6 Longest Rivers in the World

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

6 Longest Rivers in the World

Determining the world’s longest river is more challenging than you might think. There’s often debate over where a river actually starts. With that in mind, we looked into the most agreed-upon top six longest rivers in the world. Here they are.

Yellow River

Credit: Jixin YU/Shutterstock

The Yellow River, also known as the Huang He, is the sixth longest river in the world and the second longest in China. The river measures 3,395 miles long, and runs from the Bayan Har Mountains in Western China to the Bohai Sea. While the Yellow River was the birthplace of ancient Chinese culture, it has also caused deadly floods and is responsible for several natural disasters.

Yenisei River

Credit: Evgeny Vorobyev/Shutterstock

The Yenisei River in Siberia measures 3,445 miles long. Starting in Lake Baikal, the river eventually makes its way to the Arctic Ocean. The Yenisei is one of the three great Siberian rivers, which also includes the Ob and the Lena.

Mississippi River

Credit: f11photo/Shutterstock

The fourth largest river in the world, the 3,902-mile-long Mississippi River runs from northern Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico. The area where the river meets the sea is known as the Mississippi River Delta. More than just a straight shot dividing the country, the Mississippi is part of the largest river system in North America.

Yangtze River

Credit: martinho Smart/Shutterstock

Not only is the Yangtze river the third longest river in the world, but it is also the longest river in Asia at 3,917 miles. It also happens to be the longest to flow through one country, as the entire river is located within China. As much as one third of the Chinese population resides within the Yangtze River basin.

Amazon River

Credit: Johnny Lye/Shutterstock

Though a collection of scientists believe the Amazon to be the longest river in the world, confusion over where the river actually begins places it second on this list.

The currently agreed upon length is around 3,976 miles, though, like we mentioned, some say the river is longer. If currently argued values are proven and accepted, the river could be as long as 4,435 miles.

Nile River

Credit: Marcelo Alex/Shutterstock

Though it may one day be displaced from its throne by the Amazon, the Nile is currently considered to the longest river in the world, with a generally agreed upon length of around 4,132 miles. This figure could be even longer, actually, with some saying the true length of the river is 4,405 miles.

The Nile is widely known for providing water to Egypt, but is also shared by Sudan, South Sudan, Burundi, Rwanda, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Tanzania, Kenya, Ethiopia and Uganda.

Egypt’s Sisi Opens Huge Suspension Bridge over the Nile

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SAUDI NEWS AGENCY ASHARQ AL-AWSAT)

 

Egypt’s Sisi Opens Huge Suspension Bridge over the Nile

Wednesday, 15 May, 2019 – 11:15
Egyptian President Abdul Fattah al-Sisi. (Reuters)
Asharq Al-Awsat
Egyptian President Abdul Fattah al-Sisi on Wednesday opened a suspension bridge over the Nile touted as the world’s widest, one of a series of military-led, mega-projects designed to improve infrastructure and provide jobs.

The bridge, which crosses the Nile just north of central Cairo, is a key link in a highway stretching from the Red Sea in the east to Egypt’s northwestern Mediterranean coast, and is meant to help reduce congestion in the capital.

Traffic ground to a halt in parts of central Cairo on Wednesday morning as Sisi traveled to open the bridge with ministers and military generals.

At its widest, the bridge has six traffic lanes in each direction and measures 67.3 meters (222 feet) across. A regional director for the Guinness Book of World Records present at the opening said that makes it the world’s widest suspension bridge.

Around one million cubic meters of concrete as well as 1,400 km (2,268 miles) of steel wire for 160 suspension cables were used in its construction, according to a presentation given at the formal opening.

The bridge crosses the Nile’s Warraq Island, which has an estimated 100,000 residents, some of whom have protested against planned demolitions on the island and plans to develop it into a “modern residential community”.

Other prestige projects launched under Sisi include an expansion of the Suez Canal, completed in 2015, and the building of a new capital in the desert east of Cairo that is currently under construction.

Egypt FM in Ethiopia to End Standoff in Talks on Nile Dam

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SAUDI NEWS AGENCY ASHARQ AL-AWSAT)

 

Egypt FM in Ethiopia to End Standoff in Talks on Nile Dam

Tuesday, 26 December, 2017 – 12:15
Egypt’s Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry. (Reuters)
Cairo – Asharq Al-Awsat

Egypt’s Minister of Foreign Affairs Sameh Shoukry is scheduled to head to the Ethiopian capital Addis Ababa on Tuesday to resume the negotiations with his counterpart Workneh Gebeyehu regarding the Renaissance Dam project on the Nile River.

The talks aim at breaking over the dam, which Addis Ababa is building on one of the main tributaries of the Nile.

Cairo said the dam would threaten water supplies that have fed Egypt’s agriculture and economy for thousands of years.

Ethiopia, for its part, said the dam, which it hopes will help make it Africa’s largest power exporter, will have no major effect on Egypt.

It accuses Cairo of flexing its political muscle to deter financiers from backing other Ethiopian power projects.

Egyptian officials said safeguarding the country’s quota of Nile water is a matter of national security.

“No one can touch Egypt’s water … (which) means life or death for a population,” President Abdul Fattah al-Sisi said last month.

Egypt’s Foreign Ministry’s spokesman Ahmed Abou Zeid affirmed in a statement that this move comes in light of the Egyptian desire to end the standoff in talks on the dam’s specialized technical committee work.

Abou Zeid also said that Shoukry’s visit aims to express Egypt’s good intentions regarding cooperating and rebuilding confidence with Ethiopia to preserve both countries’ rights to Nile water.

Delegations from Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia met in Cairo in November to approve a study by a French firm commissioned to assess the dam’s environmental and economic impact.

However, negotiations stalled when they failed to agree on the initial report with each blaming others for blocking progress.

Shoukry is willing to bring new ideas and proposals to light to help the technical committee in its work, according to the statement.

The negotiations will also include discussing the details of Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn’s visit to Egypt next January.