Tenea, the lost ancient city built by Trojan Prisoners Has Been Found

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF USA TODAY)

 

Tenea, the lost ancient city built by Trojan prisoners, is found for the first time

LINKEDIN COMMENT MORE

Greek archaeologists discovered for the first time remnants of the long-lost ancient city of Tenea, Greece’s culture ministry said this week.

Having been previously documented only in ancient texts, Tenea was excavated in the southern region of Peloponnese, and the dig uncovered “proof of the existence of the ancient city,” the ministry said in a statement Tuesday.

Tenea is believed to have been a city settled by Trojan prisoners permitted to build their own city after the Trojan War. Past digs have found clues near the city, but the most recent excavation uncovered the “city’s urban fabric,” including floors, walls and door openings, the culture ministry said.

Taking place from September to early October, the excavation found remnants of residences, pottery, coins and tombs, among other discoveries.

“It is significant that the remnants of the city, the paved roads, the architectural structure, came to light,” lead archaeologist Elena Korka told CNN. “We’ve found evidence of life and death … and all this is just a small part of the history of the place.”

More: Archaeologists opened a mysterious Egyptian sarcophagus. Here’s what they found

More: Strange ancient animal fossil is the oldest on record, scientists say

Korka also told CNN that her team found child burials, a key clue to determining they had uncovered residences because only children were buried in buildings during Roman times.

Korka and her team had been digging in the area since 2013, but only in nearby cemeteries, she told the Associated Press.

This recent excavation also indicated that the city experienced economic prosperity under Roman rule. The city had been believed to survive Rome’s invasion of nearby Corinth.

Specifically, coins discovered in the dig dated to the era of Roman emperor Septimius Severus, who ruled from 193 to 211, indicating economic success, the ministry said.

“The citizens seem to have been remarkably affluent,” Korka told the Associated Press.

More: Oldest weapons discovered in North America tell us more about first Americans, researchers say

More: Extinct gibbon discovered in an ancient tomb. It might have been a pet.

However, archaeologists determined that the city was likely damaged by Visigoths between 396 and 397 and abandoned some 200 years later during Slavic raids, the ministry said.

Korka and her team plan to continue their excavation work moving forward to uncover more of the city’s history.

Contributing: The Associated Press. Follow Ryan Miller on Twitter @RyanW_Miller

LINKEDIN COMMENT MORE
UPHINDIA

Knowledge at your Fingertips

Joel C. Rosenberg's Blog

Tracking events and trends in Israel, the U.S., Russia and throughout the Epicenter (the Middle East & North Africa)

Operas and cycling and whatnot

Get on your bike … and ride to the opera house.

Zenbabytravel

London lifestyle & travels with kids and babies

David and Keng on the Road

Full-time RVing, Hiking, and Traveling

From Cave Walls

Beyond 365 Days - The Journey Continues

Sagar Samy

Media Blogger & Social Media influencer

MXCHELLEEX by Michelle Sanders

Postcards From Around The World

JOVIAL

It's all about life and it's glory. No negativity in it though it always remains in everyone's life.It is our duty to make sure that negativity doesn't stop us from living a life of King Size.

%d bloggers like this: