
In Chicago, activists marched down Lake Shore Drive — an eight-lane expressway along Lake Michigan — toward the Windy City’s Trump Tower with signs such as one that said, “I still can’t believe I have to protest for civil rights.”
CNN’s Ryan Young, who saw a few thousand people there, said many chanted vulgarities toward the President-elect.
“As a nation we thought we had come so far, but it seems like we’re taking many steps back,” one woman said. “We want to come together to change that.”
Emotional Clinton supporter: Hillary, sue the US 01:36
Meanwhile, protesters in Washington chanted “No Trump, no KKK, no fascist USA,” as they marched downtown to the Trump International Hotel. Elsewhere in the nation’s capital, an illuminated sign proclaimed that the US is “better than bigotry.”
Their cries turned profane after a solemn gathering of thousands who attended a candlelight vigil outside the White House to mourn the election loss.
“Everything that has been built up has been destroyed,” protester Brian Barto told CNN affiliate WJLA-TV. “America has failed (minorities).”
Headed into Thursday, more than a thousand protesters in Los Angeles, including young Latino protesters, rallied outside City Hall, according to CNN’s Paul Vercammen.
They chanted “I will not live in fear,” “Fight back, stand up” and “¡Si se puede!” (Spanish for “It can be done”).
Protesters also set on fire a piñata depicting the head of President-elect.
Several protesters said they feared that family or friends might be deported once Trump takes office. Brooklyn White, an 18-year-old protester who voted for Clinton, held a sign that said, “hate won’t win.”
“We can’t let it stop us,” she said. “If he’s the president then fine, but if Donald Trump is going to be it, then he has to listen.”
Early on Thursday morning, the protesters marched onto the 101 Freeway and blocked traffic. Authorities arrested at least 13 protesters, a Los Angeles Police Department spokesman said.

Donald Trump effigy burned by protesters.

Donald Trump effigy burned by protesters. 01:56
In Oakland, California, police said as many as 7,000 demonstrators took to the streets Wednesday night. By then, trash fires burned on a highway. Johnna Watson, public information officer with Oakland’s police department, said three officers were injured.
Thirty people were taken into custody and at least 11 citations were issued for vandalism, assaulting officers, unlawful assembly, failure to disperse and possession of a firearm. Police said some protesters threw Molotov cocktails, rocks, and fireworks at police officers.
A few miles away at Berkeley High School, about 1,500 students walked out of classes Wednesday morning. It was one of numerous high school walkouts that occurred nationwide following the election.

Supporters: Trump an ‘agent of change’

As anti-Trump protesters aired their grievances with the election’s outcome, supporters also came out in some places to express their enthusiasm for the President-elect.
In New York early Wednesday, groups of Trump supporters cheered his triumph outside Trump Tower. Others went to the White House late Tuesday and early Wednesday to show their support.
Nicholas Elliot, a Georgetown University student, said he was elated about Trump’s election as he compared it to the United Kingdom’s Brexit vote to leave the European Union.
“I feel pretty good, a year and a half process has ended and it ended my way,” the Texan told CNN affiliate WJLA.
JD Vance, author of the book “Hillbilly Elegy,” told CNN that Trump supporters in middle America voted for the President-elect because so few people — including the Clinton or her supporters — had paid attention to their plight.
“They see Trump as is an agent of change and agent of protest against folks who they feel have really failed in government,” Vance said.
CNN’s Marc Preston said the “Band-Aid” has been ripped off over the past 24 hours. Now comes the hard part: finding middle ground.
“All that anger that has been contained outside of Washington, D.C. and New York that we don’t see in middle America necessarily although these are urban cities, everyone’s starting to see it,” Preston said. “There is a lot of healing that has got to happen.”

MLB Once Again Disallows Free Speech: Do MLB Rules Overrule The U.S. Constitution?

(This article is courtesy of USA Today sports and the Reuters News Agency)

Mariners suspend Clevenger for remarks about protesters

Major League Baseball’s Seattle Mariners suspended catcher Steve Clevenger on Friday for posting inflammatory comments about civil unrest in Charlotte, North Carolina, that called for protesters to be “locked behind bars like animals.”

Back-up Clevenger, who has since apologized for posting the remarks on Thursday, was suspended for the last 10 games of the season without pay, the American League club said on Friday.

Two nights of street violence sprung from protests in Charlotte over the death of Keith Scott, 43, who was shot dead by a black police officer in the parking lot of an apartment complex in Charlotte on Tuesday.

Scott’s death was the latest in a long string of controversial police killings of black people by U.S. police that have stirred an intense debate on race and justice.

“Black people beating whites when a thug got shot holding a gun by a black police officer,” Clevenger tweeted on Thursday. “Haha (stuff) cracks me up! Keep kneeling for the Anthem!

“(Black Lives Matter) is pathetic once again! Obama you are pathetic once again! Everyone involved should be locked behind bars like animals!”

The Mariners on Thursday issued a statement about Clevenger’s remarks.

“The Seattle Mariners are very disappointed at the tweets posted on Steve Clevenger’s account,” the team said.

“While he is certainly free to express himself, his tweets do not in any way represent the opinions of the Seattle Mariners. We strongly disagree with the language and tone of his comments.”

Clevenger apologized hours after the Mariners’ statement.

“First and foremost I would like to apologize to the Seattle Mariners, my teammates, my family and the fans of our great game for the distraction my tweets on my personal twitter page caused when they went public earlier today,” Clevenger said.

“I am sickened by the idea that anyone would think of me in racist terms. My tweets were reactionary to the events I saw on the news and were worded beyond poorly at best and I can see how and why someone could read into my tweets far more deeply than how I actually feel.”

The 30-year-old Clevenger has not played for the Mariners since late June after suffering a broken hand and a flexor strain in his right elbow.

In 22 games this year, his only season for the Mariners, he is batting .221 with one home run and seven RBIs in 68 at-bats.