2 Citizens With Legal Guns Stop A Massacre At A Oklahoma City Restaurant

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON POST)

 

Jennifer Stong hugs Tasha Hunt outside the scene of a shooting on the east side of Lake Hefner in Oklahoma City. (Bryan Terry/The Oklahoman, via AP)

A man who believed he had been under demonic attacks drove to an Oklahoma restaurant and indiscriminately fired at a crowd, injuring three people, authorities say.

Alexander C. Tilghman, 28, was shot and killed by two citizens minutes after he arrived Thursday evening at Louie’s Grill & Bar, a lakeside restaurant in Oklahoma City, police spokesman Capt. Bo Mathews said. Tilghman stood at the restaurant’s entrance with a handgun and fired from the door before two men shot him, putting an end to “a very dangerous situation,” Mathews told reporters at a news conference Friday.

“You can say they are heroes, which is a very good thing to say … Heroes is a great terminology. I just say they were two people who stopped a very tragic situation from going any further,” Mathews said.

The two citizens, Carlos Nazario, 35, and Bryan Wittle, 39, were not armed, but they rushed to the trunks of their vehicles to grab their handguns as Tilghman began shooting. The two men will probably not face any charges because they were protecting other people’s lives, Mathews told reporters.

Three people, 39-year-old Natalie Giles and two girls, were shot but are in good condition, police said. A fourth person broke his arm amid the chaos.

The shooting appears to be a random act of violence, police said.

“It doesn’t look like he knew anybody at the restaurant. He didn’t work at the restaurant … This is an ongoing investigation. That could change,” Mathews said.

The shooting happened amid what has become a national epidemic of high-profile shootings. Just a week earlier, a gunman killed 10 and wounded at least 10 others at a Texas high school. On Friday, a middle school student opened fire inside an Indiana classroom, wounding a classmate and a teacher, who swatted the gun out of his hand. A Washington Post analysis found that since 1999, shootings during school hours have killed at least 141 students, educators and other people, with another 284 injured.

The incident at the Oklahoma restaurant energized the National Rifle Association, which immediately seized on the moment Friday, saying the actions of the two men are “just another example of how the best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.”

NRA

@NRA

✅ An saved multiple lives last night in . We hope this serves as a wake-up call for @GovMaryFallin, who just two weeks ago vetoed a constitutional carry bill. Just another example of how the best way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun.

The powerful lobbying group also criticized Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin (R), who had vetoed a permit-less carry bill despite pressure from gun-rights advocates in the gun-friendly state.

The bill, which Oklahoma’s House and Senate overwhelmingly passed, would have allowed gun owners who are at least 21 years old and military service members or veterans who are at least 18 years old to carry firearms, concealed or unconcealed, without a permit. A dozen other states have constitutional carry laws.

In a statement announcing her veto on May 11, Fallin, a Republican, pointed to two aspects of the bill: It would have eliminated the requirement for firearms safety training and would have reduced the level of background checks.

Fallin said she supports the right to own and carry firearms, openly or concealed, but that the bill would not allow law enforcement to distinguish between those who have been trained and vetted to carry guns and those who have not.

Tilghman, the restaurant shooter, does not have an extensive history with police, whose last contact with him was in 2003. Mathews said he’s not aware of any “mental health problems,” though he added that “in an act like this, you would have to assume that he probably had a little bit of mental illness.”

Several videos on social media show a pattern of troubling behavior. Seven months before the shooting, Tilghman posted a Facebook video saying “Satan has taken over” his television. In the 36-minute clip, Tilghman can be heard flipping through random channels, at one point saying the demonic episodes were “a lot worse” than before.

In another video shared by KOCO 5 News, Tilghman said that he’s “been going through a lot of demonic attacks recently,” and that he has not heard “from any real people.”

In a 22-second video circulating on Twitter, Tilghman talked about “transsexual clones.”

Fox affiliate KOKH reported that Tilghman had posted videos of himself in a local zoo, talking about a demon-possessed squirrel that he said had been following him. Weeks before the shooting, Tilghman recorded a video near Oklahoma City’s Lake Hefner and claimed that Satan was making the sounds of driving cars louder.

A man who was not named but said he is Tilghman’s brother told KOCO 5 News that the shooting would have been avoided had Tilghman received the help he needed.

“Nobody reached out to him, you know. He was crying for me. I was like the only one, and a few other people. This tragedy could’ve been avoided. Me and my whole family and even his friends all thought that he should be put into a behavioral unit,” the man said, speaking to a reporter through a closed window of a home.

It’s unclear whether Tilghman had access to mental health treatment.

Read more:

Students: Teacher swatted guns away, tackled accused school shooter while suffering 3 gunshot wounds

Two Florida sheriff’s deputies shot to death through restaurant window

The terrible numbers that grow with each mass shooting

More states are allowing people to carry concealed handguns without a permit

Do You Actually Own Anything: Or Does The U.S.Federal Government Own It/You?

(This article is courtesy of OPB TV and Radio of eastern Oregon)

News | Nation | Local | An Occupation In Eastern Oregon

‘This Land Is Our Land’: The Movement Bigger Than The Bundys

The Pacific Patriots Network surrounded the Harney County Courthouse in January, where they met with Sheriff Dave Ward.

The Pacific Patriots Network surrounded the Harney County Courthouse in January, where they met with Sheriff Dave Ward.

Dave Blanchard/OPB

OPB’s Conrad Wilson and the Oregonian/OregonLive’s Maxine Bernstein update us on the last full week of the government’s case against the Malheur refuge occupiers.

Then, we take a look at the so-called Patriot Movement — a loosely connected network of organizations that are united in the belief the federal government has overstepped its authority.

Mark Potok is a senior fellow with the Southern Poverty Law Center. His job is to monitor groups that are a part of what he calls the “extreme right.” That includes everything from racist groups like the KKK and to groups like the Bundys, whose concerns revolve around severe distrust of the federal government.

Potok says many people in the groups he tracks believe there is “a secret plan to impose draconian gun control on all Americans” and “those who resist the coming seizure will be thrown into concentration camps that have been secretly built by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.”

SPLC has identified nearly 1,000 groups across the country with these kinds of beliefs and connects the groups to the philosophies that motivated the Ruby Ridge standoff in Idaho; the Waco, Texas, siege; and the Oklahoma City bombing.

Potok says there is a way to curb the movement.

“In the late ‘90s, the FBI made quite an effort … to meet with militiamen, to go out to have coffee to talk to these people about their concerns and fears, and in fact I think there’s a fair amount of evidence to suggest that was quite effective,” Potok said. “You realize the person you’re having coffee with is an actual human being just like you are.”uge

 

Joseph Rice is the head of the Josephine County chapter of the Oath Keepers — a group that Potok sees as central to so-called patriot groups. But Rice thinks SPLC is uninformed about his group.

“I’ve never spoken to those folks,” he said.

Rice was in Harney County when Ammon Bundy led a group to occupy the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, but Rice and his group didn’t join the occupation. Instead, he and a group of like-minded organizations known as the “Pacific Patriots Network” stuck around to provide security in town. The group said it was there to prevent another Waco or Ruby Ridge-like incident.

Those incidents, he says, were “lessons in history.” The individuals involved in those incidents “were living their life as they chose to live freely, without impact to others. It was only when the federal government came in they had impact, and that resulted in loss of life.”

Though he didn’t endorse it, Rice insists that the takeover of the refuge was an act of civil disobedience. And while he disagrees with the charges against Ammon Bundy and the other defendants, he does think the incident has drawn attention to issues around the federal control of land, which could be good for the aims of his group.

Subscribe To ‘This Land Is Our Land’

Subscribe to “This Land Is Our Land” on NPR One, iTunes or wherever you find your podcasts. Find comprehensive trial coverage at OPB.org/ThisLand.

Share your thoughts on the trial with us on Facebook and Twitter, or by emailing us directly at [email protected].

Oklahoma Fracking And Shaking: Should The Oil Companies Have To Pay For All The Collateral Damages?

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF FOX NEWS)

Magnitude 5.0 earthquake shakes Oklahoma, felt in St. Louis

m5-3-3km-w-of-cushing-oklahoma-2016-11-06-20-17-43CUSHING, OK – A magnitude 5.0 earthquake struck Sunday evening near Cushing, Oklahoma.  It rattled several surrounding states in the U.S. heartland, according to the US Geological Survey.  The quake occurred at 7:44pm CST.

A 5.6 magnitude earthquake struck Pawnee, Oklahoma in September.  People in  at least six surrounding states felt that tremor.

A recent report released by the USGS showed that people in parts of Texas and Oklahoma now face similar ground-shaking risks from human-induced activity, such as fluid injection or extraction, as residents face from natural earthquakes in California.

The agency outlined the risk of these so-called “induced” earthquakes, noting that Oklahoma City and the surrounding region face a 5 to 12% chance of damage from an earthquake in 2016.

Magnitude of Cushing, OK earthquake re-calculated at 5.0. I’ve updated our @FOX2now graphic. Some damage, but no injuries in Cushing.

With earthquakes in the central and eastern United States, “the ground is softer, so the seismic waves have a much farther travel distance then an earthquake in California or Nevada,” said Robert Sanders, USGS geophysicist.

The USGS sent this tweet about the quake:

USGS reports a M5.3 Oklahoma on 11/7/16 @ 1:44:24 UTC

Husband felt it in St. Louis

More information about the quake from the USGS:

Most of North America east of the Rocky Mountains has infrequent earthquakes. Here and there earthquakes are more numerous, for example in the New Madrid seismic zone centered on southeastern Missouri, in the Charlevoix-Kamouraska seismic zone of eastern Quebec, in New England, in the New York – Philadelphia – Wilmington urban corridor, and elsewhere. However, most of the enormous region from the Rockies to the Atlantic can go years without an earthquake large enough to be felt, and several U.S. states have never reported a damaging earthquake.

Earthquakes east of the Rocky Mountains, although less frequent than in the West, are typically felt over a much broader region than earthquakes of similar magnitude in the west. East of the Rockies, an earthquake can be felt over an area more than ten times larger than a similar magnitude earthquake on the west coast. It would not be unusual for a magnitude 4.0 earthquake in eastern or central North America to be felt by a significant percentage of the population in many communities more than 100 km (60 mi) from its source. A magnitude 5.5 earthquake in eastern or central North America might be felt by much of the population out to more than 500 km (300 mi) from its source. Earthquakes east of the Rockies that are centered in populated areas and large enough to cause damage are, similarly, likely to cause damage out to greater distances than earthquakes of the same magnitude centered in western North America.

Most earthquakes in North America east of the Rockies occur as faulting within bedrock, usually miles deep. Few earthquakes east of the Rockies, however, have been definitely linked to mapped geologic faults, in contrast to the situation at plate boundaries such as California’s San Andreas fault system, where scientists can commonly use geologic evidence to identify a fault that has produced a large earthquake and that is likely to produce large future earthquakes. Scientists who study eastern and central North America earthquakes often work from the hypothesis that modern earthquakes occur as the result of slip on preexisting faults that were formed in earlier geologic eras and that have been reactivated under the current stress conditions. The bedrock of Eastern North America is, however, laced with faults that were active in earlier geologic eras, and few of these faults are known to have been active in the current geologic era. In most areas east of the Rockies, the likelihood of future damaging earthquakes is currently estimated from the frequencies and sizes of instrumentally recorded earthquakes or earthquakes documented in historical records.

Induced Seismicity

As is the case elsewhere in the world, there is evidence that some central and eastern North America earthquakes have been triggered or caused by human activities that have altered the stress conditions in earth’s crust sufficiently to induce faulting. Activities that have induced felt earthquakes in some geologic environments have included impoundment of water behind dams, injection of fluid into the earth’s crust, extraction of fluid or gas, and removal of rock in mining or quarrying operations. In much of eastern and central North America, the number of earthquakes suspected of having been induced is much smaller than the number of natural earthquakes, but in some regions, such as the south-central states of the U.S., a significant majority of recent earthquakes are thought by many seismologists to have been human-induced. Even within areas with many human-induced earthquakes, however, the activity that seems to induce seismic activity at one location may be taking place at many other locations without inducing felt earthquakes. In addition, regions with frequent induced earthquakes may also be subject to damaging earthquakes that would have occurred independently of human activity. Making a strong scientific case for a causative link between a particular human activity and a particular sequence of earthquakes typically involves special studies devoted specifically to the question. Such investigations usually address the process by which the suspected triggering activity might have significantly altered stresses in the bedrock at the earthquake source, and they commonly address the ways in which the characteristics of the suspected human-triggered earthquakes differ from the characteristics of natural earthquakes in the region.

Do You Actually Own Anything: Or Does The U.S.Federal Government Own It/You?

(This article is courtesy of OPB TV and Radio of eastern Oregon)

News | Nation | Local | An Occupation In Eastern Oregon

‘This Land Is Our Land’: The Movement Bigger Than The Bundys

The Pacific Patriots Network surrounded the Harney County Courthouse in January, where they met with Sheriff Dave Ward.

The Pacific Patriots Network surrounded the Harney County Courthouse in January, where they met with Sheriff Dave Ward.

Dave Blanchard/OPB

OPB’s Conrad Wilson and the Oregonian/OregonLive’s Maxine Bernstein update us on the last full week of the government’s case against the Malheur refuge occupiers.

Then, we take a look at the so-called Patriot Movement — a loosely connected network of organizations that are united in the belief the federal government has overstepped its authority.

Mark Potok is a senior fellow with the Southern Poverty Law Center. His job is to monitor groups that are a part of what he calls the “extreme right.” That includes everything from racist groups like the KKK and to groups like the Bundys, whose concerns revolve around severe distrust of the federal government.

Potok says many people in the groups he tracks believe there is “a secret plan to impose draconian gun control on all Americans” and “those who resist the coming seizure will be thrown into concentration camps that have been secretly built by the Federal Emergency Management Agency.”

SPLC has identified nearly 1,000 groups across the country with these kinds of beliefs and connects the groups to the philosophies that motivated the Ruby Ridge standoff in Idaho; the Waco, Texas, siege; and the Oklahoma City bombing.

Potok says there is a way to curb the movement.

“In the late ‘90s, the FBI made quite an effort … to meet with militiamen, to go out to have coffee to talk to these people about their concerns and fears, and in fact I think there’s a fair amount of evidence to suggest that was quite effective,” Potok said. “You realize the person you’re having coffee with is an actual human being just like you are.”uge

 

Joseph Rice is the head of the Josephine County chapter of the Oath Keepers — a group that Potok sees as central to so-called patriot groups. But Rice thinks SPLC is uninformed about his group.

“I’ve never spoken to those folks,” he said.

Rice was in Harney County when Ammon Bundy led a group to occupy the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, but Rice and his group didn’t join the occupation. Instead, he and a group of like-minded organizations known as the “Pacific Patriots Network” stuck around to provide security in town. The group said it was there to prevent another Waco or Ruby Ridge-like incident.

Those incidents, he says, were “lessons in history.” The individuals involved in those incidents “were living their life as they chose to live freely, without impact to others. It was only when the federal government came in they had impact, and that resulted in loss of life.”

Though he didn’t endorse it, Rice insists that the takeover of the refuge was an act of civil disobedience. And while he disagrees with the charges against Ammon Bundy and the other defendants, he does think the incident has drawn attention to issues around the federal control of land, which could be good for the aims of his group.

Subscribe To ‘This Land Is Our Land’

Subscribe to “This Land Is Our Land” on NPR One, iTunes or wherever you find your podcasts. Find comprehensive trial coverage at OPB.org/ThisLand.

Share your thoughts on the trial with us on Facebook and Twitter, or by emailing us directly at [email protected].

Geek Mamas

A Parenting and Lifestyle Blog with a Dash of Geek

STAY AT HOME MOM

Be an observer, and rock your life....

Theory of Decadence

America from the perspective of an exceedingly average American

Cărți Analogii Antologii

Blog Marius Andrei : cărți filme recenzii analogii antologii

ARHEOLOGIA RELIGIEI

"La început era Cuvântul...și apoi a fost scris ca să ne învețe, să ne mustre, să ne dea înțelepciune pentru a fi desăvârșiți !"

anita dawes and jaye marie

words, glorious words...

%d bloggers like this: