Louisiana Democrat, Gov. John Bel Edwards, Keeps Seat Despite Trump’s Opposition

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NPR NEWS)

 

Louisiana Democrat, Gov. John Bel Edwards, Keeps Seat Despite Trump’s Opposition

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards talks to media in Shreveport, La., Thursday. Saturday, Edwards, a Democrat, beat out Republican Eddie Rispone, who President Trump endorsed.

Gerald Herbert/AP

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards, a Democrat, held on to his seat Saturday after a tough challenge from his Republican opponent, Eddie Rispone, a wealthy businessman and political newcomer who President Trump supported.

Edwards is the only Democratic governor in the Deep South and is not a typical Democrat. He’s a pro-Second Amendment gun owner who signed one of the country’s strictest anti-abortion bills this year.

This is the third and final gubernatorial election of 2019 and the second loss for President Trump who campaigned for all three candidates. The president was in Louisiana this week and framed the race as a personal referendum, urging voters to unseat Edwards.

About two weeks ago, Republican Tate Reeves won the open seat in Mississippi, but in Kentucky, Democrat Andy Beshear ousted Republican incumbent Gov. Matt Bevin.

Edwards’ second term may be a bitter pill for Trump who had much invested in this year’s elections ahead of his own election in 2020.

Republican Matt Bevin concedes defeat in Kentucky governor’s race

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

Republican Matt Bevin concedes defeat in Kentucky governor’s race

(CNN)Kentucky Republican Gov. Matt Bevin conceded defeat on Thursday to Democratic state Attorney General Andy Beshear.

“We’re going to have a change in the governorship based on the vote of the people,” Bevin said at a news conference.
The concession comes after Bevin requested all 120 counties in the state recheck the results from last week’s gubernatorial election. That re-canvass showed Beshear still leading over Bevin.
Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes said in a statement that Beshear received 5,136 more votes than Bevin.
“I’m not going to contest these numbers that have come in,” Bevin said Thursday.
“I truly wish the attorney general well as the next governor of this state as he assumes these responsibilities,” Bevin said. Bevin said his team has already been working with Beshear’s and that he expects a smooth transition.
“I love the fact that we’re blessed to live in a nation where things do transition in ways that much of the world wishes they had,” he said.
Beshear said at a news conference he appreciated Bevin’s concession, which he noted came quickly after the re-canvass.
“The race is now officially over,” Beshear said, “which means we can look forward and we can move forward.”
Beshear was elected attorney general of Kentucky in 2015 and is the son of Steve Beshear, Bevin’s predecessor.
The governor-elect tweeted: “It’s official – thank you Kentucky. @GovMattBevin and his team have already begun a smooth transition. It’s time to get to work!”
A Democratic victory in Kentucky, a state Donald Trump carried by 30 percentage points in the 2016 election, could be seen as an ominous sign for the President heading into his 2020 reelection bid. The result shows that Trump wasn’t able to carry his preferred candidate over the finish line. Bevin had the strong backing of the President, and Trump held a rally in Lexington, Kentucky, the night before the election.
Bevin, elected governor in 2015, has faced backlash for seeking to undercut the state’s Medicaid expansion and calling teachers “selfish” and accusing them of a “thug mentality” when they protested after he threatened to cut their pensions.
Bevin requested a re-canvass after the results from last week’s election showed Bevin trailing Beshear by more than 5,000 votes.
The re-canvass began on Thursday morning. Unlike a standard recount of votes, a re-canvass is a reprint of the receipts from voting machines to check for reporting or clerical errors. After ballots are scanned, the machine tabulates those votes and prints out a receipt with the total.
During the re-canvass, those receipts were reprinted and checked again to make sure they were reported properly. It’s not uncommon for some clerical errors to occur during the initial vote tabulation.
Kentucky law does not allow for a recount in a gubernatorial general election, but a campaign may request a re-canvass of the votes with the secretary of state. There is no threshold or margin requirement for a re-canvass.
Bevin previously told CNN affiliate WKYT: “It’s not likely to change a lot numerically, but you have to go through this as a first step … to make sure the numbers that were written down and communicated are accurate.” He said his office is also preparing for Beshear to assume the governorship.
“There are very good odds, he could be the next governor — no question about it,” Bevin told WKYT. “Right now, he is numerically ahead and would seemingly be the next governor, and if that is corroborated and held up through this process, I’ll be his number one cheerleader.”
Representatives from both political parties and the media were allowed to be present for the re-canvass.

KENTUCKY GOV. MATT BEVIN ACCUSES SECRETARY OF STATE OF FRAUD AFTER SHE DECLARES HE LOST THE ELECTION

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NEWSWEEK)

 

KENTUCKY GOV. MATT BEVIN ACCUSES SECRETARY OF STATE OF FRAUD AFTER SHE DECLARES HE LOST THE ELECTION

Kentucky Governor Matt Bevin has accused Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes of fraud for announcing the results of the election live on CNN, and continues to refuse to concede a race that he lost by less than half of a percentage point, says The Hill.

Tuesday night, Bevin lost to Democrat Andy Beshear in a hotly contested race, which was enough to cause him to declare he wouldn’t concede the race, then called for a re-canvassing of voters.

“Kentucky sadly—and it’s not unique to Kentucky—but there’s more than a little bit of history of vote fraud in our state,” Bevin told reporters, adding that his campaign was working on “getting affidavits and other information that will help us to get a better understanding of what did or did not happen.”

He added that there were reports of Kentucky voters being “incorrectly turned away from various voting booths around the state.”

Bevin also accused Alison Lundergan Grimes, the Secretary of State, of committing fraud by announcing the election results live on CNN, mentioning that she is currently the subject of a special state prosecutor’s investigation for allegedly misusing voter records.

“The fact that our secretary of state was on national TV … it was an interesting choice of places for her to go while the roll was being tallied, the votes were being tallied and to call an election,” he said.

“For her to try to jump the gun on this and interject herself into this, it’s something that’s being looked into,” he continued.

Matt Bevin
Accusing the Secretary of State of fraud for announcing election results on CNN, Matt Bevin held firm on his accusation that voter irregularities were the reason for his loss on Tuesday night .JOHN SOMMERS II/GETTY

“This is from a woman, with all due respect to her, is not exactly rock solid as it comes to following the letter of the law,” he said.

“She’s currently under investigation for misuse of voter files herself. Her father has already been convicted of multiple—I think 10—different federal charges related to election fraud specific to her race,” he added.

Grimes is at the center of two legal cases, according to the Lexington Herald-Leader. In one case, Jared Dearing, executive director of the State Board of Elections, has alleged that Grimes’ office illegally obtained the state’s voter registration database and did illegal searches of it.

In the other, Grimes filed a suit alleging that a new law stripped her office of its power over the State Board of Elections. She claims the law made it a misdemeanor for her office to search the database.

Her father, Jerry Lundergan, served as a Democrat in the Kentucky House of Representatives and the chairman of the Kentucky Democratic Party. In 1989, he was convicted of a felony charge of improperly using his influence, however, that conviction was later thrown out by an appeals court. Last year, he was indicted for making illegal campaign contributions to his daughter during her 2014 race to unseat Sen. Mitch McConnell.

The recanvassing work will be done by November 14, said a board of elections member. The Kentucky State Board of Elections will meet on November 21 to certify the election results.

Bevin’s opponent, Andy Beshear, has 49.2 percent (711,955 votes) to 48.9 percent for Bevin. A Libertarian candidate, John Hicks, received 28,475 votes, or 2.0 percent of the vote. Beshear’s margin of victory ultimately totaled 5,200 votes.

At a news conference held on Wednesday, Beshear said that he hadn’t spoken to Bevin about the recount but that he felt it was “time to move on” from the election, according to CBS News.

Tuesday’s Elections Show Impeachment Might Not Boost GOP As Much As It Hoped

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NPR NEWS)

 

Tuesday’s Elections Show Impeachment Might Not Boost GOP As Much As It Hoped

President Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Lexington, Ky., Monday. His efforts don’t appear to have been enough to carry incumbent GOP Gov. Matt Bevin over the finish line.

Susan Walsh/AP

Tuesday’s statewide elections in Kentucky and Virginia were a big night for Democrats. And the results tell us a few things about national politics, consequential issues and President Trump.

In Kentucky, Democrat Andy Beshear, the son of former Gov. Steve Beshear, claimed victory Tuesday night and narrowly leads incumbent Gov. Matt Bevin by about 5,000 votes. Bevin has not yet conceded the race.

In Virginia, Democrats took over both chambers of the state legislature and now have full control of the state’s political apparatus, a sweeping change from a decade ago when Virginia was considered the nation’s bellwether.

Republicans kept hold of the governorship in Mississippi, but the margin — 5 percentage points — was far smaller than Trump’s 18 points in 2016.

Here are seven lessons from Tuesday night’s results:

1. Impeachment did not help Republicans fire up conservatives in rural areas

Republicans have been saying that impeachment would backfire on Democrats and enthuse Trump’s rural base. But that didn’t pan out Tuesday in Kentucky and Virginia. Democratic voters in urban areas, on the other hand, are clearly fired up.

They showed up, especially in Kentucky, in higher-than-usual numbers, while voters in rural areas didn’t. Trump, who only won 46% of the national popular vote in 2016, needs every last one of the people who voted for him then to come out again, especially as he has done almost nothing to try to win over persuadable voters this time around. Kentucky and Virginia could be warning signs that impeachment, even though the Trump campaign has raised lots of money off it, simply isn’t the issue Republicans hoped it would be with voters.

2. Trump won’t like this

“You can’t let that happen to me!” Trump said at his Kentucky rally Monday night, imploring Kentucky voters to go to the polls for Bevin. He did not want the the narrative to be: “Trump suffered the greatest defeat in the history of the world.”

Well, it wasn’t the greatest defeat in the history of the world. But it is bad news for Trump, despite his campaign dismissing the loss as the result of problems with Bevin’s campaign. So what will the results mean for his mood and state of mind, as congressional investigators keep asking questions in their impeachment inquiry?

3. The suburbs remain a warning sign for Republicans

Republicans want to dismiss the results in Kentucky as Bevin being unpopular and acerbic, and that is a point to consider, especially considering that Republican candidates swept all of the other statewide races, mostly by double-digit margins. But Bevin’s unpopularity does not explain the results in Virginia.

The fact is what we’ve seen in election after election since Trump has been in office is Democrats outperforming prior performances — and that strength has been rooted in the suburbs. Remember, Republicans lost the House in 2018 because suburban voters turned on Trump and the GOP — and Republicans haven’t fixed that problem.

4. Governing still matters

Kentucky is a state Trump won by 30 points. So this should have been a layup for any generic Republican candidate. But Bevin is no generic Republican. He picked fights with all kinds of constituencies in the state.

We’ve seen it time and again — take Kansas, for example — that when a governor governs ideologically, they wind up in political trouble. And the opposite is true, too. The three most popular governors in the country are Republicans in liberal states: Charlie Baker in Massachusetts, Larry Hogan in Maryland and Phil Scott in Vermont. That should be a lesson that the GOP pays attention to.

5. Kentucky likely does not mean much for Mitch McConnell’s and Trump’s chances in the state in 2020

Sure, Bevin was unpopular, and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is unpopular in his home state, too. And, yes, Trump was not quite able to drag Bevin across the finish line Tuesday night.

But that does not mean either Trump or McConnell is in trouble in Kentucky next year. Over the past decade, McConnell has often been among the least popular senators with his constituents and yet has comfortably won reelection each time. He and Bevin have different brands in the state, and a McConnell protégé won handily for attorney general.

What’s more, having Trump on the ballot will help McConnell. It’s important to remember that while turnout was up substantially from the last governor’s race in 2015, it was still down about 35% from the presidential election. Expect those numbers to shoot back up in 2020.

6. Virginia is now officially a blue state

My, how times change and can change quickly. The results Tuesday night in Virginia mean Democrats in the state now control the legislature and every statewide elected office — governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general.

Virginia has outpaced the rest of the country, is no longer a swing state and is moving to being reliably Democratic. And that shift came in a year when the top trio of elected Democrats in the state faced a variety of scandals that hobbled their ability to campaign for down-ballot candidates.

7. The politics of health care and guns may be moving left

Before Bevin came into office, Kentucky had one of the best-run Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare) exchanges in the country. It also expanded Medicaid under Gov. Steve Beshear, a Democrat.

Bevin took a very different approach. He tried to institute work requirements for Medicaid, which would have resulted in tens of thousands of Kentuckians losing health insurance. That was hotly divisive, and his loss Tuesday proves that once you give people the benefit, it is very difficult to take it away.

That has long been the argument Democrats have made in favor of the Affordable Care Act even when it was unpopular. And guess what? As predicted, it has grown more popular, and without an alternative, Republicans have struggled to figure out what to do about it.

In Virginia, guns were a top issue after a raft of mass shootings nationally and in the state. Gun-control groups outspent the National Rifle Association by about $500,000, and Tuesday’s Virginia results showed that with a concerted effort, lots of money and focused activism, the tide could be turning on gun policy.

(Poem) My Old Kentucky Run

My Old Kentucky Run

 

Early this morning in these old Kentucky hills

I did leave my cabin in search of a meal

Looking for a squirrel, rabbit, or pheasant my belly to fill

Three extra shells for my 20 gauge strapped to my side

I popped up over a hill and to my surprise

Eye ball to belly with a bear twice my size

 

 

Off and a running with nowhere to hide

Tooth pick legs a pumping, corn liquor belly swaying side to side

Huffing and puffing, I just can’t out run this four-legged fiend

Lord I know this prayer is quite a bit to late

But Lord please give me faster feet or a much bigger gun

With fangs in my backside, and no shine to kill the pain

Now sauteed and seasoned on this bad boys plate

Only hope now is that Heaven is the place I awake

 

 

 

(Humor/Poem) A Cat Named Puppy

A CAT NAMED PUPPY

 

This is the story of our family’s furry little friend

A little fur ball from the pound she purred her way in

A little tabby as sweet and loving as she could possibly be

Yet a little deranged as in this story you shall soon see

 

 

We had no intention of getting this plain little girl

But with her unending rubbing and purring

We brought her and a rotund sister into our world

Her name was Starlight but to this she had not a clue

 

 

One day my wife’s dad stopped in with his puppy named Bandit

This furry little boy Shih Tzu who set the Kitty’s heart all a glow

It is good that they were both already surgically fixed

The cartoon called Cat Dog now did not seem so far fetched

 

 

The day came when Bandit went back to his home in KY

Starlight was heart broken and somewhere she did hide

While sitting on the couch my wife thought of a plan

She panted like Bandit and to her the cat ran

 

 

This is not all of her strangeness you see

Wherever my wife goes the cat follow’s her feet

Her name is no longer Starlight for that she still does not know

But just say the name Puppy and in your lap she will be

Matt Bevin no longer most unpopular governor in America

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF WKYT TV LEXINGTON KY)

 

Matt Bevin no longer most unpopular governor in America in latest survey

Gov. Matt Bevin proposes a veteran tax benefit plan in a campaign stop. (WAVE)
By WKYT News Staff |
 
    

FRANKFORT, Ky. (WKYT) – Matt Bevin is no longer the country’s most unpopular governor in a newly released survey.

Morning Consult’s Governor Approval Rankings now show the Kentucky governor is the second-most unpopular governor behind Rhode Island Democrat Gina Raimondo.

Bevin’s unpopularity dropped from 56 percent to 53 percent in Morning Consult’s 2019 Q3 survey. His approval increased from 32 percent to 34 percent, which still remains the lowest approval rating in the country. He remains the most unpopular Republican governor, and he is the only Republican governor who has at least a 50 percent unpopular rating. 13 percent of people surveyed said they don’t know.

Massachusetts Republican Charlie Baker is the most popular governor with a 73 percent approval rating. The top 14 governors in the survey in popularity are all Republicans.

Bevin’s numbers were at their lowest in the 2018 Q2 survey, when he had a 29 percent approval rating, while 57 percent disapproved.

Kentucky’s gubernatorial election is Nov. 5. Bevin will face Democratic Attorney General Andy Beshear.

(Poem) Rain Drops Again, Evil Or Friend (#2)

Rain Drops Again, Evil Or Friend

 

Here in eastern Kentucky it has been quite wet

TV says in the north-east the water is running high

So hot and dry in Florida matchsticks run and hide

Jet-stream to low there yet here its way to high

 

Farmers look for spring moisture to bring the Earth alive

To much spring rain or a late freeze all their seeds will die

We all gotta have some water but not ever this damn high

Earth’s having it’s 10,000 year itch for us its quite a bitch

 

As the Earth’s Polar ends move turns out we must do so too

The Sahara is now the land of wheat, corn, soybeans and carrots

Now days in Nebraska and Kansas the sand dunes go for on for miles

Waking up to rain drops again was it a dream or beginning of the end

 

3 States With Very Restrictive Gun Laws With Three Mass Shootings This Weekend

3 States With Very Restrictive Gun Laws With Three Mass Shootings This Weekend

 

This letter to you this evening is one filled with my opinions on guns and gun laws here in the U.S. as well as some facts for you to consider. New York, Illinois and California are three of the most restrictive gun law States in our Nation. Since Friday evening through Sunday night there were three mass shooting that I am aware of. First, Friday evening at a block party in Brooklyn NY some coward opened fire on the crowd killing at least three and wounding eleven. Sunday evening in the city of Gilroy in north central California another coward, or two, did the same at their annual festival, again killing at least three and wounding eleven. Over the weekend in Chicago the police there say that from 5 PM Friday through Sunday evening 40 more people were shot with at least 8 being killed. One thing that these three States have in common is that they are three of the most restrictive gun law States in our Nation.

 

What I mean by ‘restrictive’ is simple, it means that the laws in those States make it very difficult to buy and possess a firearm legally and to carry one on you, almost impossible. But, as all the world knows that in most cases it is not a person who bought a legal firearm that tends to go around shooting people. Don’t get me wrong, I am for several restrictions being in place to stop really bad people from buying guns. Restrictions like 5-7 day waiting periods to possess a firearm that is bought from a store. Federal background checks are a very good thing and I believe that people who are obviously a looney tune should never be able to get a firearm. I believe that ‘gun shows’ should have major curbs on them such as no firearms being allowed to be bought in the parking lots outside of the buildings and the same 5-7 day waiting periods with background checks for weapons being bought inside the shows.

 

Think about the situation just across our southern border in Mexico, they have very tough gun laws there which makes the law abiding citizens nothing but fodder for the drug gangs, the people aren’t allowed to defend themselves and the bad folks know it. I live in the State of Kentucky which has extremely lenient gun laws, probably about the most lenient ones in the whole Country. I have a concealed license as does every member of my family, we had them even before our ignorant governor made it legal for anyone and everyone to carry concealed shortly before the spring elections. This means that you don’t have to have any training at all to carry a hideaway gun on you, a very stupid idea. But there is one issue I would like you to think about concerning gun law reality here in Kentucky compared to Illinois, New York or California. Here in Kentucky if an idiot pulls out a firearm in a store there is a very very good chance that patrons within the store are going to shoot that person dead on the spot. If in a case like what happened in Brooklyn or in Gilroy happened here where a coward opens fire on a crowd many of the people in that crowd will have guns on them and they will without a doubt kill that shooter or shooters on the spot, thus limiting the body count of the murderous cowards. Please notice one thing about these shooters, the reason I call them cowards, they always commit their crimes where they are pretty positive no one will be shooting back at them. States with these highly restrictive gun laws only end up getting their innocent law abiding citizens murdered.  What I am trying to do in this letter to you this evening is to point out realities. After every mass shooting the ‘progressive left’ starts using the deaths as an excuse to disarm the law abiding civilians. One of the most gut wrenching realities is when a total coward goes into a school and kills a bunch of kids or into a place of worship and kill all the unarmed people. Cowards always choose the easiest unarmed targets, don’t be one. Don’t let the far left politicians or anyone else get you and your family murdered by one of these cowards. If you notice, the ones who do the most screaming about disarming you are the ones who have the protection of people with guns all around them, think about it.

3 Places To Stop Along the Mississippi River

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

3 Places To Stop Along the Mississippi River

The Mississippi River runs through 10 different states, and it was a huge asset to both the Native Americans and the settlers that came after them. What some people might not know, though, is that there are dozens of interesting places to stop along the Mississippi to take in the history and culture of the area. Here are three of the best.

Delta Blues Museum – Clarksdale, Mississippi

Credit: James Kirkikis/Shutterstock

Founded in 1979, the Delta Blues Museum is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year and is expected to see many more. This museum celebrates the significant moments and important artists in the blues genre with pieces like the Muddy Waters Guitar, which was crafted from a piece of wood taken from the cabin of blues superstar Muddy Waters and used to make a guitar that has been used on stage by ZZ Top. It also has educational exhibits, such as “The Blues and the Great Migration,” which teaches visitors how the blues evolved during a time when many people from the South were spreading out into the other states in America. If you come on the right day, you can even take in a live blues show.

National Mississippi River Museum and Aquarium – Dubuque, Mississippi

Credit: Dirk Hanson/Wikimediacommons

There are no sharks or stingrays in the Mississippi River, but you can see both of these fish and more at the National Mississippi River Museum and Aquarium in Dubuque, Mississippi. The aquarium is home to many sea animals you wouldn’t see in this river, but they are there to help bring awareness to the conservation of all aquatic and animal life. In addition to sea turtles, otters, giant octopi, Alligator Snapping Turtles and alligators, you can also see a number of feathered friends that are native to the area, like Bald Eagles, Bufflehead Ducks and Red-tailed Hawks. In the museum portion of the structure, you can visit a blacksmith shop and cave exhibits and see historical artifacts from the people who have lived near the Mississippi River for the last thousand years.

Wickliffe Mounds State Historic Site – Wickliffe, Kentucky

Credit: Chris Light/Wikimediacommons

While the other two places on this list celebrate the history of the area around the Mississippi River, the Wickliffe Mounds are this history. The mounds at this state historic site were built between 1110 and 1350 A.D. by a Mississippian Native American tribe. They were used as a more permanent type of housing than the teepees or straw huts used by other tribes, meaning that these people were here to stay. On this site, there are walking trails that take you through the surrounding wooded area where you can see the same types of wildlife as the native people did, as well as a museum that displays many of the artifacts that have been excavated by archaeologists in this area. And if that wasn’t enough to convince you, you just can’t beat the view from the top of the Ceremonial Mound, the largest mound in the park, that lets you look out over the vast expanse of nature all around you.

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