Kentucky Is 3rd Worse State About Cutting Education Spending

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE LEXINGTON HERALD LEADER)

((oped) REPUBLICANS CONTROL EVERYTHING  WITHIN THE THREE WORSE STATES AS FAR AS FUNDING EDUCATION, OKLAHOMA, TEXAS, KENTUCKY: FOLKS, DO YOU SEE THE REALITY HERE?) (trs)

Kentucky one of the worst states for cuts to education spending, report shows

NOVEMBER 29, 2017 09:36 AM

UPDATED 6 HOURS 1 MINUTES AGO

Where do the drugs go? No law for Ky coroners leaves concern

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF WKYT TV IN LEXINGTON KENTUCKY)

 

Where do the drugs go? No law for Ky coroners leaves concern
     

RICHMOND, Ky. (WKYT) – What are coroners expected to do with legal drugs after investigating a death? Even county coroners don’t know.

There is a Kentucky law that says coroners are entitled to take in their possession any evidence or anything or anything they believe contributes to cause and manner of death, which would include medications and narcotics. However, after a coroner’s investigation is complete, there’s no law saying how a coroner is supposed to dispose of the drugs.

“There could be issues. Absolutely there could be issues. You have the availability without question,” explained Madison County Coroner Jimmy Cornelison. Cornelison told WKYT’s Miranda Combs that a lot of people don’t realize that when it comes to a death investigation the coroner is the highest law enforcement authority at the scene. “So we can take anything and everything we want to take. We don’t have to have maybe a search warrant that police have to have because we’re doing a death investigation. It’s different,” he explained.

“It’s just come to our attention that the coroner now has possession of these narcotics,” explained Henry County Coroner and Kentucky Coroner’s Association Legislative Liaison James Pollard. “We’ve got 120 coroners, so we have to come up with a plan that’s not only going to dispose of these narcotics, but it’s also going to protect the coroner.” He said coroners also take narcotics at the request of the family, or in some cases, because the coroner knows the family or friends will take the drugs.

Pollard went on, “We feel like what we need to do now is get a piece of legislation put together.”

Combs asked, “Are we opening a can of worms with this?”

Pollard replied, “It may be a good can of worms to open up. And that way, let’s get everybody covered, protect everybody.”

Pollard and other coroners have started writing a draft of a law to require coroners to follow the same protocol to dispose of medications and narcotics.

Cornelison already has a protocol for his office. After the medications are counted and logged, the labels are torn off the bottles and they are taken straight to a DEA drop box. There are 178 boxes in Kentucky, in almost every county. “I’m not sitting here saying that people are doing things wrong, but if you don’t know if you’re doing them wrong, or if there’s a better way to do it, we don’t know what it is right now.”

What Is The Actual Value Of The Land People Are Spilling Their Blood Over?

 

Sometimes on our evening news we see scenes of places where wars are going on in the ‘Islamic world’. Whether the landscaping be from Libya, Syria, Iraq, or Afghanistan, folks these people are fighting over and losing their lives over what is nothing but rubble. Folks before George W. Bush ran us into Iraq so he could show his daddy ‘how it’s done’, these battle scenes we have been seeing on the evening news were the cities that are now rubble, some had hundreds of thousands, some millions of residents. In the places where buildings are still standing they are so mauled they would need to be torn down even if a total peace started right now. What I am getting at here is a financial question. Think about it for a moment, if Cities like Knoxville Tennessee, Lexington Kentucky, and Spearfish South Dakota were standing in total rubble what would be the cost of the rubble being hauled to a huge land dump/buried and then having the land scraped clean? Then of course there is the cost of reconstruction. Just in the cities that I just mentioned the cost would probably be several hundred billion dollars. What do you think the rebuild cost will be to remake a whole country like Syria from the ground up? If the Syrian President told ISIS that they could have the City (the ruins) of Aleppo, what would they have gained? They would have a lot of stone, a lot of rock, and a whole lot of dry un-baron dirt. No economy, no infrastructure, no housing, no people, total brain-drain, no food, no transportation system, what piece of dirt over there is worth anyone’s bloodshed? Should the world maybe realize that there is more behind these wars than just wanting the dirt? Could the real issue be the raw hatred of each other (Shiite – Sunni)? If this is the case (and it is) then it makes no sense for ‘the West’ to spill any of our blood over there because this is a fight that will only end when one has killed-off the other, no matter how much of our blood we give to each of them because they both hate our guts. Should the whole world pull a Donald Trump and maybe put a wall up around all of the Middle-East, deport all people whom believe in Islam and make them stay there and fight it out until only one or the other exist? Thing is the world would still have to keep the winner walled in because you know that the winners would unleash all their hate on you as soon as they get back into your country.