West Virginia Becomes the 29th Medical Marijuana State

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE MPP WEBSITE)

West Virginia Becomes the 29th Medical Marijuana State

Apr 19, 2017 , , , , , , , ,, ,


Today, West Virginia officially became the 29th state to pass medical marijuana legislation!

Gov. Jim Justice signed the law today after the bipartisan bill passed both the Senate and House earlier this month.

While the law isn’t perfect, it’s a great start toward providing safe and legal access to medical marijuana for qualifying patients. A summary is available here.

This achievement didn’t happen overnight. In fact, MPP, along with many other advocates, has been working tirelessly to get a medical marijuana bill passed for years.

MPP released the following in a press release:

“This legislation is going to benefit countless West Virginia patients and families for years to come,” said Matt Simon of the Marijuana Policy Project, who is a West Virginia native and graduate of West Virginia University. “Medical marijuana can be effective in treating a variety of debilitating conditions and symptoms. It is a proven pain reliever, and it is far less toxic and less addictive than a lot of prescription drugs. Providing patients with a safer alternative to opioids could turn out to be a godsend for this state.”

Six states have adopted comprehensive medical marijuana laws in the past 12 months. Three of those laws, including West Virginia’s, passed through Republican-controlled legislatures. Lawmakers in Pennsylvania and Ohio approved them last April and June, respectively. The other three were approved by voters in November in states won by Donald Trump — Arkansas, Florida, and North Dakota.

“Intensifying public support and a growing body of evidence are driving the rapid growth in the number of states adopting medical marijuana laws,” Simon said. “Lawmakers are also learning about marijuana’s medical benefits from friends, family members, and constituents who have experienced them firsthand in other states. More than nine out of 10 American voters think marijuana should be legal for medical purposes. In light of this near universal support, it is shocking that some legislatures still have not adopted effective medical marijuana laws.”

Apr 19, 2017 , , , , , , , ,, ,


Today, West Virginia officially became the 29th state to pass medical marijuana legislation!

Gov. Jim Justice signed the law today after the bipartisan bill passed both the Senate and House earlier this month.

While the law isn’t perfect, it’s a great start toward providing safe and legal access to medical marijuana for qualifying patients. A summary is available here.

This achievement didn’t happen overnight. In fact, MPP, along with many other advocates, has been working tirelessly to get a medical marijuana bill passed for years.

MPP released the following in a press release:

“This legislation is going to benefit countless West Virginia patients and families for years to come,” said Matt Simon of the Marijuana Policy Project, who is a West Virginia native and graduate of West Virginia University. “Medical marijuana can be effective in treating a variety of debilitating conditions and symptoms. It is a proven pain reliever, and it is far less toxic and less addictive than a lot of prescription drugs. Providing patients with a safer alternative to opioids could turn out to be a godsend for this state.”

Six states have adopted comprehensive medical marijuana laws in the past 12 months. Three of those laws, including West Virginia’s, passed through Republican-controlled legislatures. Lawmakers in Pennsylvania and Ohio approved them last April and June, respectively. The other three were approved by voters in November in states won by Donald Trump — Arkansas, Florida, and North Dakota.

“Intensifying public support and a growing body of evidence are driving the rapid growth in the number of states adopting medical marijuana laws,” Simon said. “Lawmakers are also learning about marijuana’s medical benefits from friends, family members, and constituents who have experienced them firsthand in other states. More than nine out of 10 American voters think marijuana should be legal for medical purposes. In light of this near universal support, it is shocking that some legislatures still have not adopted effective medical marijuana laws.”

President Trump: Is He The Most Clueless Ignorant Fool To Ever Set Foot In The White House?

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

President Trump suggests anti-Semitic threats across U.S. are coming from within Jewish community

Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro said that the President suggested that threats were coming from within the Jewish community.

(OLIVIER DOULIERY / POOL/EPA)

President Trump appeared to suggest Tuesday that the wave of bomb threats against Jewish community centers across the U.S. could be coming from within the Jewish community itself, according to a Pennsylvania state lawmaker present for the comments.Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro, who was part of a group of state attorneys general meeting with Trump at the White House Tuesday, relayed Trump’s comments about the bomb threats to Buzzfeed News, explaining that the commander-in-chief seemed to indicate he felt some of the threats were being made from the inside, as part of a potential effort “to make others look bad.””He just said, ‘sometimes it’s the reverse, to make people, or to make others, look bad,'” Shapiro, a Democrat, said, repeating Trump’s alleged response to questions during the meeting about the large number of bomb threats against Jewish community centers in recent months.”It didn’t make a whole lot of sense to me,” Shapiro said of Trump’s remarks.

Bomb threats again reported at Jewish centers, including New York

Shapiro claimed Trump used the word “reverse,” “two or three times,” adding that Trump also called the threats “reprehensible” toward the beginning of his remarks.

Trump also said he would address the bomb threats during his speech Tuesday night before the joint session of Congress, according to Shapiro.

The White House disputed Shapiro’s description of Trump’s comments.

“This is not what he said or meant,” a White House spokesperson told the Daily News in an email.

Pence visits vandalized Jewish cemetery, decries anti-Semitism

“He means (he) was referring to protesters,” the spokesperson added.

Trump’s latest comments came one day after yet another wave of bomb threats hit Jewish community centers across America, including one in Staten Island.

Jewish centers in at least nine states faced threats throughout Monday morning and afternoon, causing closures and evacuations, but there were no actual attacks.

The targeted locations included three New York centers — in Staten Island, Tarrytown and New Rochelle, according to officials and center representatives. Bomb threats also came in for centers in Cherry Hill, N.J.; Providence, R.I.; Asheville, N.C.; Mobile, Ala.; Harrisburg, Pa.; Ann Arbor, Mich.; Talleyville, Del.; and Indianapolis, Ind., according to local reports.

Jewish community centers receive fourth wave of bomb threats

A spokesman for Trump, who has been criticized for not speaking out more quickly and forcefully, condemned the threats Monday afternoon.

“The President continues to condemn these, and other forms of anti-Semitic and hateful acts in the strongest terms,” said White House spokesman Sean Spicer. “No one in America should be afraid to follow the religion of their choosing freely.”

The latest calls, however, come amid another trend of anti-Semitic vandalism nationwide: In the past week, dozens of headstones at Jewish cemeteries in Philadelphia and St. Louis were vandalized. Residents in Miami Beach, Fla. on Sunday reported finding swastikas carved onto their cars.

Trump, for his part, has faced scathing criticism for having not responded earlier and more forcefully to the increasing threats.

President Trump finally denounces anti-Semitism

And Trump’s latest comments prompted another round of backlash.

Vandals pushed gravestones on their bases at Jewish cemetery in Philadelphia.

Vandals pushed gravestones on their bases at Jewish cemetery in Philadelphia.

(TOM MIHALEK/REUTERS)

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) told the Daily News that Trump’s remarks were “an absurd and obscene statement,” while the Anti-Defamation League said it was “astonished.”

“It is incumbent upon the White House to immediately clarify these remarks,” ADL CEO Jonathan Greenblatt said in a statement. “In light of the ongoing attacks on the Jewish community, it is also incumbent upon the President to lay out in his speech tonight his plans for what the federal government will do to address this rash of anti-Semitic incidents.”

New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman tweeted he was, “sadly not surprised – but certainly disturbed – by Pres.Trump’s apparent claim that threats against Jews are false flags.”

Trump acknowledging rampant anti-Semitism won’t make it disappear

“If the reports are true, President Trump has gone over the Anti-Semitic deep end,” Steven Goldstein, the executive director of the Anne Frank Center, said in a statement.”

“Mr. President, have you no decency? To cast doubt on the authenticity of Anti-Semitic hate crimes in America constitutes Anti-Semitism in itself, and that’s something none of us ever dreamed would disgrace our nation from the White House,” Goldstein added. “If the reports are true, you owe the American Jewish community an apology.”

Members of Trump’s inner circle have also faced similar criticism.

Earlier Tuesday, a former Trump campaign adviser, Anthony Scaramucci, posted an ambiguous screed to his Twitter wall that appeared to connect the recent bomb threats to Democratic lawmakers.

“It’s not yet clear who the #JCC offenders are. Don’t forget @TheDemocrats effort to incite violence at Trump rallies,” Scaramucci tweeted, along with a link to a story from alt-new site Breitbart alleging that Democrats had hired “trained provocateurs to instigate violence at Republican events” during the 2016 campaign.

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Pennsylvania state police fatally shoot suspect in trooper’s death

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN NEWS)

Pennsylvania state police fatally shoot suspect in trooper’s death

Trooper Landon Weaver of the Pennsylvania State Police was shot and killed Friday while on duty.

Story highlights

  • Nearly 100 law enforcement members sought the suspect
  • Trooper Landon Weaver was fatally shot while responding to a call

(CNN)A 32-year-old man suspected of killing a Pennsylvania state trooper was shot to death by law enforcement officers Saturday, Pennsylvania State Police Capt. David Cain said.

Jason Robison was wanted in connection with the shooting death of Trooper Landon Weaver, 23, on Friday. Nearly 100 members of law enforcement — from game commissioners to FBI agents — participated in the search before troopers found Robison at about 10 a.m. Saturday near the shooting site in central Pennsylvania, Cain told reporters.
Robison refused to surrender and threatened the troopers before being shot, Cain said.
“Faced with a deadly situation, troopers were forced to discharge their weapons,” he said.
“Trooper Weaver was interviewing the suspect inside the residence when the suspect gained access to a firearm and shot Trooper Weaver,” Cain said.
On its Facebook page, Pennsylvania State Police said Weaver was “tragically shot and killed while investigating a domestic-related incident.”
Weaver, who enlisted as a state trooper in December 2015, is the 97th member of the Pennsylvania State Police to be killed in the line of duty, the state police’s Facebook page said.
Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf offered his condolences in a statement released Friday.
“Landon will always be remembered for his bravery, his sacrifice, and his willingness to serve,” Wolf said.

Heroine Overdoses In America An Epidemic: Many Young Children With Dead Parents

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON POST)

A 7-year-old told her bus driver she couldn’t wake her parents. Police found them dead at home.

October 5 at 6:46 AM

7-year-old told her bus driver she couldn’t wake her parents. Police found them dead at home.

Two parents were found dead of suspected drug overdoses after their 7-year-old child told her bus driver she couldn’t wake them, according to authorities in McKeesport, Pa. (WPXI)

For more than a day, the 7-year-old girl had been trying to wake her parents.

Dutifully, she got dressed in their apartment outside Pittsburgh on Monday morning and went to school, keeping her worries to herself. But on the bus ride home, McKeesport, Pa., police say, she told the driver she’d been unable to rouse the adults in her house.

Inside the home, authorities found the bodies of Christopher Dilly, 26, and Jessica Lally, 25, dead of suspected drug overdoses, according to police.

Also inside the home were three other children — ages 5 years, 3 years and 9 months.

The children were unharmed but still taken to a hospital to be checked out, then placed with the county’s department of children, youth and families.

The case cast a light on Allegheny County’s epidemic of drug overdoses — and their impact on families.

“There is an opioid overdose epidemic in the U.S., and Allegheny County is not immune,” county health officials said in a recent report.

There were 422 opioid-overdose deaths in Allegheny County last year, according to the report — the largest death toll in county history. “And the upward trend continues.”

The report noted that Allegheny County, which includes McKeesport and the city of Pittsburgh, “has experienced fatal overdose rates higher than those seen throughout Pennsylvania and many other states” during the past decade.

Illustrating their point, authorities told NBC affiliate WPXI that the double overdose at the 7-year-old’s home was the second they had responded to on that block in less than a day.

Speaking before the state legislature last week in Harrisburg, Gov. Tom Wolf (D) told lawmakers that the opioid epidemic facing Pennsylvania is “a public health crisis, the likes of which we have not before seen. Every day, we lose 10 Pennsylvanians to the disease of addiction. This disease does not have compassion, or show regard for status, gender, race or borders.

“It affects each and every Pennsylvanian, and threatens entire communities throughout our commonwealth. The disease of addiction has taken thousands of our friends and family members. In the past year alone we lost over 3,500 Pennsylvanians — a thousand more lives taken than the year before.”

Wolf added that “addiction too often is an invisible problem. … But in Pennsylvania the problem is visible: In the lives lost. The families broken. The communities shaken.”

Nationwide, opioids such as heroin and prescription pain relievers killed more than 28,000 people in 2014, more than any year on record, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. At least half of all opioid overdose deaths involved a prescription drug, the CDC said, adding that the number of overdose deaths involving opioids has nearly quadrupled nationwide since 1999.

Behind the grim statistics are haunting scenes of overdose victims — and the children affected by their parents’ addictions.

Last month, a Family Dollar store employee in Massachusetts recorded a toddler in pink pajamas crying and pulling on her unconscious mother, who had overdosed and collapsed in the toy aisle.

The mother, who survived, was charged with child endangerment. Her daughter was placed under the care of child protective services.

Toddler tries desperately to wake mother who collapsed in store

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The woman collapsed in an apparent overdose at a Family Dollar store in Lawrence, Mass., is expected to be charged with child endangerment. (Editor’s note: This video may be disturbing to viewers.) (Lawrence Police Department)

Also last month, authorities in the Ohio city of East Liverpool released a photo of a man and a woman overdosing inside a vehicle that police said had been moving erratically. The driver was barely conscious; the passenger was turning blue. In the back: a 4-year-old boy restrained in a car seat.

Someone at the scene snapped a photo of the gruesome scene and the city posted it on its Facebook page “to show the other side of this horrible drug.”

And a photo of a Birmingham, Ala., police officer comforting a 1-month-old girl in a tiny purple gingham dress raced around the Internet after her father died of an apparent drug overdose and her mother was found near death.

The officer in the picture, Michelle Burton, told The Washington Post about the moment that night that saddened her the most. The couple’s 7-year-old daughter asked the officer to sign her homework so she could turn it in at school the next day.

“That broke my heart,” Burton said. “She said, ‘I did my work.’ She pulled it out and showed it to us. It was math homework — ‘Which number is greater? Which number is odd or even?’ … I told her, ‘Sweetie, you probably won’t have to go to school tomorrow. … But where you’re going is going to have everything you need.’ ”

She added: “It was horrible. It was a very sad situation.”

In Pennsylvania’s Lycoming County, coroner Charles Kiessling started recording the manner-of-death classification in most drug-overdose deaths as homicides earlier this year.

A lot was already being done to curb heroin use in his community, Kiessling told The Post — but using an accidental-death classification for an overdose felt as if he was “sweeping the problem under the carpet, to a certain extent.”

“They’re not accidental deaths,” Kiessling said. “They’re homicides. Drug dealers are murderers. They need to be prosecuted as murderers.”

Homicide is defined as the death of an individual at the hands of another, Kiessling said; when he thought about drug deaths, the victims were dying at the hands of a dealer or supplier.

“You’re killing people if you’re selling drugs,” he said.

In March, at the National Prescription Drug Abuse and Heroin Summit, President Obama called opioid abuse and overdose deaths “heartbreaking,” adding: “I think the public doesn’t fully appreciate yet the scope of the problem.”

Uninformed Obama Wants (1st) Gay Monument Built: Walt Whitman Bridge Is Already 1st Monument To Gay Man

 

This morning I read an article on my Google-News that President Obama wants to create a ‘green space’ in New York City’s Greenwich Village area and create a monument to Gay men. Evidently this area is considered the original beginning location of the ‘Gay Movement’ here in America. The article informed me that to this day this is an area that is frequented by men of this lifestyle so I guess that if a ‘Monument’ need’s to be built to celebrate anyone’s sexual life style this is as good a spot as any. Personally I do not believe that any monument to anyone’s sexual lifestyle should be or needs to be built unless a person wants to build one on their own property that they themselves pay for. Yet today my article is not about these men’s lifestyle, it is about calling this future monument ‘the first’, it is not the first. Does our President not know that there is already a monument to a very Gay American that is almost 12,000 feet long that took four years to build?

 

This ‘monument’ that I speak of is called the Walt Whitman Bridge that spans the Delaware River on the south side of Philadelphia Pa. to Gloucester City New Jersey. Ever since I attended college and learned about this man it has ticked me off that he of all people has any public thing named after him. I am not saying this because he was a gay person I say this because I happened to pick his name out of many names in American history to make a history report on. I knew of Mr. Whitman because of that bridge as I had crossed it a couple of hundred times while driving a truck for a living but until I started digging into this mans life did I know of his sexual orientation. The issue here is the things I found out about him personally that just turns my proverbial stomach.

 

Throughout Mr. Whitman’s life he very plainly preferred young men and very very young men. This report that I mentioned that I had to write I titled it “Walt Whitman The Pedophile Poet”. The reason wasn’t his explicit homosexual rantings he called poems in his self published book Leaves Of Grass, it was because of his actions that literally caused him to be physically chased out of the state of New Jersey by angry parents. You see, when he was a young man in New Jersey he chose to be an elementary school teacher. In just two years he had worked at five different schools and he was chased away all five times by the towns people and these kids parents. The fifth time the people literally chased him out of the State of New Jersey across the Delaware River into Pennsylvania. Why would you honestly think that he would have been ran out of the state and out of all of those towns and schools? This is why I say that America already has a “monument” to a gay man. If this man had lived in the 20th or 21st centuries he would have either been lynched (which is rather obvious what would have happened to him if he hadn’t escaped those N.J. parents), or he would have spent his life in the American prison system. It is like saying that I do not have a problem with America having a female President but saying about Ms. Hillary, just not that woman. I honestly believe that we as a nation can do better than Ms. Hillary for our first woman President and I believe that we can do better than to name a ‘monument’ after a better person than Walt Whitman.

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