Man accused of breaking 3-month-old girl’s bones in 27 places

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE RICHMOND REGISTER)

 

Richmond, Ky. man accused of breaking 3-month-old girl’s bones in 27 places

  • Updated 
Sean Dykes (Richmond, Ky. criminal abuse suspect)
Sean Dykes (Source: Madison County Detention Center)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WDRB) — Police say a Richmond, Kentucky, man brutally attacked his 3-month-old daughter, breaking her bones in 27 places.

 

According to an arrest report, EMS was sent to a home on Keri Anne Court in Richmond, Kentucky on May 25, after someone called to report that a 3-month-old girl had sustained head injuries.

The infant was taken to the hospital, where police say physicians discovered that she was suffering from 27 bone fractures, including bones in her skull, ribs, spine, arms, legs, hands and feet. Police say she also had retinal hemorrhaging, bruises on her face, head and stomach, as well as possible internal injuries.

The infant’s father, 24-year-old Sean Dykes, was the only person who was with the girl at the time she was injured.

When officers with the Richmond Police Department confronted Dykes on Thursday, he offered an unusual defense, saying he had been under “a lot of stress” and claiming to have multiple personality disorder. Police say he told them that he went into a rage, grabbing the girl and slamming her on the bed, before blacking out.

He said the next thing he remembers was the girl having a seizure, with cuts and bruises to her head. He added that his right hand hurt.

Police say he admitted that “the only possible explanation” was that he punched the girl in the head, causing her head injuries.

He even used a teddy bear to demonstrate how he physically abused the girl, according to the police report.

“Dykes agreed that all the evidence suggested he was the one responsible for her injuries,” police wrote in the report. “He said he was sorry for abusing her and would apologize to her if he could.”

Police say the mother of the infant — Dykes’ girlfriend — told them that in March, Dykes pushed her to the floor and choked her for several seconds.

Dykes was arrested and charged with first-degree assault, second-degree assault and first-degree criminal abuse of a child under 12.

Copyright 2019 by WDRB Media. All rights reserved.

Congress Honors Berea Vet

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE RICHMOND (KY) REGISTER)

 

Congress honors Berea vet

Chester Elkin, a Berea native and decorated World War II veteran, was presented with a Congressional record at his home signed by U.S. State Rep. Andy Barr (R-Ky.). He is also a nominee for the 2019 Kentucky Veteran Hall of Fame, representing the city of Berea.

At the gathering Thursday morning, Emerson McAfee, president of the Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA) central Kentucky chapter read the record aloud to Elkin, alongside his wife of 76 years, Mary Ellen. McAfee also was the person who nominated Elkin for the hall of fame.

On March 25, Barr also read the record aloud before the House of Representatives, which gives an overview of not only Elkin’s extensive and award winning service, but his many contributions to Berea and Madison County.

The record recalled Barr standing and stating, “Madam Speaker, I rise today to honor the life of a special man, Mr. Chester Elkin, of Madison County, Kentucky. Mr. Elkin is part of a special group of heroes that served our nation during World War II … I am humbled to honor the service of Mr. Chester Elkin before the United States Congress.”

“I just asked for a letter,” McAfee said. “I never would’ve thought he would recognize him before Congress.”

Elkin was born in Wallaceton in 1919. While in high school he became the driver of the first school bus in his community, and at the age of 17, he opened a general store so the community wouldn’t have to travel as far for necessities. He also owned properties in the city, which he used to provide businesses and jobs.

He was involved with several Berea committees and organizations such as Renfro Valley Entertainment, the American Legion Post 50 and was county game warden for 30 years.

He served in the Army Air Corps from 1941 to 1946. He was stationed at an airbase in Ie Jima Island, Okinawa, leading the development of a runway for landing the aircraft. Toward the end of the war, he was in charge of receiving Japanese aircrafts and their pilots during their surrender, earning him the American Theater Medal, American Defense Medal, Asiatic Pacific Theater Medal with two bronze stars, the Good Conduct Ribbon and the Victory Medal.

“I never realized that people would ever care about what I was doing,” Elkin said. “I just did what I was told.”

Besides McAfee and Elkin’s wife, their daughter, Alvanell, Berea Mayor Bruce Fraley and Elkin’s hospice caretakers were in attendance.

Fraley, who is long standing family friends with the Elkin family, reminisced with him.

“You remember that Red’s game at Riverfront that we went to with Daddy,” he asked. “It was 1974, and I was just a boy, and I never forgot about that. Those were some of the best memories of my life.”

Elkin is looking forward to another large milestone by celebrating his 100th birthday in August, something he says that nothing will hinder him from reaching.

“With everything that I did throughout my life, I didn’t do anything that will keep me from getting to 100,” he said.

Reach Taylor Six at 624-6623 or follow her on Twitter @TaylorSixRR.

Where do the drugs go? No law for Ky coroners leaves concern

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF WKYT TV IN LEXINGTON KENTUCKY)

 

Where do the drugs go? No law for Ky coroners leaves concern
     

RICHMOND, Ky. (WKYT) – What are coroners expected to do with legal drugs after investigating a death? Even county coroners don’t know.

There is a Kentucky law that says coroners are entitled to take in their possession any evidence or anything or anything they believe contributes to cause and manner of death, which would include medications and narcotics. However, after a coroner’s investigation is complete, there’s no law saying how a coroner is supposed to dispose of the drugs.

“There could be issues. Absolutely there could be issues. You have the availability without question,” explained Madison County Coroner Jimmy Cornelison. Cornelison told WKYT’s Miranda Combs that a lot of people don’t realize that when it comes to a death investigation the coroner is the highest law enforcement authority at the scene. “So we can take anything and everything we want to take. We don’t have to have maybe a search warrant that police have to have because we’re doing a death investigation. It’s different,” he explained.

“It’s just come to our attention that the coroner now has possession of these narcotics,” explained Henry County Coroner and Kentucky Coroner’s Association Legislative Liaison James Pollard. “We’ve got 120 coroners, so we have to come up with a plan that’s not only going to dispose of these narcotics, but it’s also going to protect the coroner.” He said coroners also take narcotics at the request of the family, or in some cases, because the coroner knows the family or friends will take the drugs.

Pollard went on, “We feel like what we need to do now is get a piece of legislation put together.”

Combs asked, “Are we opening a can of worms with this?”

Pollard replied, “It may be a good can of worms to open up. And that way, let’s get everybody covered, protect everybody.”

Pollard and other coroners have started writing a draft of a law to require coroners to follow the same protocol to dispose of medications and narcotics.

Cornelison already has a protocol for his office. After the medications are counted and logged, the labels are torn off the bottles and they are taken straight to a DEA drop box. There are 178 boxes in Kentucky, in almost every county. “I’m not sitting here saying that people are doing things wrong, but if you don’t know if you’re doing them wrong, or if there’s a better way to do it, we don’t know what it is right now.”

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