5 Cities With the Largest Subway Systems

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

5 Cities With the Largest Subway Systems

A great subway system is a badge of honor for a city. As writers at City Metric, a website devoted to exploring topics that affect the lives of city-dwellers, discovered, there are lots of ways to measure such a system. Maybe it’s by how many people ride a specific subway in a day or year, or maybe it’s by how many stations there are around a city.

For the purposes of this article, we looked at subways with the longest routes. Here are the top five largest subway systems in the world.

Seoul, South Korea

Seoul, South Korea

Credit: Savvapanf Photo/Shutterstock.com

332 km/206 miles

More than two billion people ride the particularly high-tech subway system in Seoul each year. It’s known for its tech, including screens displaying important messages and internet access on its cars. The first line was built in the 1970’s, and today the system includes 22 lines that are still being expanded. Plus, it’s relatively cheap and known for its cleanliness, and all directional signs are written in three languages, including English.

New York City, New York, U.S.A.

New York City, New York, U.S.A.

Credit: William Perugini/Shutterstock.com

373 km/232 miles

The much older New York City subway system opened in 1904. Nearly six million people utilize the transit system every day, at about 470 stations — more than any other system in the world. Most of those stations operate 24 hours a day.

London, England

London, England

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402 km/250 miles

The London Underground, sometimes called the Tube, opened in the 1860’s. Despite the name, most of the lines were built just below the surface with the “cut and cover” method, and many of the newer tracks are above ground. The system includes 11 lines and about 200 stations, and carries about five million daily passengers today.

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Beijing, China

Beijing, China

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527 km/327 miles

With almost 11 million daily riders, this is the world’s busiest subway system. It first opened in 1969 and had only two lines for decades, before undergoing a rapid expansion in 2002. And those 11 million daily riders are expected to expand to 18 million by 2021. By then, the subway will account for 60 percent of the city’s public transit ridership.

Shanghai, China

Shanghai, China

Credit: Arwin Adityavarna/iStock

548 km/341 miles

The largest subway system in the world by route length is still expanding, with plans to add seven new lines by 2025. It’s a system that links provinces and provides inter-city transportation — or at least, it will soon. On a regular day, 10 million people use the system. The most recent expansions to the system opened in December.

5 U.S. Cities With the Worst Traffic

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

5 U.S. Cities With the Worst Traffic

Each year, INRIX, a transportation data firm, releases a report that lists the U.S. cities with the worst traffic. Recently, they released a new traffic congestion report. The study ranked cities based on delays caused by congestion on U.S. roads and expressways. It also adjusted the measurement according to each city’s population. INRIX determined the per capita and cost of congestion for each U.S. city as well. The result was a list of the worst cities in which to commute back and forth to work. Read on and discover if your city made the list.

Los Angeles

Credit: franckreporter/iStock

The City of Angels, Los Angeles came in at number five for the worst traffic. Known for its gorgeous weather, celebrities and thrilling night life, Los Angeles also boasts bumper-to-bumper traffic. According to Forbes, if you live in Los Angeles, you can expect to spend 128 hours sitting in mind-numbing traffic every year.

New York City

Credit: B&M Noskowski/iStock

New York City comes in fourth. Yes, it’s one of the greatest cities in the world. And, yes, you can never be bored in New York City. After all, you have theater, dance, art, museums, amazing restaurants and nightclubs all at your fingertips. But that doesn’t change the fact that you can pretty much count on sitting in some horrendous traffic if you don’t take the subway. In fact, if you drive in New York City, you’ll end up trapped in traffic jams for 133 hours each year. If you can make it in New York City, you can make it anywhere. But if you live somewhere else, you just might avoid sitting in all that traffic.

Chicago

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Chi-Town. The Windy City. Those are two nicknames for Chicago, the city famous for Oprah, the Chicago Bulls and some seriously good hot dogs. But those aren’t the only things that put Chicago on the map. By the end of the year, Chicagoans have lived 138 hours of their lives sitting in traffic jams. That’s an annual total of $1,920 personal dollars lost.

Washington, D.C.

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Washington, D.C. is steeped in history. No visit is complete without taking a tour of the White House, visiting the Lincoln Memorial or checking out the Smithsonian Museum. But if you plan to drive around town, be prepared to sit in traffic. By the end of the year, D.C. commuters will waste a whopping 155 hours just sitting in their cars waiting for traffic to inch along. The money each commuter loses equals $2,161 annually.

Boston

Credit: f11photo/Shutterstock

Sorry, Boston. INRIX’s study concluded that Boston has the worst commute times in the U.S. Sure, Boston is a really cool city, a town our forefathers once called home. And it’s the home of the world-famous marathon as well as Fenway Park. Boston also has the worst traffic in the country. During peak commute times, unfortunate travelers can plan on sitting in traffic for 164 hours each year. That’s just like each Boston commuter losing $2,291 annually.

The Busiest Intersections in the World

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

The Busiest Intersections in the World

What’s more fun than crossing the street? Crossing the street with thousands of your closest friends, of course! Throughout the world, there are certain notorious intersections that raise the simple act of crossing the street to the level of competitive sport. Crowded, noisy, and full of visual stimulation, these congested spots offer thoroughly urban experiences that will undoubtedly leave a lasting impression.

From the bustling streets of Tokyo to the constant hustle of Times Square in New York and several spots in between, here are four of the busiest intersections in the world.

Shibuya Crossing, Tokyo

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If you Google “busiest intersection in the world,” you’ll find pages and pages of text dedicated to this notorious crossing — and it’s not just hype. Located outside of the Shibuya subway station in Tokyo, some reports state that 1 million pedestrians traverse this intersection… per day.

But perhaps the most fascinating thing is how the crossing unfolds. All of the traffic lights turn red at the same time in all directions, signaling to pedestrians that it’s go time. Pedestrians — as many as 2,500 per crossing cycle — jostle into the intersection from all directions in what has lovingly been dubbed “the scramble.”

Curious? Insiders say that one of the best viewing points is the second story window of the Shibuya Crossing Starbucks, which also happens to be one of the coffee giant’s busiest outlets in the world.

Times Square, New York City

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If New York is the City that Never Sleeps, then Times Square is the endless jolt of espresso that keeps it wired. Originally known as Longacre Square, it was re-dubbed Times Square after “The New York Times” moved its headquarters to the bow-tie-shaped crossing, which is not actually a square at all.

Festooned with blaring advertisements and lighted signs from all angles, this is certainly a well-trafficked crossing. According to the Times Square automated counting system (18 cameras located on six different buildings, monitoring 35 unique locations in the area), there can be between 380,000 and 450,000 pedestrians in the heart of the square each day.

On New Year’s Eve, with the famous ball dropping ceremony, the traffic surges to a million or more.

Place Charles de Gaulle, Paris

Credit: Orbon Alija / iStock

This massive junction was originally named Place de l’Étoile, or “Star Plaza” or “Square of the Star.”

That name makes sense when you view the intersection on a map — a staggering 12 avenues that all converge to meet in a starburst formation. And at the center, its pinnacle is the famed Arc de Triomphe.

With 12 avenues meeting in one place and automobiles, scooters, and trucks whizzing by, you’d be a fool to try to dash across this intersection. Happily, the city has made it easy, offering underground pedestrian access to the square.

Piccadilly Circus, London

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Sorry, but you won’t find elephants or a trapeze here. In the context of this interchange, “circus” refers to the circular shape of the intersection rather than the presence of a big top.

Nevertheless, London’s Piccadilly Circus is quite a spectacle to behold. In fact, this intersection, which sees as many as 100 million tourists per year, is so busy that the term “Piccadilly Circus” is used in the vernacular to refer to any number of convoluted or crowded settings.

Located in close proximity to the theater district, several major shopping streets, and the London Underground, there’s plenty to see and do in this bustling area. If you’re sensitive to bright lights, bring shades: The brightly lighted signs are turned off only for special occasions or for maintenance work.

The Most Congested Urban Intersections

Credit: _curly_ / iStockPhoto

Did you look both ways? Crossing the street is far from an average experience at these internationally infamous crossings. Once you’ve visited these busy intersections, you may never look at a walk sign the same way!

Baltimore: Trump tweets ‘no human being would want to live there’

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)
(ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I FIND HYPOCRITICAL ABOUT OUR COWARD IN CHIEF IS WHEN HE TALKS TRASH ABOUT BALTIMORE IS THE VERY WELL KNOWN FACT THAT FOR MANY DECADES NOW THE CITY OF NEW YORK THAT HE SEEMS TO LOVE SO MUCH HAS MANY MORE RATS THAN IT DOES HUMAN BEINGS. THIS IS WITHOUT TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE TWO LEGGED RAT PACK ALSO KNOWN AS THE TRUMP FAMILY TREE WHICH IS ROTTED THROUGH ITS ROOTS.)oped: oldpoet56)

 

Baltimore stands up for its city after Trump tweets ‘no human being would want to live there’

(CNN)Baltimore did not take President Donald Trump’s recent attack of the city lying down. Instead, Charm City was quick to stand up and fight back.

Trump lashed out at another prominent African American lawmaker on Saturday, tweeting that his Baltimore district is a “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess.”
The President’s tirade was directed at House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings, who represents Maryland’s 7th Congressional District in the House and recently lambasted conditions at the border. Trump’s attack against Cummings was the latest verbal assault against a minority member of Congress who is a frequent critic of the President.
The President suggested that conditions in Cummings’ district, which is majority black and includes parts of Baltimore, are “FAR WORSE and more dangerous” than those at the US-Mexico border and called it a “very dangerous & filthy place.”
Cummings, the city’s leaders and residents were quick to defend Baltimore. The Twitter hashtag #wearebaltimore was trending Saturday night, with users posting pictures and comments expressing their pride in the city.
“Mr. President, I go home to my district daily,” Cummings wrote on Twitter Saturday in response. “Each morning, I wake up, and I go and fight for my neighbors. It is my constitutional duty to conduct oversight of the Executive Branch. But, it is my moral duty to fight for my constituents.”
Baltimore’s Mayor Jack Young also took the attack to heart, criticizing Trump for disparaging a “vibrant American City.”
“It’s completely unacceptable for the political leader of our country to denigrate a vibrant American City like Baltimore, and to viciously attack U.S. Representative Elijah Cummings a patriot and a hero,” Young tweeted.
The Baltimore Sun’s editorial board published a response, highlighting aspects of the city they felt the president left out: the beauty of Inner Harbor, the history of Fort McHenry, the prominence of Johns Hopkins Hospital, and the national dependency on the Social Security Administration, which is housed in the city.
“And it surely wasn’t about the economic standing of a district where the median income is actually above the national average,” the board wrote.
“Better to have some vermin living in your neighborhood than to be one.”
Other Democrats came to Baltimore’s defense on Saturday, including California Sen. Kamala Harris, whose national 2020 presidential campaign headquarters is located there.
“Baltimore has become home to my team and it’s disgraceful the president has chosen to start his morning disparaging this great American city,” Harris wrote on Twitter.

‘City of good Americans’

Others called out the city’s character: “There’s a block party today on my southside street. This is a city of good Americans who deserve more than a grifting, hollow and self-absorbed failure of a man as their president,” tweeted author David Simon.
And while they defended their city, some had criticisms for Trump.
“It should be beneath the dignity of the President of the United States, the person who is supposed to be the leader of the free world, to disparage and personally attack a great American city and another great American leader,” Baltimore City Council President Brandon Scott told reporters Saturday. “Instead of up upholding his oath of office to put the greater good of all American citizens, no matter where they live and who they voted for above all else, that he decided to do the opposite.”
Many of the elected officials who spoke out praised Cummings, who grew up in Baltimore, for his help in the recent developments the district has undertaken, though they acknowledge there is still more work to do.
“We stand ready and willing to work with the President, if he is willing to go beyond tweets, to help us solve some of the problems that are deep enrooting in Baltimore’s history,” Scott said.

10 Cities All Architecture Lovers Need to Visit Before They Die

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

Cities All Architecture Lovers Need to Visit Before They Die

From towering skyscrapers to the ancient Colosseum, the world is filled with architectural marvels. And since architecture is best enjoyed in person, here are 10 cities that architecture lovers simply must visit.

Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

Chicago, Illinois, U.S.A.

Credit: Semmick Photo/Shutterstock

It’s called the “City of Big Shoulders” for a reason. Chicago is home to some of the oldest skyscrapers, such as the Manhattan Building, built in 1891; the Reliance Building, built in 1895; and Chicago Savings Bank Building, completed in 1905. Most of Downtown Chicago was destroyed in the Chicago Fire of 1871, but the iconic Chicago Water Tower, built in 1869, was left standing. Built solely of yellow Lemont limestone, seeing the 182-foot tower firsthand should be on every architecture lovers bucket list.

Rome, Italy

Rome, Italy

Credit: S.Borisov/Shutterstock

Rome is home to some of the world’s most photographed structures, including the Colosseum, the Roman Forum and Trajan’s Market. Had it not been for the Romans, designs like the arch and the dome would never have come to be. Rome’s classical structures are a must see. That’s a given. But the city’s Baroque style buildings, which were mostly constructed during the 17th century, are also well worth your time. The sheer grandness of structures like St. Peter’s Basilicaand the Trevi Fountain can’t be captured in a photograph. Few things in life will leave you as awestruck as taking a stroll inside St. Peter’s, with its massive dome, and looking up. You may never want to look down again.

Barcelona, Spain

Barcelona, Spain

Credit: V_E/Shutterstock

Influenced by the legendary 19th century Catalan architect Antoni Gaudi, Barcelona’s architecture, much like the city itself, is imaginative and colorful. One sight that’s a must see is Gaudi’s Casa Batllo. The façade of the building is constructed of broken ceramic tiles, thus creating an eye-popping mosaic that is unlike anything you’ve ever seen. Other structures that are inspired by Gaudi’s vivid imagination include Jean Nouvel’s Tower, which is designed to resemble a geyser of water shooting through the air, and Frank Gehry’s Fish.

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Dubai, United Arab Emirates

Credit: Rastislav Sedlak SK/Shutterstock

In addition to being home to the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa, the Dubai skyline is filled with twisty-turny steel buildings. If you find yourself wandering in this desert city, be sure to check out the Burj al Arab, which is designed to look like an Arabian dhow ship, as well as the curving Cayan, with its seemingly impossible 90-degree twist. There’s also the famed underwater zoo located in the Dubai Mall, which features 300 different species of aquatic life, including all types of fish, sting rays and sharks.

Shanghai, China

Shanghai, China

Credit: Sven Hansche/Shutterstock

Fueled by government investment, Shanghai has grown rapidly in recent years. It’s almost as if a glossy new structure pops up each month. The architecture in Shanghai is modernistic, and best represented in buildings like the Hongkou Soho office building, with its pleated exterior. Shanghai is also home to the second tallest building in the world, the Shanghai Tower, which features a twisted, glass façade that stretches upward for 2,073 feet.

Paris, France

Paris, France

Credit: Catarina Belova/Shutterstock

The birthplace of Art Deco and Gothic architecture, Paris is a city whose rich architectural history stretches back centuries. Gothic style, which is marked by colorful stained glass windows and flying buttresses, can be seen in a number of Paris cathedrals, including the Sainte-Chapelle, the St-Gervais-et-St-Protais and, most famously, Notre-Dame, which was in the news earlier this year after sustaining serious damage during a 15-hour fire. Paris’s famed Art Deco buildings, with their notable exteriors that feature numerous horizontal lines, began popping up shortly before World War I and were dominant in the ’20s and ’30s. Théâtre des Champs-Élysées and the Grand Rex movie palace are two prominent structures that exhibit this style. This is a small sample of the numerous architectural wonders in the City of Light.

Moscow, Russia

Moscow, Russia

Credit: Reidl/Shutterstock

The Russian capital is home to some of the most recognizable architecture in the world with a style known simply as Russian architecture. Arguably the most renown structure in the Russian style is Moscow’s Saint Basil’s Cathedral. Constructed in the 16th century during the reign of Ivan the Terrible, the cathedral is known for its vibrant, onion-shaped domes. Moscow is also home to more recent architectural wonders like the Ostankino Tower, which was completed in 1967 and was for a period of time the tallest building in the world, and a group of Moscow skyscrapers known as the Seven Sisters. The seven buildings, which were built during the reign of Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, are wide and blocky, and scattered throughout Moscow. They were constructed in the Stalinist style of Russian architecture, which borrows elements of the Russian baroque.

Athens, Greece

Athens, Greece

Credit: milosk50/Shutterstock

Several ancient monuments from Athens’s classical era are still standing, most notably the Parthenon, with its enormous stone columns. There is also the Theatre of Dionysus, which was the birthplace of Greek tragedy and the first theater ever constructed. And what would a historically rich city like Athens be without its ancient temples? During its heyday, the Temple of Olympian Zeus, which was completed around the 2nd century, had an unthinkable 104 columns, although only a few remain standing today.

Istanbul, Turkey

Istanbul, Turkey

Credit: LALS STOCK/Shutterstock

The most populous city in Turkey is known for two distinct styles of architecture: Byzantine and Ottoman. The Hagia Sophia, which was constructed in the 6th century, is a church that is emblematic of the Byzantine style, with its massive dome and elegiac mosaics depicting Christ and other biblical figures. The Ottoman style of architecture also flourished in Istanbul. Throughout the 16th and 17th centuries a number of imperial mosques were constructed throughout the city, including Faith Mosque, Yeni Mosque\ and Bayezid Mosque. The mosques all have the key features of the Ottoman style, with extensive use of domes and columns, and are an absolute marvel to experience in person.

New York City, New York, U.S.A.

New York City, New York, U.S.A.

Credit: GagliardiPhotography/Shutterstock

From the Art Deco masterpiece that is the Chrysler Building (1930), to the Gothic Revival design of the Woolworth Building (1913), to the more recent green design of the Conde Nast Building, New York City’s skyscrapers employ a wide range of stylistic elements. The character of the city can also be seen in the architectural designs used in its residential neighborhoods. From the brownstones in Brooklyn to the tenements on the Lower East Side, New York’s five boroughs are an architectural cornucopia whose styles are as diverse as the city itself.

5 Colonial-Era U.S. Landmarks That Are Still Standing

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

5 Colonial-Era U.S. Landmarks That Are Still Standing

How much do you remember about colonial-era America? For many of us, it’s been a while since we studied U.S. history, and specifically the American Revolution. If you live outside of the original 13 colonies, you might not be exposed to constant reminders like historic landmarks that serve as living memories of this volatile time. But if you’re thinking of creating a historic road trip through the original states this summer, you’re going to want to include these five landmarks on your list.

Fraunces Tavern – New York City

Credit: OlegAlbinsky / iStock

New York City is full of locations where our Founding Fathers met, the nation’s first president was sworn into office, and which was an occupied territory under British rule. If your travels take you to lower Manhattan, you can see all of those places and get a history lesson at Fraunces Tavern. Fraunces Tavern is a real working pub that was originally intended to be the private home of the De Lancey family after the land was first acquired in 1719.

Eventually, the three-story building was transferred to Samuel Fraunces in 1762 and was named Sign of Queen Charlotte (The Queen’s Tavern). The property served as an inn for weary travelers, a place for hungry locals, and—at times—a safe haven for loyalists during the Revolution. As the war progressed, patronage shifted to Continentals and even housed George Washington when he was in the city. Since 1762, Fraunces Tavern has served as a bar and occasional boarding house. Today, you can visit the museum on the upper floors and enjoy a drink downstairs in the bar or grab a bite in one of the historically named rooms.

Old Tennent Presbyterian Church – Manalapan, New Jersey

Credit: imagesbybobbysax / Instagram

Everyone knows that historic battles occurred in fields all across the original colonies. But did you know that one church in a sleepy New Jersey town served as a field hospital after the Battle of Monmouth? In June 1778, the British and Continental armies faced off in a part of Monmouth county known today as Freehold. While the battle wasn’t a deciding point militarily, a historic landmark was made when the Old Tennent Presbyterian Church in present Manalapan became a triage center for the Continental Army.

Army doctors cared for wounded soldiers while the battle raged on around them. And to this day, you can find bullet holes and cannonballs in the church’s walls as well as see marks and blood stains on several church pews where wounded soldiers were treated.

Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson – Winnabow, North Carolina

Credit: BTFA1726 / Wikimedia

Often when we focus on the Colonial Era in the U.S., we think about the Northeast almost exclusively. But the southern colonies were just as active throughout this period of history. Brunswick Town is a port town on Cape Fear River in North Carolina that was once central during the 18th and 19th centuries for sea merchants and businessmen who relied on exporting their goods. The settlement was established in 1729 and helped to drive economic growth in the region thanks to an infusion of wealthy landowners from South Carolina.

But the town is best known as an early site of Colonial rebellion during the Stamp Act of 1765—a law that required any legal documents or commercial publications to feature a stamp that had to be purchased from the Crown. Angry citizens formed an armed mob and prevented a British ship from unloading the stamps. While this temporarily halted trade in the region, the colonists’ persistent protest in Brunswick Town led to the eventual repeal of the Stamp Act.

Nathan Hale Homestead – Coventry, Connecticut

Credit: KenWiedermann / iStock

Who is Nathan Hale? If you’re not an American Revolution buff or a Connecticut resident, you might not know. But for the Constitution State, this young man is a local hero who was born in Coventry. Nathan Hale is considered by many to be an integral member of the Continental spy ring that provided vital information about British activities to the Continental Army and General George Washington specifically. However, the spy ring wasn’t well managed, and Hale wasn’t the best spy.

After infiltrating New York City and gathering critical information in 1776, he was discovered by British forces with drawings and detailed notes—outing him as a spy and condemning him to death. Nathan Hale is best known for his famous final words, “I only regret that I have but one life to lose for my country.” But these days you can visit the Nathan Hale Homestead, which has been expertly preserved from its humble origins when it was built in 1776.

George Washington’s Estate – Mount Vernon, Virginia

Credit: JacobH / iStock

And finally, if you’re going to create a trip focused on U.S. colonial history, you simply can’t skip Mount Vernon. This Virginia locale is the home of our nation’s first president, George Washington. Step back in time and see how Washington lived as you walk through the plantation’s palatial grounds. Mount Vernon serves as an immersive experience with guided tours and history lessons that help you understand more about the man who would lead a cluster of colonies to independence and what led him into this role. The estate was listed as a National Historic Landmark in 1960.

Puerto Rico Governor Under Increased Pressure To Resign

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NBC NEWS)

 

By Nicole Acevedo

Puerto Rico Gov. Ricardo Rosselló doubled down on his plans to stay in his job after protests calling for his resignation turned violent Monday night. The massive protests injured about two dozen police officers and roughly five protesters were arrested as a result of the demonstration, according to authorities.

During a press conference Tuesday afternoon, the embattled governor said, “I was elected by the people,” citing this as one of his main reasons for not resigning.

The remarks and the protests come in the wake of multiple scandals that have hit the Rosselló administration during recent weeks regarding corruption investigations and the leaking of private chats between the governor and some officials and close associates.

At least 889 pages of the private chats, which included profanity-laced, misogynistic and homophobic comments were released Saturday by Puerto Rico’s top investigative journalism media outlet after excerpts were first reported days before.

In the chats on the encrypted messaging app Telegram, Rosselló made fun of an obese man he posed with in a photo, called former New York City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito a “whore” and said Carmen Yulín Cruz, the mayor of San Juan who had announced her intent to run for governor against Rosselló in 2020, was “off her meds.”

“Either that, or she’s a tremendous HP,” the governor said, using the Spanish initials for “son/daughter of a b—-.”

The members of the chat group were Luis Rivera Marín, Rosselló’s secretary of state; Christian Sobrino, who held a series of important economic posts; Carlos Bermúdez, a one-time communications aide; Edwin Miranda, a communications consultant; Interior Secretary Ricardo Llerandi; Public Affairs Secretary Anthony Maceira, and Elías Sánchez, one-time representative to the board overseeing Puerto Rico’s bankruptcy.

Image:
Citizens protest near the executive mansion demanding the resignation of Gov. Ricardo Rossello, in San Juan, Puerto Rico on July 15, 2019.Carlos Giusti / AP

The chat also contains vulgar references to Puerto Rican star Ricky Martin’s homosexuality and a series of emojis of a raised middle finger directed at a federal control board overseeing the island’s finances.

Talking about a lack of forensic pathologists as the death toll rose after Hurricane Maria, Sobrino said, “Can’t we feed a body to the crows?”

The scandal has sunk Rosselló into the deepest crisis of his career.

The messages were leaked shortly after Puerto Rico’s former secretary of education, former Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration head Ángela Ávila-Marrero and four other people with government contracts under Rosselló’s administration were arrested last week and are facing 32 counts of money laundering, fraud and other related charges for the alleged embezzlement of $15.5 million in federal funding between 2017 and 2019.

The White House reacted to the unrest in Puerto Rico on Tuesday afternoon saying, “The unfortunate events of the past week in Puerto Rico prove the President’s concerns about the mismanagement, politicization, and corruption have been valid.”

“We remain committed to Puerto Rico’s recovery and steadfast in protecting taxpayers and the Puerto Rico survivors from political corruption and financial abuse,” the statement said.

In reaction to comments from the White House, Rosselló said that “corruption is a social evil” and it “has occurred in all administrations.”

The U.S. Secretary of State, Mike Pompeo, is expected to make a stop in San Juan on Thursday, as part of an official trip that will take him to Argentina, Ecuador, Mexico and El Salvador.

The scandal comes as the U.S.Senate is prepared to add more restrictions that could limit federal funds for the island, including $12 billion in Medicaid appropriations for the next four years and other hurricane-recovery aid.

Puerto Rico is still recovering from the category 4 hurricane that destroyed the island’s long-neglected infrastructure and power grid and resulted in the deaths of at least 2,975 people, making it the deadliest U.S.-based natural disaster in 100 years and has come to define a sad turning point in the island’s history.

For many Puerto Ricans still recovering from Hurricane Maria and on the back of the island’s biggest public financial collapse, the scandal analysts and ordinary people are calling “Chatgate” or “Rickyleaks” has resulted in unprecedented protests against the U.S. commonwealth’s chief executive.

Growing protests

As thousands marched in the capital Monday calling for Rosselló’s resignation, police tried to disperse them with pepper spray in front of the Fortaleza governor’s residence, which was protected by barricades.

Puerto Rico police spokesperson Axel Valencia told Telemundoduring live coverage of the demonstrations that such protests are one of the biggest, most intense he’d seen in the island in recent history — leaving about 40 properties in Old San Juan, where protests took place, damaged.

The U.S. Attorney’s Office, the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, Homeland Security Investigations, and the Drug Enforcement Administration are investigating the violent acts and vandalism that took place Monday.

Protesters have been calling for Rosselló’s resignation for over three consecutive days. Demonstrations first started with hundreds of people, then growing to the thousands. The growth was reflected on Twitter as the hashtag #RickyRenuncia (Resign Ricky, a shortened version of his name, Ricardo) was trending worldwide Monday.

Some leaders of the U.S. territory’s Legislature said they weren’t planning impeachment proceedings. Others introduced a resolution to initiate a process of impeachment for Rosselló. In it, House Rep. Dennis Márquez outlined 18 possible crimes that stem from the leaked chats.

At the same time, an influential association of mayors from Rosselló’s pro-statehood party said he had lost their support.

The president of the commonwealth’s House of Representatives, Carlos Méndez Núñez, said Sunday night that legislators from Rosselló’s pro-statehood New Progressive Party, which has a majority in both houses, did not support starting impeachment proceedings against the governor. He said they gave Rosselló a one-week deadline to reflect, show contrition and prove he could continue to govern.

“Impeachment isn’t on the table yet,” he said. “But we reserve the right to evaluate if that’s merited.”

Puerto Rican artists Benito A. Martínez Ocasio, known as Bad Bunny, and René Pérez, known as Residente, both said on social media they planned to return to Puerto Rico to protest Rosselló’s administration on Wednesday.

Playwright Lin-Manuel Miranda, whose production of “Hamilton” on the island is mentioned in the chats, called them “a very disturbing portrait of how this Administration operates.

Even if Rosselló survives until next year’s election, it’s clear to many observers that he has been profoundly weakened and less able to deal with crises.

Despite widespread cynicism in Puerto Rico about politicians’ corruption and self-dealing, the chat shocked residents in a way that other scandals haven’t, particularly given Rosselló’s image as a gentle, even meek family man, said Mario Negrón Portillo, a professor at the University of Puerto Rico’s school of public administration.

“Everyone woke up one day and the governor was spouting vulgarities,” Negrón said. “There’s nothing worse for a politician than losing legitimacy. I think Ricardo Rosselló has lost legitimacy.”

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Associated Press contributed.

7 Most Visited Attractions in New York City

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

7 Most Visited Attractions in New York City

Call it befitting that The City That Never Sleeps lives in the dreams of citizens of the world. Home of the National Stock Exchange, high fashion, fine art, exquisite cuisine, and skyscrapers reaching high as the American Dream, New York consistently brings in millions of visitors from all over the globe. The most densely populated U.S. city has an endless list of attractions to explore on any given day, but a handful stand out with numbers as large as the city itself.

Times Square

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From New Year’s to the stock exchange, entertainment to dining, Times Square endures as an iconic center of thriving metropolitan life. With over 39 million visitors annually, “the center of the universe” is the most visited tourist site in the world. The staggering number of visitors to the square prompted the city to make adjustments to address the hectic streets when it established designated areas for performers, seating, and exit routes.

Brooklyn Bridge

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In spite of countless private sales, the Brooklyn Bridge remains the property of the city. The nearly 6,000-foot bridge connecting Brooklyn to Manhattan sees over 120,000 vehicles, 4,000 pedestrians, and 2,600 bicyclists daily. By choice or by necessity, the Brooklyn Bridge is one of New York’s busiest hot spots, offering an idyllic view of the harbor for misty-eyed tourists and disgruntled commuters alike.

Grand Central Terminal

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Driving through New York has never been for the faint of heart, making its public transit system a staple of many New Yorkers’ daily lives. Grand Central Terminal has been coined the “world’s loveliest station” with its opal glass clock, astronomical decorations, and fine dining. The beauty of its corridors attracts tourists and natives to breathe in the air of constant movement.

The 9/11 Memorial

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On September 11, 2001, the world shook in the face of horror and tragedy. From the ashes of the World Trade Center, America summoned its strength to erect a monument in honor of the loss of innocent lives and the courage of the first responders who gave theirs in turn at a moment’s notice. Ten million visitors have graced the grounds of the memorial since its opening in 2014.

The Empire State Building

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“Twas beauty that killed the beast,” but the tourists come for the view. At a height of 1,454 feet, the Empire State Building Observatory towers 102 stories above the heart of Manhattan with its breathtaking view of the New York City skyline. The National Historic Landmark continues to draw crowds, nearly competing with its own enormity. Over 110 million have visited the monument to date, with yearly totals around 3 million.

The Statue of Liberty

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Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to snap the perfect photo op for their Instagram account. Our green lady from France is still an internationally renowned landmark of the United States. Countless tourists from around the world and locals seeking a reminder of American history flock to the Statue of Liberty every year. In 2018, the Statue of Liberty saw 4.34 million recreational visitors.

The Metropolitan Art Museum

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The image of New York is one of busy city streets, larger-than-life ambitions, and world-class art. It’s this last point that has been drawing the biggest crowds of any single attraction in the city. 2018 saw a record high for the Metropolitan Art Museum with 7.35 million visitors. This last year, the Met housed an exhibit of over 200 installations of Michelangelo’s work titled “Michelangelo: Divine Draftsman and Designer.”

5 U.S. Cities with Multiple Airports

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

5 U.S. Cities with Multiple Airports (and Which Are the Best to Fly Into)

If you’ve ever planned a trip to a major city, you know that often there’s more than one airport you can choose (or if you’re going to somewhere remote, there might not even be any to choose from). And while this means you have more options, it can make planning your flight more difficult. Which airport should you pick? In truth, there’s no easy answer as it’s going to depend on your route, budget, and ability to access an airport. So check out this guide for five cities served by multiple airports.

New York City

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Airports: EWR, HPN, ISP, JFK, LGA

Of course, the city that never sleeps is first. There are only two airports that are within New York City limits. But three airports are directly associated with the Big Apple, and the remaining two are known only to locals as a smart alternative—depending on your travel routes. Of the three major airports, John F. Kennedy International (JFK) and LaGuardia International (LGA) are based in the extreme outskirts of Queens while Newark Liberty International (EWR) is located in New Jersey, 30 minutes outside of the city. But Westchester County Airport (HPN) and Long Island MacArthur Airport (ISP) are two popular regional alternatives that also provide domestic service for select airlines—if you can figure out how to get there.

JFK and EWR are the easiest to reach via mass transit thanks to their air trains that connect directly to the NYC MTA Subway and New Jersey Transit trains that terminate at New York Pennsylvania Station respectively. If you don’t mind buses, the NYC MTA M60 bus will drop you off at LGA. But flight delays and long waits on the tarmac for your flight to take off might make you rethink this airport. To make it easy on yourself, select “NYC” as the airport code to get as many options as possible in your search results.

Chicago

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Airports: MDW, ORD

Chicago is serviced by two primary airports, Chicago Midway International (MDW) and O’Hare International (ORD). Of the two, O’Hare is far larger and manages more traffic—serving as a popular layover option for numerous domestic airlines like American and United. Typically, O’Hare is preferred for international flights while Midway is best known as a more convenient option for domestic flights thanks to shorter security lines.

Like many major cities, you can rely on mass transit to get to and from O’Hare. Both airports offer direct access to CTA rail lines for 24-hour service to Chicago and surrounding suburbs. If your trip is for farther beyond the Chicago city limits, the Metra is the commuter rail option for you from O’Hare.

Miami

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Airports: FLL, MIA, PBI

Bienvenido a Miami! If your travels are taking you to one of the sexiest cities in the U.S., you have three airport options: Miami International (MIA), Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International (FLL), and West Palm Beach International (PBI). Unlike a lot of other cities, Miami’s busiest airport (MIA) is a short drive from the heart of the city. Within less than 20 minutes you can be on South Beach sunning yourself and enjoying the weather.

MIA is the nation’s third busiest airport, which means that while you’ll have the greatest number of flight options, you can also experience delays both on the runway and at the security checkpoint. FLL and PBI offer a more laid-back experience but fewer flight options depending on your airline. However, PBI is the only airport that’s accessible by train—the Tri-Rail system. All other airports must be accessed by taxi or rideshare service.

San Francisco

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Airports: OAK, SFO, SJC

San Francisco is another popular destination for tourists and business travelers. Most people are aware of only their largest airport, San Francisco International (SFO). However, locals know that there are two alternate options, Oakland International (OAK) and Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International (SJC). While SFO offers the most flights and variety of carriers, it’s not uncommon to experience delays—especially through security. Still, direct access to the city via their transit train line, BART, makes SFO an attractive option.

But if you don’t like the crush of crowds, SJC and OAK can be prime alternatives. OAK is specifically ideal if you aren’t planning a standard trip to San Francisco. For travels through nearby cities or even Napa or Sonoma, OAK is perfect. But if you want to stay in San Francisco but just avoid the pain of SFO, SJC is a great alternative south of the city that’s also serviced by the Caltrain.

Los Angeles

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Airports: LAX, SNA, BUR, LGB, ONT

Finally, we round out this list with the city of angels. Los Angeles is a popular vacation and business destination that’s serviced by five airports. Los Angeles International (LAX) and Ontario International (ONT) are ideal for international travelers, with ONT offering less stress for immigration and from security lines.

If your plans don’t require international travel, skip the frustration of LAX and opt for the domestic-only airports: John Wayne (SNA), Bob Hope/Hollywood Burbank (BUR), or Long Beach (LGB). But be aware, LGB offers flights through only four carriers. Burbank (BUR) is the only L.A. area airport with direct rail access; all others can be accessed via taxi, rideshare or shuttle service. However, we’re fans of LAX because of the In-n-Out across the street where you can order their famed burgers off the secret menu, sit outside, and watch the planes land!

These U.S. states consume the most coffee

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

These U.S. states consume the most coffee

In 2018, Americans drank an average of 2 cups of coffee per day. The USDA forecasts 174.5 million bags of coffee will be produced in 2019 and lists the United States as the 2nd largest importer of coffee in the world. Across the country, we consume 25,835,000 bags of coffee.

We are a highly caffeinated nation.

We are merely doing our civil duty — after the Boston Tea Party, drinking coffee was a sign of patriotism. Since then, the popularity of coffee in the U.S. has only grown. The National Coffee Association’s annual report showed coffee drinking in America is at its highest levels with over 60% of all Americans consuming coffee every day.

Coffee in the Pacific Northwest

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It would be very difficult to discuss coffee in America without Seattle, Washington. Seattle might be the origin story for Starbucks, but Conde Naste doesn’t list it in their top 10 best Seattle coffee shops. Still, cities all over Washington are listed in the top 10 best cities in America for coffee lovers on many lists.

Here are some quick stats on Washington’s caffeine addiction:

Seattle, Washington:

  • 1 coffee shop per 2,308 residents
  • 278 coffee shops total

Everett, Washington:

  • 1 coffee shop per 2,752 residents
  • 40 coffee shops total

Vancouver, Washington:

  • 1 coffee shop per 2,224 residents
  • 78 coffee shops total

Travel & Leisure listed Portland, Oregon, the best coffee city due to its high number of coffee shops per capita. Portland also has the most coffee manufacturers per capita than anywhere else in the United States.

Coffee in New York City

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Frank Sinatra crooned he wanted “to wake up in the city that never sleeps.” With the most coffee shops per capita, the most donut shops per capita and the most affordable coffee shops per capita, New York fits the bill and is WalletHub’s #1 choice for “Best Coffee Cities in America.”

Coffee in California

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The west coast is a standout region for coffee drinkers. WalletHub found 4 of the top 5 cities for highest average coffee spend are in California: Fremont, Irvin, San Francisco and San Jose. California also holds 3 out of the 5 cities with the highest percentage of adult coffee drinkers as well: Anaheim, Los Angeles and Santa Ana.

Apartment Guide released a list of best cities for coffee lovers in America and Berkley was their top pick.

Coffee consumption in the Southeast

Nowhere in the southeastern corner of the U.S. makes any list of “cities with the most coffee shops” or “states with the highest coffee consumption.” The northeastern United States consumes the most coffee, according to Statista.

More coffee statistics

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  • If you love to grab coffee on the way to work, don’t move to Laredo, Corpus Christi and Garland, Texas. They have the fewest coffee shops per capita, alongside Hialeah, Florida, and San Bernardino, California.
  • Despite having so few coffee shops, Hialeah has the 3rd highest percentage of adult coffee drinkers.
  • Square analyzed data over the course of a year and found the latte is America’s most-ordered drink.
  • More than 60% of adults 18 and over consume coffee every day. And more than half of the coffee consumed is gourmet. Cold brew orders are up 42% over iced coffee.

With younger people driving the gourmet coffee market and 70% of coffee consumption happening at home, surely we can get a good Alexa-enabled coffee pot worth more than a hill of beans.

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