1 Person Killed as String of Tornadoes Leave Damage Across Louisiana and Mississippi

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WEATHER CHANNEL)

 

1 Person Killed as String of Tornadoes Leave Damage Across Louisiana and Mississippi

  • An extremely dangerous tornado barreled into northwest portions of Alexandria, Louisiana.
  • Damage was reported along a stretch of Highway 28 in Alexandria.
  • A tornado also caused damage in Edwards, Mississippi.
  • The sheriff says one person was killed in Vernon Parish, Louisiana.
  • People were reportedly trapped in homes northeast of DeRidder, Louisiana.

Tornado warnings exploded across parts of Louisiana and Mississippi on Monday afternoon, and reports of major damage began to emerge from both states.

As of Monday evening, the NOAA Storm Prediction Center had received 20 preliminary reports of tornadoes. Several of these were already confirmed by the National Weather Service.

A large and extremely dangerous tornado barreled into northwest portions of Alexandria, Louisiana, about 12:30 p.m. local time. The National Weather Service declared a tornado emergency for the area, which is home to about 47,000 people. A tornado emergency means there is a severe threat to human life and catastrophic damage is imminent or ongoing.

Severe damage was reported at Hope Baptist Church and School on Louisiana Highway 28 south of the airport in Alexandria, KALB reported. No one was injured.

A tornado destroyed the Hope Baptist Church and School building in Alexandria, Louisiana, on Monday, December 16, 2019. No one was injuried. (Brian Emfinger/Live Storms Media)
A tornado destroyed the Hope Baptist Church and School building in Alexandria, Louisiana, on Monday, December 16, 2019. No one was injuried.

(Brian Emfinger/Live Storms Media)

Highway 28 was closed from Stovall Road to the Walmart in Alexandria because of tornado damage, according to the Alexandria Police Department. No serious injuries had been reported, the department tweeted, but some buildings had heavy damage.

(MORE: Severe Thunderstorm Outbreak Forecast, Including the Potential For Strong Tornadoes, Through Tonight in the South)

West of Alexandria, damage was reported in Vernon Parish. The parish Sheriff’s Office said there were reports of downed trees and power lines in the area. Sheriff Sam Craft told The Weather Channel one person was killed in their home by the tornado.

A tree lies across a home east of Rosepine, Louisiana, on Monday, December 16, 2019, after a tornado blew through Vernon Parish. (Facebook/Vernon Parish Sheriff's Office)
A tree lies across a home east of Rosepine, Louisiana, on Monday, December 16, 2019, after a tornado blew through Vernon Parish.

(Facebook/Vernon Parish Sheriff’s Office)

Vernon Parish Chief Deputy Calvin Turner told The Associated Press, “We’ve got damage at lots of places. We’ve got a church where the fellowship hall is torn all to pieces. Some homes are hit. Right now we’re having trouble just getting to places because of tress that are down.”

In neighboring Beauregard Parish, people were trapped in homes northeast of DeRidder, Louisiana, Chief Detective Jared Morton of the Beauregard Sheriff’s Office told WAFB. He also said “major damage” was reported along the Beauregard/Vernon line and to businesses along U.S. Highway 171.

At least two homes were destroyed in Webster Parish, KTBS reported. Parish Sheriff Gary Sexton also said trees were blocking parts of at least three highways in the parish east of Shreveport, Louisiana. KTAL reported that mobile home was destroyed in the parish. The family that lived there was not at home when the storm hit.

Beauregard Parish Sheriff’s officials said they have received numerous reports of tornado damage in the eastern and northeastern portions of the parish, KIFY reported. Cars, structures and roads have all seen wind damage. No injuries have been reported.

More than 14,000 customers in Louisiana were without electricity as of 3 p.m. local time, according to poweroutage.us. Another 6,000 homes and businesses had no power in Mississippi.

In Mississippi, damage was reported from a tornado in Edwards, about 24 miles west of Jackson, Mississippi. The damage was near Mt. Moriah Road and Highway 467, WLBT reported. There were reports of trees falling on homes and across several roads.

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@MSEMA

Here’s a look at some of the damage caused by a possible tornado in the Hinds County town of Edwards. Photos courtesy of MEMA Drone Support.

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The National Weather Service said a tornado touched down shortly before noon in Newman, Mississippi, 12 miles east of Vicksburg.

About 2:45 p.m. a possible tornado touched down north of Liberty, Mississippi, in Amite County. The NWS said there were reports of injuries, damaged houses and people trapped in downed power lines.

Many schools in Mississippi and Alabama announced they would be closing early because of the weather. Mississippi State University in Starkville also announced it was closing at 2 p.m.

At around 5 p.m., a tornado was spotted and indicated on radar near Columbia in far south Mississippi. Another confirmed tornado from this storm struck near Laurel around 6:15 p.m.

In northern Mississippi a few miles from Tupelo, Guntown suffered storm damage, including significant damage to a church on the town’s northern side and an 18-wheeler blown off the road on Highway 45. It remains unclear whether this was caused by a tornado or straight-line winds.

A home was destroyed by a tornado in Sumrall, Mississippi, injuring at least seven people, according to the NWS.

A driver moves around a utility pole knocked down in Alexandria, La., Monday, Dec. 16, 2019, following a severe weather system went through the area. (AP Photo/Brad Kemp)
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A driver moves around a utility pole knocked down in Alexandria, La., Monday, Dec. 16, 2019, following a severe weather system went through the area. (AP Photo/Brad Kemp)
The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

6 States That Get the Least Snow

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

6 States That Get the Least Snow

If you love the sun and warmth, you are probably looking to avoid snow on your vacations at all costs. To secure the best odds of avoiding a chilly snowfall, consider planning a trip to one of the states below. These states receive the least amount of snow each year.

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Georgia

Georgia

Credit: Sean Pavone/ iStock

How much snow Georgia sees depends on what area you visit. Some locations in northern Georgia can see up to as much as three inches of snow each year. If avoiding snow is your goal, you are better off sticking to central and southern Georgia, where less than an inch of snow a year is the norm. The higher snow totals in northern Georgia are due to the Northeastern mountain region.

Mississippi

Mississippi

Credit: Sean Pavone/ Shutterstock

If avoiding snow is your goal, many areas of Mississippi are bound to deliver. The Gulf Coast and southern regions of Mississippi all see an average of half an inch of snow or less each year. Central Mississippi is most likely to get less than an inch of snow, but northern Mississippi can occasionally get up to two inches.

The Gulf Coast of Mississippi is a popular vacation destination. The winter months offer high temperatures in the 60s. Cities throughout the Gulf Coast, such as Biloxi and Gulfport, offer a variety of holiday events throughout the winter months. Are you a country music fan? Consider checking out Martina McBride’s The Joy of Christmas tour that kicks off in Coastal Mississippi each year.

Another great winter event in coastal Mississippi is Mardi Gras. While the event may be more commonly associated with Louisiana, Mardi Gras has a 300-year history on the Gulf Coast. There are numerous Mardi Gras events that take place beginning in January and into February.

Alabama

Alabama

Credit: Sean Pavone/ iStock

The Alabama Gulf Coast and southern Alabama are a great escape from winter flurries. Most cities in these regions average .2 inches or less of snow a year. When it comes to Mother Nature, however, surprises are always possible. Some cities in Alabama have seen record snowfall amounts of over 13 inches.

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Louisiana

Louisiana

Credit: Sean Pavone/ Shutterstock

Average snowfall throughout Louisiana is an inch or less, making this a consistently snow-free destination. Winter highs are likely to hover in the mid-60s. In addition to its temperate climate, Louisiana has one impressive draw for winter traveling: Mardi Gras!

Mardi Gras has been openly celebrated in New Orleans since the 1730s. The Mardi Gras traditions began in France and then spread to French colonies. It was brought to New Orleans by a French–Canadian explorer in 1702. The traditions and celebrations have slowly grown overtime to become what New Orleanians call the “Greatest Free Show on Earth.”

The Carnival season begins on January 6, or King’s Day, kicking off a long stretch of celebrations and events. The date of Fat Tuesday changes every year and is always the day before Ash Wednesday. Bacchus and Endymion are two of the biggest parades of the season and happen the weekend before Fat Tuesday.

Florida

Florida

Credit: Sean Pavone/ Shutterstock

Summing up the average snowfall in Florida is pretty straightforward: none. In fact, it has only snowed in Florida 16 times in the entire 21st century. The reason snow is rarely seen in Florida is because the temperatures don’t drop low enough. The average high is in the mid-60s. The consistent weather and lack of winter precipitation make Florida a great destination for vacationing. In fact, Florida is the number one destination in the United States for Canadian transplants, and one in four residents in Florida are seniors.

Florida is home to a number of attractions that make it a desirable vacation destination. One of the most well-known is Disney World, and some of the winter months are the least busy at the park. Consider planning a trip in early to mid-December or January to mid-February. If you are looking for something a bit different, consider a visit to the Kennedy Space Center or Everglades National Park.

Hawaii

Hawaii

Credit: Shane Myers Photography/ Shutterstock 

Much like Florida, Hawaii’s average yearly snowfall is non-existent. It also boasts highs in the 80s and lows in the upper 60s. Weather like this should certainly make you consider saying aloha to Hawaii in the winter months. The only place you are likely to see snow in Hawaii is at the top of the state’s three tallest volcanoes.

The hardest decision about a winter trip to Hawaii is likely to be which island to visit. One big draw for Hawaii in the winter is surfing, with many popular competitions taking place along the North Shore in Oahu. Kauai, the Big Island, and Maui also offer great surfing opportunities in the winter months. If you are looking to avoid rain, consider visiting Oahu’s Waikiki Beach, Kihei on Maui, or Kona on the Big Island. These beaches are traditionally the driest during the winter season. No matter which island you choose, it is likely to be a pleasant tropical getaway in the midst of winter.

3 Places to Visit for an Authentic Southern Experience

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

3 Places to Visit for an Authentic Southern Experience

Just like any other country, the United States is made of distinctive regions that include their own cuisine, dialect, and mannerisms. One of the most well-known areas is the American South. The South is known for its hospitality, tasty food, and unique culture. And if you’re dying for a true Southern experience that captures the region’s diversity, then you need to visit these three places.

Saint Helena Island, South Carolina

Credit: meunierd / Shutterstock.com

South Carolina is known for many things, but one of the most authentic aspects of its Lowcountry region is that of the Gullah culture. The Gullah (or Geechee) people were a segment of West Africans from present-day nations such as Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia who were brought to the United States and worked as slaves in South Carolina. However, they managed to maintain much of their original culture even during their enslavement and through emancipation. And to this day, their descendants have continued to preserve that culture through their cuisine, language and traditions.

Saint Helena Island is a popular vacation spot for families, but it’s also a prime place to immerse yourself in Gullah culture. Make your first stop at the Penn Center National Historic Landmark. The former school now serves as a museum and historical site offering some of the best preserved African-American historical records and artifacts in the South. After you’ve gotten your fill of history, get a literal taste of Gullah cuisine when you drop by Gullah Grub. Owned and operated by Bill Green, a Gullah descendant, you’ll enjoy a variety of delicious traditional Gullah chicken and seafood dishes.

Natchez, Mississippi

Credit: fdastudillo / iStock

Southern history is a dichotomous one, and Natchez is the perfect example of this reality. Before it was a city, the land was once home to the Natchez Indians until their numbers fell and the nation was absorbed into other nations like the Cherokee and Muskogee. In the 18th and 19th century, the city served as a critical terminus port for traders along the Mississippi River. And although its history is closely intertwined with American slavery and the Civil War, Natchez is also home to several pivotal moments and leaders from the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s.

Today, the city embraces its diverse history with over 20 different historical sites. You can discover more about the city ranging from Natchez’s Native American roots at the Grand Village of the Natchez Indiansto its involvement in the rise of rock ‘n roll and blues at the Delta Music Museum. After exploring the city’s rich history, you can see it through a local’s eyes by shadowing a local business owner. The tourism site, Visit Natchez, campaign “Natchezians and Natchoozians” encourages a featured local to share his or her favorite haunts and what makes the city of Natchez special in their eyes.

Dahlonega, Georgia

Credit: chadscc / iStock

When most people think of the South, they focus on the Antebellum period of the lower southern states. But Appalachian culture is also a major part of the South and deserves attention as well. Dahlonega, Georgia, is a historic town in the Peach State that was also the very first gold rush town in the nation. Located an hour north of Atlanta, the town is also a popular stop in Georgia’s wine country. This means you have plenty of excuses to drop by and drink in the local culture — pun intended.

And depending on the time of year, there are a variety of festivals that will help you appreciate the town’s picturesque location and backstory. In the fall you can drop in for the Gold Rush Days Festival that celebrates the town’s historic roots or the Dahlonega Trail Fest that highlights outdoor activities centered around their location in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

3 Places to Visit for an Authentic Southern Experience

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

3 Places to Visit for an Authentic Southern Experience

Just like any other country, the United States is made of distinctive regions that include their own cuisine, dialect, and mannerisms. One of the most well-known areas is the American South. The South is known for its hospitality, tasty food, and unique culture. And if you’re dying for a true Southern experience that captures the region’s diversity, then you need to visit these three places.

Saint Helena Island, South Carolina

Credit: meunierd / Shutterstock.com

South Carolina is known for many things, but one of the most authentic aspects of its Lowcountry region is that of the Gullah culture. The Gullah (or Geechee) people were a segment of West Africans from present-day nations such as Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia who were brought to the United States and worked as slaves in South Carolina. However, they managed to maintain much of their original culture even during their enslavement and through emancipation. And to this day, their descendants have continued to preserve that culture through their cuisine, language and traditions.

Saint Helena Island is a popular vacation spot for families, but it’s also a prime place to immerse yourself in Gullah culture. Make your first stop at the Penn Center National Historic Landmark. The former school now serves as a museum and historical site offering some of the best preserved African-American historical records and artifacts in the South. After you’ve gotten your fill of history, get a literal taste of Gullah cuisine when you drop by Gullah Grub. Owned and operated by Bill Green, a Gullah descendant, you’ll enjoy a variety of delicious traditional Gullah chicken and seafood dishes.

Natchez, Mississippi

Credit: fdastudillo / iStock

Southern history is a dichotomous one, and Natchez is the perfect example of this reality. Before it was a city, the land was once home to the Natchez Indians until their numbers fell and the nation was absorbed into other nations like the Cherokee and Muskogee. In the 18th and 19th century, the city served as a critical terminus port for traders along the Mississippi River. And although its history is closely intertwined with American slavery and the Civil War, Natchez is also home to several pivotal moments and leaders from the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s.

Today, the city embraces its diverse history with over 20 different historical sites. You can discover more about the city ranging from Natchez’s Native American roots at the Grand Village of the Natchez Indiansto its involvement in the rise of rock ‘n roll and blues at the Delta Music Museum. After exploring the city’s rich history, you can see it through a local’s eyes by shadowing a local business owner. The tourism site, Visit Natchez, campaign “Natchezians and Natchoozians” encourages a featured local to share his or her favorite haunts and what makes the city of Natchez special in their eyes.

Dahlonega, Georgia

Credit: chadscc / iStock

When most people think of the South, they focus on the Antebellum period of the lower southern states. But Appalachian culture is also a major part of the South and deserves attention as well. Dahlonega, Georgia, is a historic town in the Peach State that was also the very first gold rush town in the nation. Located an hour north of Atlanta, the town is also a popular stop in Georgia’s wine country. This means you have plenty of excuses to drop by and drink in the local culture — pun intended.

And depending on the time of year, there are a variety of festivals that will help you appreciate the town’s picturesque location and backstory. In the fall you can drop in for the Gold Rush Days Festival that celebrates the town’s historic roots or the Dahlonega Trail Fest that highlights outdoor activities centered around their location in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains.

GOP Senator Who Made ‘Hanging’ Remark Attended ‘Segregated’ Academy

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HUFFINGTON POST)

 

GOP Senator Who Made ‘Hanging’ Remark Attended ‘Segregated’ Academy

Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith recently drew criticism for remarks condoning public hangings and the Confederacy.
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Cindy Hyde-Smith, the Republican Mississippi senator who made comments condoning “public hangings,” attended a “segregated” school when she was younger, the Jackson Free Press reported Friday after unearthing a 1975 yearbook photo.

The school, Lawrence County Academy, was set up for white parents to avoid sending their children to school with black children, according to the Free Press. Many such schools, dubbed “segregation academies,” were created in the South following desegregation as inexpensive, private educational options.

Hyde-Smith is identified in a caption beneath the yearbook photograph, which shows a row of cheerleaders smiling as they lie on the ground, propped up on their elbows, as a girl dressed in what seems to be Civil War–era regalia stands in the center holding an apparent Confederate flag.

Lawrence County Academy was established in 1970, one year after the U.S. Supreme Court ordered Mississippi to desegregate its schools. For 15 years after desegregation became law of the land, Mississippi dragged its feet on integrating black and white students.

A former student who provided the photo to the newspaper said she realized at the time that her parents sent her to Lawrence County Academy to avoid interactions with black students. Segregation was not openly acknowledged at the school, she said.

Hyde-Smith sent her daughter to a similar school, Brookhaven Academy, which is nearly all white despite being located in a majority-black town.

The senator faces Democratic challenger Mike Espy in a special election Nov. 27. She was appointed by Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant to fill the seat vacated in April by former Sen. Thad Cochran, who stepped down for health reasons.

Hyde-Smith has been heavily criticized this month for making racist comments on the Confederate South.

In a state with an ugly history of terrorizing African-Americans with lynchings, Hyde-Smith said of a local rancher in early November, “If he invited me to a public hanging, I’d be on the front row.” Espy called the comment “reprehensible.”

Although she later apologized for her remark, she accused her opponents of twisting her words for political gain.

A 2014 Facebook post in which Hyde-Smith praises Confederate history subsequently surfaced. Alongside a smiling photo of herself in a Confederate hat and holding a rifle at a museum exhibit, the senator wrote, “Mississippi history at its best!”

She also appeared to voice support for voter suppression at a campaign stop earlier this month, telling constituents “maybe we want to make it just a little more difficult” to vote due to the “liberal folks in those other schools who maybe we don’t want to vote.”

“And I think that’s a great idea,” she said.

President Donald Trump, of whom Hyde-Smith has been a vocal supporter, will hold two rallies in Mississippi on Monday to whip up support for the Republican candidate.

Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of a Mississippi law that protects people who oppose gay marriage

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE CHRISTIAN POST)

A three-judge panel of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled in favor of a Mississippi law that protects people who oppose gay marriage on religious grounds from being sued.

(Photo: Reuters/Mike Blake)Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant arrives to attend B.B. King’s funeral in Indianola, Mississippi, May 30, 2015.

In a unanimous decision issued Thursday, the panel concluded that the plaintiffs lacked the standing to sue the state over House Bill 1523, also called the Protecting Freedom of Conscience from Government Discrimination Act, reversing a lower court’s decision.

“The governor of Mississippi and the executive director of the Mississippi Department of Human Services appeal a preliminary injunction. Because the plaintiffs do not have standing, we reverse the injunction and render a judgment of dismissal,” wrote Circuit Judge Jerry Smith on behalf of the panel.

In April 2016, Mississippi Governor Phil Bryant signed HB 1523 into law, which prohibits the state from compelling businesses and individuals from supporting or servicing gay weddings.

(Photo: Reuters/David McNew)A same-sex wedding cake topper is seen outside the East Los Angeles County Recorder’s Office on Valentine’s Day during a news event for National Freedom to Marry Week in Los Angeles, Calif., Feb. 14, 2012.

“The sincerely held religious beliefs or moral convictions protected by this act are the belief or conviction that: (a) Marriage is or should be recognized as the union of one man and one woman; (b) Sexual relations are properly reserved to such a marriage; and (c) Male (man) or female (woman) refer to an individual’s immutable biological sex as objectively determined by anatomy and genetics at time of birth,” reads HB 1523 in part.

LGBT groups and their allies denounced the legislation and sued to have it struck down. For his part, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo issued an executive order last year banning non-essential state travel to Mississippi.

“[I]t is the policy of the state of New York to promote fairness, protect the welfare of the citizens of the state of New York, and combat discrimination,” read Cuomo’s 2016 order.

“All agencies, departments, boards, authorities and commissions [will] review all requests for state funded or state sponsored travel to the state of Mississippi so long as there is law in effect there that permits and enshrines discrimination against LGBT citizens and unmarried individuals …” Cuomo’s order added.

Last summer, Judge Carlton W. Reeves blocked Mississippi’s law from taking effect, concluding that it was “a vehicle for state-sanctioned discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation and gender identity.”

Family Research Council President Tony Perkins said in a statement Thursday that he commended the panel’s ruling on the “commonsense law.”

“No person should be punished by the government with crippling fines or face disqualification for simply believing what President Obama believed until five years ago, that marriage is the union of a man and a woman,” said Perkins.

“Today’s ruling leaves us more confident that the courts will uphold the ability of elected officials to protect the freedom of their citizens to believe and live according to those beliefs”

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Read more at http://www.christianpost.com/news/faith-based-business-owners-wont-be-forced-serve-gay-weddings-mississippi-appeals-court-rules-189278/#D4ljHrmCXmHwz8dC.99

Read more at http://www.christianpost.com/news/faith-based-business-owners-wont-be-forced-serve-gay-weddings-mississippi-appeals-court-rules-189278/#0jjFfAGKXVH9qOiS.99

Kansas Clerk Shot By Suspected Killer In Manhunt Recalls Ordeal

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NBC NEWS)

Kansas Clerk Shot by Suspected Killer in Manhunt Recalls Ordeal

A 19-year-old store clerk in Kansas who was shot by a murder suspect on the run from authorities Wednesday said he’s lucky to be alive.

Alex Deaton, who police suspect in two murders and two other shootings, shot Riley Juel at point-blank range after taking his car keys hours before his alleged crime spree would come to an end.

“This can’t be real at all, and then, I mean it came back to me, this is real,” Juel told NBC affiliate KSNW in Wichita, a day after he was shot by suspect Alex Deaton in Pratt.

“I was just scared I was going to die,” Juel told the station.

Convenience store clerk Riley Juel recovers at the hospital in Wichita, Kansas, on March 2. Maria Loving / Christi Health via AP

Deaton, 28, fled in Juel’s Cadillac and was caught after a high-speed chase with the Kansas Highway Patrol that ended in a fiery crash, police said.

Deaton is suspected in the murder of his girlfriend, 30-year-old Heather Robinson, whose body was found at her Rankin County, Mississippi home on Friday. He is also suspected of being involved in the death of a woman found fatally shot at her Neshoba County church on Thursday.

Deaton had been chased by sheriff’s deputies earlier Wednesday morning, but the stolen car he was driving was disabled by stop sticks and he entered the Kwik Shop and demanded Juel’s keys, authorities said.

After Juel handed the keys over, he said Deaton shot him at point-blank range and fled. Juel called 911 and thanked the dispatcher and a police officer who arrived on the scene. “If it wasn’t for them, I probably would have been dead,” he told the station.

image: Alex Deaton
Alex Deaton, 28, is suspected of killing two people and shooting a store clerk in a three-state crime spree. MBI via WLBT

Juel is stable at a hospital. Jule’s sister, Brooke Juel, told the KSNW her brother’s call to police helped catch the suspect, and called him a hero.

Deaton also allegedly shot a jogger at random from his vehicle in Mississippi on Friday, and carjacked and briefly kidnapped a couple at a trailhead near Albuquerque on Tuesday.

During the carjacking and kidnapping, Deaton shot a man in the buttocks and a bullet grazed a woman as they escaped, the Rankin County, Mississippi, sheriff’s office said.

Also Friday, Deaton’s family said in a statement that they are “in a state of disbelief” and are fully cooperating with law enforcement.

“Our family is deeply shocked, saddened and horrified at all that has unfolded since last Wednesday,” Deaton’s family said in a statement to NBC affiliate WLBT in Jackson.

“We are devastated and completely heartbroken for all that has happened. Our family is in a state of disbelief. We don’t understand why or how this could ever happen and are just thankful it has now come to an end,” the statement said. The family expressed condolences to the victims and their families.

Rankin County, Mississippi, Sheriff Bryan Bailey says investigators hoped to talk to Deaton Thursday afternoon. Authorities are expected to seek extradition to Mississippi.

Image:
This handout photo shows an overturned vehicle following a police chase that ended in the capture of suspected killer Alex Deaton on March 1, 2017 near Wilson, Kansas. Kansas Highway Patrol via AP

President Trump’s Voter Fraud Expert Was Registered to Vote in Three States

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME MAGAZINE)

 

President Trump’s Voter Fraud Expert Was Registered to Vote in Three States

8:56 PM Eastern
(SAN FRANCISCO) — A man who President Donald Trump has promoted as an authority on voter fraud was registered to vote in multiple states during the 2016 presidential election, the Associated Press has learned.

Gregg Phillips, whose unsubstantiated claim that the election was marred by 3 million illegal votes was tweeted by the president, was listed on the rolls in Alabama, Texas and Mississippi, according to voting records and election officials in those states. He voted only in Alabama in November, records show.

In a post earlier this month, Phillips described “an amazing effort” by volunteers tied to True the Vote, an organization whose board he sits on, who he said found “thousands of duplicate records and registrations of dead people.”

Trump has made an issue of people who are registered to vote in more than one state, using it as one of the bedrock of his overall contention that voter fraud is rampant in the U.S. and that voting by 3 to 5 million immigrants illegally in the country cost him the popular vote in November.

The AP found that Phillips was registered in Alabama and Texas under the name Gregg Allen Phillips, with the identical Social Security number. Mississippi records list him under the name Gregg A. Phillips, and that record includes the final four digits of Phillips’ Social Security number, his correct date of birth and a prior address matching one once attached to Gregg Allen Phillips. He has lived in all three states.

At the time of November’s presidential election, Phillips’ status was “inactive” in Mississippi and suspended in Texas. Officials in both states told the AP that Phillips could have voted, however, by producing identification and updating his address at the polls.

Citing concerns about voters registered in several states, the president last week called for a major investigation into his claim of voter fraud, despite his campaign lawyer’s conclusion that the 2016 election was “not tainted.”

“When you look at the people that are registered, dead, illegal and two states, and some cases maybe three states, we have a lot to look into,” Trump said in an ABC interview.

Reached by telephone Monday, Phillips said he was unaware of his multiple registrations but asked, “Why would I know or care?”

“Doesn’t that just demonstrate how broken the system is?” he asked. “That is not fraud — that is a broken system. We need a national ID that travels with people.”

Phillips has been in the national spotlight since Nov. 11, when he tweeted without evidence that his completed analysis of voter registrations concluded the “number of non-citizen votes exceeded 3 million.”

Thousands of people liked and retweeted the claim, which led to a viral article three days later on InfoWars.com, a site known to traffic in conspiracy theories.

Phillips also has previously tweeted about the dangers of “inactive voters” being able to vote in U.S. elections. “There is already law that compels states to remove inactive voters. Many don’t,” Phillips tweeted Nov. 29.

According to media reports, five Trump family members or top administration officials also were registered to vote in two states during the 2016 election — chief White House strategist Stephen Bannon; Press Secretary Sean Spicer; Treasury Secretary nominee Steven Mnuchin; Tiffany Trump, the president’s youngest daughter; and Jared Kushner, Trump’s son-in-law and a senior White House adviser.

The Houston-based True the Vote has challenged the validity of voter rolls in numerous states. On Friday, Phillips tweeted that the conservative group “will lead the analysis” of widespread voter fraud, and suggested in a CNN interview that it might release the underlying data in a few months.

Shortly after Phillips appeared on CNN on Friday, Trump tweeted: “Look forward to seeing the final results of VoteStand. Gregg Phillips and crew say at least 3,000,000 votes were illegal. We must do better!”

___

AP reporters Emily Wagster Pettus in Jackson, Mississippi, and Kim Chandler in Montgomery, Alabama, contributed to this report

Poem About: 30 Years Driving Tractor Tailor Around America

 

Raised to be factory bait for all my adult daily life

Viewed into peculiar peoples lives, I was bless to know

Mostly hard working, mostly good people, trying to live a life

Heart, mind, and eye, you dared to break free from the assembly line

Minds eye, Geography, History, Real People, real Lives being Lived

18 Wheels, learn the job to see Our Country, stem to stern

It’s not just your job, it is your life, your consuming future

Hard Top high life, seeing Our Country, on the Big Screen

Many type of people, a plethora of life styles, and Races

Core of all people, we are all the same, need the same things

 

Big Cities, so many rushing about, with really no place to go

Working so hard, just to be back in the same place tomorrow

Freedom of the Wheel, you see life in the fast and the slow

Friendly even way up north, above the Ohio water stripe

Flat lands, Corn, Cattle, Colorado, and the Mississippi

Big Hills, big snows, beautiful landscape, Beasts still roam

In Gold and Silver, Great Parks, just waiting for your boots

 

Left Coast can produce beautiful life styles, Sunsets, Heaven sent

Beautiful Gulf Coast, Alabama and God’s beautiful Spring Southern Rains

Silver mines galore in those South East Appalachian Foothills of Thrills

Morning wake up in the freezer, noon rains, roasting in an evening desert

Life behind now, by my body, not my truck in the end betrayed me

The Job lets your eyes, ears, and brain take a look around at what is real

30 Years behind the wheel you learn your Country’s Soul, stem to stern!

 

(Humor/Poem) Wagons West

Wagons West

 

Wagon west from Virginia’s foothills

Six kids in the family

Four wheels of wood and steel

Two mules a straining at the whip

Bluegrass Appalachian foothills

Ohio river first then the mighty Mississippi

Cherokee arrows, thankful Lord, they all missed

Camping under the arch, evening sun pointing west

Wagon master hollering, everyone get in line

If the weather holds, and no injuns attack

We should all be at our new home soon

Spearfish Dakota, in about three week’s time

Mr. Custer says is no need to worry about Sioux

Says their running scared of the bugle and the blue

The train, we got six injuns riding point

You can see the hate of us in their eyes

Mr. Custer, on your words

Thirty families risk their lives

We had not yet cleared Nebraska

News came, yellow hair and the 7th

Would ride these plains no more

One more week we made the Black Hills

Land of gold, coal, and lumber

O yes and several thousand Sioux on every side

Now my family and I are all six feet under

In this cold ground we had hoped one day to plow

She's a Frustrated Traveler

Shout out to YOLO!

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