6 Ancient Maya Ruins to Explore

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

6 Ancient Maya Ruins to Explore

The Maya civilization dates back to 2600 BC and lasted over 3,000 years, leaving behind a legacy of amazing agricultural, architectural and scientific achievements. One of the longest lasting pieces of this legacy are the incredible structures and monuments that still exist today. Here are six ancient Maya ruins you can explore. It’s also worth noting that the term “Mayan” is generally used only to refer to the language. “Maya” refers to the people and cultures that make up the complex and diverse indigenous population.

Tikal, Guatemala

Credit: cnicbc / iStock

Tikal, thought to be the capital of the Maya civilization, is located deep in the Guatemalan jungle. Because it is centered in such a lush environment and has been unoccupied for centuries, archaeologists estimate that only about 25 percent of the ruins have been uncovered. However, the ruins that have been revealed are stunning. They include six massive temples, some of which are over 200 feet tall. Be prepared for a crowd, however. Despite the location’s remote jungle location, the site draws over 100,000 visitors every year.

Uxmal, Mexico

Credit: Markus Faymonville / iStock

This UNESCO World Heritage Site is home to the Pyramid of the Magician, a massive monument that was built in multiple stages. In fact, Uxmal means “thrice-built” and is a reference to the long process of erecting the pyramid. At the height of its occupancy, Uxmal was the largest population center on the Yucatan Peninsula. It covers over 50 acres, and the pyramid isn’t the only impressive ruin on the premises: The famed Governor’s Palace is larger than a football field and has the largest façade of any structure in pre-Colombian Mesoamerica.

Tulum, Mexico

Credit: traveler1116 / iStock

Many Maya ruins are deep in the jungle, which makes them hard to access and susceptible to being reclaimed by the vegetation that slowly consumes everything in its path. That is not the case with Tulum, however, which is located on the beautiful Caribbean coastline, about 100 miles south of Cancun, Mexico. Tulum was one of the last large Maya settlements to be built and was constructed as recently as 1200 AD. As a result, the many limestone temples that remain are well-preserved and make an excellent destination to explore.

Xunatunich, Belize

Credit: pxhidalgo / iStock

This often-overlooked ruin, which lies about 70 miles west of Belize City, is well worth the journey. It features six plazas and over 26 structures. This includes the El Castillo of Belize, which is the second-highest structure in Belize. Xunatunich was a civic ceremonial center during an era when 200,000 Maya lived in the area now known as Belize.

Copan, Honduras

Credit: benedek / iStock

Copan is one of the oldest known cities of the Maya world, having been first occupied in 1500 BC. It is in Honduras near the Guatemalan border and is home to many altars and monoliths. There are five full plazas, one of which, the Hieroglyphic Stairway Plaza, features the longest known Maya inscription, with over 1,800 glyphs.

Chichen Itza, Mexico

Credit: JoselgnacioSoto / iStock

No list of Maya ruins would be complete without Chichen Itza. Chichen Itza is considered one of the seven “New Wonders of the World” and is in the heart of Mexico. Chichen Itza features the famous El Castillo, a 98-foot-high temple built between the 9th and 12th centuries. El Castillo is not only an impressive monument but is a testament to the advanced understanding of astronomy the Maya possessed. The sides of the pyramid are aligned in such a way that during the autumn and spring equinoxes the shadow cast by the mid-afternoon sun creates the appearance of a snake crawling down the side of the structure. Chichen Itza is home to Cenate Segrado, a place of worship and sacrifice for the Maya, and the Great Ball Court, the largest ball court of ancient Mesoamerica.

The Maya weren’t the only civilization to leave behind incredible ruins that you can still explore. Read more from us about the ancient world, from all corners of the globe.

4 Best Countries to Retire In

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

4 Best Countries to Retire In

With great exchange rates, beautiful weather, and locals welcoming of U.S. expats, it’s not surprising these four countries to our south stand out as retirement meccas. One of them, Mexico, is so close and so easy to assimilate to, it makes perfect sense to shift your life and assets south of the border for the golden years. Slightly more exotic and further afield, Central American and South American locales with tropical tendencies and inexpensive living round out the righteous retirement roster.

Ecuador

Credit: f11photo/Shutterstock

Straddling the equator on the west coast of South America, Ecuador is where diverse geographies and ecosystems collide, with the Amazon jungle, Andean highlands, and the wildlife-rich Galápagos Islands all lying within the country’s boundaries. This confluence of land forms equates to excellent weather throughout the entire country, for sunshiny days without the mugginess factor.

The capital, Quito, sits at an elevation of nearly 10,000 feet in the Andean foothills, with a moderate mountain climate most of the year. Quito is renowned for its intact Spanish colonial center, palaces, and churches — along with big-city conveniences. Head down to the coast for warm weather all year. With reasonable beachfront real estate prices and low property taxes, retirees get a lot for their money here. Consider that a home on the Pacific Ocean can be had for $150,000, and that home prices and rental rates in the interior are far less expensive than that. So whether you prefer lush green valleys, ocean views, or mountain village life, Ecuador is a retirement dream.

Mexico

Credit: photopixel/Shutterstock

If you are concerned about how far your Social Security earnings might go after retirement — or if you simply want to retire more extravagantly — Mexico is an obvious choice for life after work. The cost of living is so low that you can, in many places, subsist quite substantially on Social Security alone. Factor in the solid exchange rate, and Mexico just makes sense.

Beyond cost, there is the wonderful culture and climate of our southern neighbor to take into account. Sandwiched between the southern U.S. and Central America, Mexico boasts both Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Mexico beaches for miles. The huge, ecologically diverse country also enjoys desert, mountain, and jungle landscapes throughout its many regions. From small beach towns like Cancun to the metropolis of Mexico City, retirees will find a country steeped in the ancient and the modern. Throughout the country are scattered important archaeological sites such as  Teotihuacán and the Mayan city of Chichén Itzá, along with Spanish colonial-era historic towns. Meanwhile, Mexico City’s trendy shops, world-class museums and gourmet dining display modern Mexico.

Costa Rica

Credit: SL-Photography/Shutterstock

With pristine coastal beaches on both the Caribbean and Pacific shores, Costa Rica is a tropical paradise, yet in contrast its interior is a rugged, rain-forested area studded with volcanoes. Much of the country – about a quarter of it – is protected jungle preserves with thriving biodiversity and wildlife, such as spider monkeys and exotic quetzal birds. Areas humans do inhabit are known for wonderful climate, an incredible cost of living, bargain real estate prices, and quality health care.

The capital is San Jose, where the climate is referred to as “eternal spring,” if that gives you an idea how nice it is year-round. The same is true for the rest of the surrounding Central Valley. Coastal beach towns are hot and dry, but benefit from cooling marine breezes, while the lush landscape in the southern part of the country remains moist and temperate. With such great weather, Costa Rico is perfect for outdoor-loving, active retirees into fishing, golf, horseback riding, hiking, diving, or yoga.

Panama

Credit: Gualberto Becerra/Shutterstock

Look at it this way: Not only is Panama modern and convenient — with close access back to the U.S. to visit the grand-kids — but it’s also a tropical paradise. Even if you choose to live in the capital, Panama City, amidst the modern hustle, your city park is a tropical rain-forest. Taking up the center of the isthmus linking Central and South America, Panama is famous for its Panama Canal, which was sliced through the center of the country in order to link the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, creating an essential and strategic international trade route.

Panama City’s modern skyscrapers, casinos, and nightclubs are juxtaposed with historic colonial buildings, many in the Casco Viejo district. As mentioned, Natural Metropolitan Park is a large patch of rain-forest preserved in the city. With no taxes on income earned outside of Panama, retirees can keep costs low even in metro Panama City. For even more value, head to more remote mountain and beach towns for pretty scenery and peaceful vibes, places such as Coronado, the Pedasi region and Bocas del Toro, among other retirement gems. No wonder Panama ranked at the top of the 2019 Annual Global Retirement Index.

7 Beaches Where You Don’t Want to Swim

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

7 Beaches Where You Don’t Want to Swim

Some beaches, while beautiful, have hidden perils, reasons someone sunbathing shouldn’t cool off with a dip. To help you out, we’ve compiled a list of beaches where you’ll definitely don’t want to go swimming.

Chowpatty Beach, Mumbai, India

Chowpatty Beach, Mumbai, India

Credit: pjhpix/Shutterstock

You might be able to figure this one out for yourself when you’re close up, but despite the many beaches within the city, none are safe for bathing. While Chowpatty Beach is Mumbai’s most popular beach and is the host of the city’s annual celebration in honor of the Hindu god Ganesh, it is littered with waste and debris. Large amounts of untreated sewage reach the coastline and, with steadily increasing pollution levels, any beach-goer is at serious risk of infection.

New Smyrna Beach, Florida, U.S.A.

New Smyrna Beach, Florida, U.S.A.

Credit: Javier Cruz Acosta/Shutterstock

The warm climate and incredible surf at New Smyrna Beach in Florida tempt its visitors to jump in the water. But it’s what’s lurking underneath that’s the trouble. Due to the volume of attacks, the beach has gained the title of “shark capital of the world.” The sharks are attracted by large populations of fish as well as the floating surfboards overhead; it’s the ideal snacking ground. While none of the attacks on humans have been fatal, and die-hard surfers continue to jump in, we wouldn’t recommend it.

Hanakapiai Beach, Kauai, Hawaii

Hanakapiai Beach, Kauai, Hawaii

Credit: MNStudio/Shutterstock

The islands of Hawaii are renowned for their glorious beaches, and as idyllic settings go, you can’t get much more perfect than Hanakapiai Beach. A well-known checkpoint in Hawaii, visitors trek a rocky, 3.2-kilometer hiking trail to get there. The temptation to jump in and cool off is overwhelming. However, as the area isn’t protected by any reef, its currents are vicious. Powerful rip currents are capable of pulling even the most experienced swimmers out to sea. With no lifeguards, no hope of rescue and a handmade sign with a death-tally on it as a stark reminder of the water’s power, you’d be mad to chance it.

Category IconGeneral
3pts

Daily trivia question

Today’s Trivia Question

What are South America’s only 2 landlocked countries?

PLAY!Plane icon

Fraser Island, Queensland, Australia

Fraser Island, Queensland, Australia

Credit: Benedikt Juerges/Shutterstock

Fraser Island boasts one of the most awe-inspiring beaches in the world, stretching an incredible 120 kilometers along its east coast. While the crystal clear waters try to lure visitors in, there is more than one threat waiting. Underneath the water, nearly invisible box jellyfish are lurking, able to kill a full-grown adult with their sting. If the jellyfish don’t get you, then the many sharks in the bay will be next in line. On top of all that, the tides can be vicious. It seems the beaches on the Island aren’t meant for human paddlers.

Gansbaai Beach, Gansbaai, South Africa

Gansbaai Beach, Gansbaai, South Africa

Credit: Natursports/Shutterstock

While Florida has gained the title for shark capital of the world, Gansbaai is home to the most great white sharks. The sharks are attracted to the area because of the huge colony of fur seals, which live in the water between Dyer Island and Geyser Rock. The channel, known as shark alley, is a stretch of water to be feared. If you like to get your adrenaline pumping, you can book a cage dive. You can get up close and personal with the world’s most notorious shark and live to tell the tale.

Playa Zipolite, Oaxaca, Mexico

Playa Zipolite, Oaxaca, Mexico

Credit: Stefano Ember/Shutterstock

With a nickname “The Beach of the Dead,” Playa Zipolite is no place for a casual swim. The beach is picturesque, and the dangers are certainly hidden to the naked eye. In fact, they are also hidden to all the naked people; the beach is popular with backpackers and nudists. The danger comes from the giant waves that create extremely dangerous undercurrents. Swimmers are easily pulled out into the water. The introduction of a specialized lifeguard crew has reduced the number of drownings, but you’re safer sunbathing on the sand.

The Black Sand Beaches, Kilauea, Hawaii

The Black Sand Beaches, Kilauea, Hawaii

Credit: Robin Runck/Shutterstock

The black sand beaches of Kilauea, located in Volcanoes National Park, are certainly beautiful. The sand is an incredible contrast to the golden sands we’re used to elsewhere, and the water looks eerily inviting. However, a beach located next to one of the world’s most active volcanoes, Mount Kilauea, needs to be approached with caution. The temperature of the water can reach up to about 110 degrees. You’ll want to be careful not to burn your toes. Don’t let that stop you visiting though, having erupted as recently as last year, there are new black sand beaches to explore, and the area needs tourism more than ever.

7 Up-and-Coming Wine Regions

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

7 Up-and-Coming Wine Regions

When people think of high-end wine producers, regions such as Napa Valley, Bordeaux, Burgundy and Piedmont are the powerhouses that usually make the list. However, if you want to try something new, without significantly sacrificing on quality, consider sourcing wines from one of these seven up-and-coming wine regions.

Anderson Valley, California, U.S.A.

Credit: Balaraman Arun/Shutterstock

Given its remote location several hours north of San Francisco, the Anderson Valley doesn’t see as many vineyard hoppers as Napa and Sonoma. That doesn’t mean the wines aren’t worth it, though. The cool climate has shown tremendous success with both pinot noir and chardonnay grapes, perfect as well for producing French-style sparkling wines. Today, Anderson Valley produces some of the best sparkling wines in the country.

Rias Baixas, Spain

Credit: Pabkov/Shutterstock

Rias Baixas is located along the Galician coast in Spain. There are a number of small inlets, called rias, where you’ll find nutrient-rich waters. The water plays a big role in making Rias Baixas wine so delicious. One wine variety that has shown significant success is albariño, a white wine with a nice blend of minerality and acidity.

Finger Lakes, New York, U.S.A.

Credit: Albert Pego/Shutterstock

New York is one of the largest wine producers in the country, thanks in part to the Finger Lakes region that is producing some phenomenal cool-climate wines, especially rieslings. There are more than 200 brands of rieslings produced in the Finger Lakes region alone. Impressive for a wine region that only really established itself in the early 1980s.

Kakheti, Georgia

Credit: Ruslan Kalnitsky/Shutterstock

The country of Georgia has been producing wines since at least 6,000 B.C., based on archaeological excavations that uncovered qvevri, a traditional winemaking vessel that allowed ancient winemakers to ferment wine underground. Today, wines produced in this mountainous region of Georgia utilize both traditional and modern techniques. UNESCO has since recognized the importance of the qvevri winemaking tradition, adding it to UNESCO’s list of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity.

Beqaa Valley, Lebanon

Credit: Areej Khaddaj/Shutterstock

Lebanon is another place where winemaking traditions date back quite a ways. Even in modern times, Lebanese wineries have faced their share of challenges, including Château Musar, which still managed to produce wine throughout the horrific civil war that tore Lebanon apart between 1975 and 1990. When the war ended, there were only around five wineries left in Lebanon. By 2014, that number had jumped to almost 50. While French grapes primarily dominate here, there are some local Lebanese wine grapes like merwah and obaideh present.

Valle de Guadalupe, Mexico

Credit: Sherry V Smith/Shutterstock

When most people think about Mexico and drinks, they probably picture tequila, mezcal and beer, not wine. Mexico is bucking the stereotypes and demonstrating that it has areas that are capable of producing award-winning wines as well. The mountainous terrain helps cool the hot summer days, allowing the grapes to flourish.

Texas Hill Country, Texas, U.S.A.

Credit: MaxBaumann/iStock

The hot and dry climate of Texas is not the ideal condition you’d think of for an up-and-coming wine region, but Texas Hill Country is producing some pretty incredible wines, especially big reds. The climate is working well for varietals like tempranillo, syrah and tannat.

Mexico vows to take legal action against U.S. after deadly El Paso shooting

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NBC NEWS)

 

Mexico vows to take legal action against U.S. after deadly El Paso shooting

At least three of the 20 dead in Saturday’s attack, described by Mexico’s foreign minister as an “act of barbarism,” are Mexican nationals.
Image: Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard attends a press conference in Mexico City on July 22, 2019.

Mexican Foreign Minister Marcelo Ebrard attends a press conference in Mexico City on July 22, 2019.Daniel Aguilar / AFP – Getty Images file

India: Amid ongoing trade war, China no longer top trading partner of US

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF INDIA’S HINDUSTAN TIMES)

 

Amid ongoing trade war, China no longer top trading partner of US

America’s neighbors Mexico and Canada have replaced China.

WORLD Updated: Aug 03, 2019 10:05 IST

Press Trust of India

Press Trust of India

Washington
China is no longer the top trading partner of the United States.
China is no longer the top trading partner of the United States.(AP Photo)

As a result of their ongoing trade war, China is no longer the top trading partner of the United States and has been replaced by America’s neighbors Mexico and Canada, according to a media report.

In the first half of the year, Mexico was the top trading partner of the United States followed by Canada, the latest official data reveals, according to The Wall Street Journal.

As a result of the ongoing trade war between the US and China, imports from China to the US dropped by 12 per cent and America’s export to China fell by 19 per cent, the daily said. After coming to power, Trump has imposed 25 per cent import tariff on Chinese products worth USD 250 billion.

Another 10 per cent tariff on products worth USD 300 billion will come into effect on September 1. Trump has so far maintained that China has been unfair to the US. China has also taken several retaliatory steps. According to a Commerce Department report, the total value of bilateral goods exchanged with China fell 14 per cent in the first half of the year to USD 271.04 billion, The Wall Street Journal said. ` “After holding the top spot among US trading partners from 2015 to 2018, China now sits at No. 3 and now smaller than Mexico for the first time since 2005,” it said.

(The story has been published from a wire feed without any modifications to the text, only the headline has been changed)

First Published: Aug 03, 2019 09:35 IST

China, Trump And Tariffs: My Idea On How To Best Do The Tariffs

China, Trump And Tariffs: My Idea On How To Best Do The Tariffs

 

First, the government of China is no one’s friend just as Putin’s government in Russia nor is the fat little Rocket Man in North Korea. I know that statement will bring a rebuke from Mr. Trump who thinks these guys love him, but then again, he is possibly the world’s biggest idiot. I did not say that the people of these countries are ass-hats like their Leaders and Ours are. I have nothing against the people of these Countries, just their Leaders, and our Leaders.

 

Now, about those tariff’s, this is what I wish our government’s policies were toward China. Personally I believe that the whole world should stop buying anything that has to do with China as long as they have a Communists government in place who seems to think that everything on earth should be theirs to control, including all the land, oceans and air space. When anyone buys anything that is made in China you are feeding their military buildup that they will use to subjugate their own people and the people of the Nations around them.

 

But for a more doable emmediate tariff policy I believe the following approach should be adopted. Instead of having a trade war with China via tariff’s I believe that our government should only put tariffs on products that are coming into the U.S. from companies who have outsourced jobs that used to be here in our Country.  Including to China, Indonesia, Vietnam, Mexico or any other Nation. For the purpose of an example let us use General Motors. If General Motors wants into the Chinese market for the purpose of making vehicles for the Chinese market I have no problem with that at all. But, if they take jobs away from our people and then want to sell in our market I believe that our government needs to put a 100% tariffs on all of those imports. Make it very un-profitable for the company to take away American jobs if they want to sell to our market. This program would keep American companies from closing factories here and it would force the companies who have closed shops here to reinvest in our Nation, not an enemy Nation like China.

 

As I said earlier, the people of China are not our enemy, but their government damn sure is. And, in my opinion, companies who have outsourced American jobs for the sole purpose of higher profits should be treated as enemies of the American people. If you have noticed, when a company closes shop here in the States and moves to a “cheaper” place to make their products they never ever lower the prices they sell their products for. If a company made a product here in the States and sold it for $20 then they close shop here and move to China they still sell the product for $20, the name of the game is all and only about profits, to hell with the people, they only want your money. We need to quit giving it to them. Force them to move back here, if they refuse then tariff the hell out of them and also sell all of their stock, don’t allow it to be sold on the U.S Stock Exchange, bankrupt their asses. If our Leaders really want to put America, then prove it!

10 Most Populated Cities in the World

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

10 Most Populated Cities in the World

Earth is home to more than 7.7 billion people and we have to put them somewhere. For millions of people, cities are that somewhere, with everyone existing next to each other with varying degrees of comfort. These are the 10 most populated cities in the world, according to the World Population Review.

Osaka, Japan | 19.2 Million

Credit: xavierarnau/iStock

For tourists, Osaka is about two things. The first is eating. The Japanese term “kuidaore,” which translates to “eat yourself broke” or “eat until you drop,” is frequently used to describe the city. The second is shopping. The city is full of stores, outlets, malls, bodegas, stalls and vendors. Between those two, you should have a pretty good idea of what your itinerary will be full of in Osaka.

Beijing, China | 20 Million

Credit: SeanPavonePhoto/iStock

There’s some irony in the fact that 20 million people have such ready access to the Forbidden City, a palace that traditionally carried strict, and often fatal, punishment for unauthorized visitors. Though not ironic is the fact that Beijing remains the seat of the Chinese government. That was the original point of the Forbidden City, after all.

Mumbai, India | 20.2 Million

Credit: saiko3p/Shutterstock

Mumbai is another one of those old cities that was renamed by the British empire, and has made the modern decision to change back. That’s why some readers may recognize the name Bombay, which was the name of the city up until 1995, when the political party Shiv Sena came to power in the city. Whatever you call it, there are a lot of people living in the city.

Dhaka, Bangladesh | 20.3 Million

Credit: travelview/Shutterstock

For a city with so many people, we haven’t heard a whole lot about Dhaka. It’s the capital of Bangladesh, so that’s something. It kind of makes it seem like a city of more than 20 million people is some kind of well-kept secret. Not to Bangladeshis, obviously, but to the rest of us.

Cairo, Egypt | 20.5 Million

Credit: Prin Adulyatham/Shutterstock

Unlike the other cities on this list, Cairo’s population growth is apparently on track for disaster. Just 11 years from now, in 2030, the city’s projected to hit 119 million and the government’s scrambling for solutions. Hopefully they figure something out quickly because 11 years is pretty much the blink of an eye when it comes to city planning.

Mexico City, Mexico | 21.7 Million

Credit: DC_Colombia/iStock

Mexico City’s origins are in some very cool terraforming done by the Aztecs. They expanded a small natural island in Lake Texcoco into an island large enough to house their fortified city, Tenochtitlán, by dumping dirt into the lake until the island was big enough. Today, the sprawl of Mexico City has far exceeded what the island could have held.

São Paulo, Brazil | 21.8 Million

Credit: f11photo/Shutterstock

São Paulo’s size caught us a little off guard. Rio de Janeiro is in the news so often that it’s almost like the default Brazilian city. But São Paulo’s population beats Rio’s by millions. It’s a financial center for Brazil but doesn’t sacrifice culture to achieve it. Case in point, São Paulo’s ethnic diversity is huge, with reasonably large Jewish, Japanese, Italian and Arab populations, among others.

Shanghai, China | 26.3 Million

Credit: Sven Hansche/Shutterstock

The fact that Beijing wasn’t the most populous city in China was a little surprising, though we’d say Shanghai would have been our second guess for “largest Chinese city.” Shanghai’s a great place to experience the convergence of old and new Chinese culture and certainly has enough going on that you won’t be bored. Lost maybe, but not bored.

Delhi, India | 29.4 Million

Credit: hadynyah/iStock

Delhi is expanding so much that it’s approaching the next step in the development of cities, where the word city may not even apply anymore. Megacity gets closer, but we’re almost thinking that a modernized form of city-state might be more appropriate. City will work for now, but we imagine there’s going to be an etymologically significant conversation happening in the Indian government soon.

Tokyo, Japan | 37.4 Million

Credit: yongyuan/iStock

Tokyo was the only city that could possibly be expected to top this list, even if you didn’t know the exact population. It’s huge and full of people, two things that seem like simple statements until you actually put them in context. It’s constantly brought up in conversations about population density, city planning and the psychology of living in a huge modern city and is the place to watch if humanity’s going to understand its urban future.

The Oldest Continually Inhabited Cities on Each Continent

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

The Oldest Continually Inhabited Cities on Each Continent

On every continent we find some of the oldest cities that early human civilizations called home. Successful long-term dwelling habitation occurs from a blending of sources. The region needs a strong economy with quality and consistency in the creation of trade. A perpetual food and water supply, availability of work, enduring infrastructure and uninterrupted peace and harmony are classic explanations.

Maintenance of the ratio of birth and death rates, as well as immigration and migration, must balance the population. All these society-friendly conditions continue to come together in some of the oldest cities on the continents of North America, South America, the Middle East, Africa and Europe.

North America: Cholula, Mexico

Credit: Orbon Alija / iStock

In North America, the pre-Columbian city of Cholula is found in the state of Puebla, Central Mexico. It is the oldest continuously inhabited city in North America, expanding from a settlement to a village and is now a regional city. The available data regarding the establishment of first-time inhabitants are conflicting, ranging from anywhere from 2000 B.C., between 800 B.C. and 200 B.C., and from the 7th century. The current thinking is that Toltec refugees settled in the area following the fall of Tula. However, other information indicates that the peoples were the children of one of the seven Aztec tribes.

Eighteen neighborhoods make up the city, and each one has a leader. This city is well known for the Iglesias de Nuestra Señora de los Remedios sanctuary. The local economy continues to endure, thanks to visitors from all over the world.

South America: Quito, Ecuador

Credit: Andrew Linscott / iStock

In South America, the oldest inhabited city is Quito in Ecuador. Located at the Guayllabamba river basin, it is the capital of Ecuador. Sources cite varying dates for first-time inhabitants, stretching from the occupation of the Kingdom of Quito from 2000 B.C. to 980 A.D., or the 13th or 16th century.

Despite earthquakes, there is enough water for residential and industrial use that the city’s population continues to replenish itself. A renewing spirit of culture, economy and environmental resources has engaged the 2 million residents and their government. Rebuilding and renovation projects have included a new airport, the Mariscal Sucre International Airport, an ecologically sustainable Metrobus-Ecovia that links the northern and southern edges of the city and a new subway system.

Middle East: Jericho, West Bank

Credit: GA161076 / iStock

Based on archeological support, it is suggested that Jericho is among the oldest inhabited cities in the world. Destroyed, abandoned, re-inhabited and enlarged many times, the city dates back to 11,000 to 9000 B.C. with the walled defenses around 6800 B.C. Researchers have uncovered 20 successive communities.

Located below sea level, Jericho has the distinction of not only being the oldest inhabited, walled city, but also geographically the lowest, located 847 feet below sea level. Local springs found near the city from the nearby Jordan River are a welcome water supply to the nearly 20,000 current residents. Considered the oasis of the Jordan Valley, tourists make a pilgrimage to soak in the unique history of this biblical-era city.

Africa: Luxor (Thebes), Egypt

Credit: cinoby / iStock

The oldest continuously inhabited city in Africa, Luxor is home to about 500,000 residents and situated near the Nile River. Estimates place the time of habitation as 7200 B.C. to 3200 B.C. Luxor was established as a sacred religious capital, yet saw decline during the Roman occupation.

Today, visitors travel the globe to explore this ancient Egyptian city. Ruins and classical artifacts abound within the monuments of the Valley of the Kings, the Valley of the Queens, the West Bank Necropolis, and the ruins of the temples of Karnak and Luxor. Supported by the tourist economy, Luxor continues to contribute to antiquity art, culture and knowledge.

Europe: Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Credit: NeonJellyfish / iStock

Assessments place the establishment of Plovdiv at 6,000 years ago. Rich in history, the city was a travel crossroads for the Roman Empire, connecting Western Europe and the Middle East. The survival of thousands of years of conflicts and occupations have left behind a vibrant cultural tapestry. Architectural landmarks, monuments, statues, art and education unite with the Thracian, Greek, Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman times. Ethnic diversity is still seen today, as Plovdiv, the second-largest city in Bulgaria, is home to 340,000 inhabitants of Roman, Armenian, Greek, Jewish, and Turkish heritage.

The world’s oldest cities evoke thoughts of faraway places and classical times. Archeological discoveries link us to our common ancestry, and there are many histories yet to be revealed. From the seven hills of Rome to the Americas, communities are the cornerstone of humanity.

8 Creepiest Places on the Planet

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

8

Creepiest Places on the Planet

There is no shortage of downright spooky spots to visit. You could easily spend years traveling to some of the most haunted and bone-chilling sites around the world. To get you started, here are eight of the creepiest places on the planet.

Winchester Mystery House

Winchester Mystery House

Credit: Uladzik Kryhin/Shutterstock

If you’re in San Jose, California, you can visit the Winchester Mystery House, one of the strangest buildings you’ll ever enter. When Sarah Winchester lost her husband and child, a psychic told her that the family was haunted by spirits from all those who were killed by Winchester guns. To appease the spirits, she needed to build a home according to the spirits’ requests, and as long as construction continued, she would be left alive. The home now has 160 rooms, 10,000 windows, 2,000 doors, six kitchens, 47 fireplaces and 47 staircases.

Dargavs

Dargavs

Credit: StasEtvesh/Shutterstock

The village of Dargavs in Russia looks like a quaint hillside establishment at first glance. However, it’s actually the City of the Dead, where people buried their loved ones along with their personal belongings and clothes. There are many legends surrounding the place, including one suggesting that locals would not go here, because they believed they would not come out alive.

Sedlec Ossuary

Sedlec Ossuary

Credit: Aleksandr Vrubleviskiy/Shutterstock

From the outside, this Roman Catholic Church in the Czech Republic appears perfectly normal, but once you step inside, that all changes. The chapel is quite unique, considering that its décor is comprised of human bones from an estimated 40,000 bodies. And don’t miss the chandelier at Sedlec Ossuary, which is said to contain at least one of every bone found in the human body.

Door to Hell

Door to Hell

Credit: Iwanami Photos/Shutterstock

The Darvaza gas crater in Turkmenistan is more commonly known as the “Door to Hell.” It’s a massive, 230-foot-wide crater that was created when scientists drilling for natural gas had their rig collapse. They set it on fire out of concern for spreading poisonous methane gas. That was in 1971 and the crater still burns today.

Pripyat

Pripyat

Credit: Pe3k/Shutterstock

Pripyat is the abandoned town near Chernobyl that was quickly evacuated after the explosion in 1986. It’s still too radioactive to be habitable as a functioning city and remains a snapshot of life in the Soviet Union during the 80s.

Paris Catacombs

Paris Catacombs

Credit: Wyatt Rivard/Shutterstock

In the 17th and 18th centuries, Paris’ cemeteries were so full that corpses had become uncovered and the ground was caving in at certain spots. The solution was to place bodies in limestone tunnels that existed for centuries below the city. The burials have since ended, but there are around six million bodies buried in the Paris catacombs.

Hoia Baciu Forest

Hoia Baciu Forest

Credit: Daniel Marian/Shutterstock

The Hoia Baciu Forest is often called the Bermuda Triangle of Romania and is said to be the world’s most haunted forest thanks to its reputation for paranormal activity and other unexplained happenings. Some of these include unexplained disappearances, faces appearing in photographs that were not seen with the naked eye, ghost sightings and even UFO sightings in the 70s. If this isn’t all creepy enough, the vegetation takes on a bizarre appearance here, and visitors report strong feelings of anxiety when visiting.

Island of the Dolls

Island of the Dolls

Credit: avf71/Shutterstock

The iconic canals of Xochimilco near Mexico City are stunning, but you’ll also find there is a dark side, at least on one of the artificial islands. Legend has it that caretaker Don Julian Santana Barrera witnessed a little girl drowning in the canal but was unable to save her. Her doll floated up to the island and he hung it in the trees to pay respects. Some say dolls kept washing ashore, and he continued to hang them as a vigil until he was found dead years later in the same spot where she died.

John Eli

Virtual Mindset Coach, Life Strategist, Author, Speaker

Soulja 4 Christ

Kingdom Minded

Karen Hughes Embury

Faith, Family, and Adventure

Making Jesus Famous- 2019!

To fall in love with God is the greatest romance; to seek Him, the greatest adventure; to find Him, the greatest human achievement. -St.Augustine of Hippo

efebos

Sólo una opinión de lo que habita con el tiempo.

Being Outside Cricket

The Home of Bilious Inadequates, Vile Ignoramuses and Social Media Zealots

Advicebyher

We are here to inform and inspire.

%d bloggers like this: