Senator Harris And The “Race Card” Issue

Senator Harris And The “Race Card” Issue

 

The Lord knows very well that I have no use for the Trump family as the feces rolls downhill from the Donald on through his adult children and that does include Don Junior. I know that Senior has had issues with birth certificates before with Mr. Obama and now it seems there is a tiff between Don Jr and the media concerning himself and Senator Harris of California. So, now I am going to simply give my unbiased opinion on the re-tweet that Don Jr posted about the Senator. Personally, ever since I first heard of Ms. Harris up until the past 24 hours I had always thought that she was a Black lady as in my opinion that is what she has always portrayed when I have heard her talk or when I have read articles by/about her. But, it turns out that I was wrong and it appears that Don Jr was correct on this issue concerning her. In everything I have ever heard come out of her lips she has come across as a very racist Black lady too me. In the past 24 hours I have found out that she isn’t a Black person at all, even though she has always talked as though she is, I guess it was for the purpose of getting the “Black vote” there in California. The truth I have found out today is that her Dad is Jamaican and her Mom is from India so, there is no “American Black” persons blood in her. I am just making a statement in this letter to you today. I am not sure by which item I am the most shocked by, is it that this Black lady is not Black at all, or that Don Jr may have actually spoken the truth on something. Lord knows he didn’t get that from his Daddy, hell, Senior may disown him for saying something truthful, ya never know, I’m just saying…..

3 Countries You (Probably) Didn’t Know Used to Be British Colonies

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

3 Countries You Didn’t Know Used to Be British Colonies

At the height of the British Empire, the United Kingdom ruled over 412 million people, 23 percent of the total human population of Earth. It was the largest empire in history, throughout which territories were divided into dominions, colonies, and protectorates. Based on the sheer size of the empire, it’s more of a challenge to find a corner of the world in which the British didn’t own some piece at one point or another. However, there are still a handful of nations that you may be surprised to learn were once colonies of the British Empire.

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Jamaica

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Although the official language is a bit of a giveaway, the history of Jamaica is less-than-straightforward. The islands were first inhabited by the Arawak and Taíno indigenous peoples of South America before their discovery by Columbus. It was from the Taíno word for the island, “Xaymaca,” that “Jamaica” was derived. Starting in 1509, the Spanish began their colonization of the island, which ended with the massacre and enslavement of the natives before the establishment of the New Seville Settlement and eventually the Island of Santiago.

Indigenous populations dwindled up until the Spanish began importing African slaves for labor, though the island served primarily as a military outpost. Between 1654 and 1657, British and Spanish forces fought throughout the Caribbean for territory until the British seized control of Jamaica. After the fall of the Spaniards, freed slaves lived in the mountains with Taíno while the British established sugar cane plantations. A complex history between free men, slave uprisings, and political turmoil eventually led to the independence of Jamaica in 1962.

Guyana

Credit: benedek / iStock

Guyana of South America follows a similar story to its Caribbean neighbors to the north with added complexity. Originally inhabited by a wide variety of indigenous tribes comprising nine different ethnic groups, Guyana was first visited by Christopher Columbus during his early expeditions. However, it was the Dutch rather than the Spanish who first established settlements in Guyana. Dutch ownership was formally recognized by the Spanish in 1648.

Indigenous populations and imported African slaves were put to work on plantations until uprisings from brutal work conditions started in the late 1700s to the point of threatening Dutch control of the region. Struggling to maintain control of the area, the Dutch opened up trade with British territories, which led to increasing economic influence, eventually culminating in war between the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. The French occupation of The Netherlands in 1795 presented an easy opportunity for British takeover that resulted in their territorial acquisition.

Guyana’s acquisition preceded a number of political changes that would eventually lead to its independence including the abolition of the slave trade (but not slavery) in the United Kingdom and uprisings that led to the end of slavery as a whole in Guyana. The 19th century saw increased political turmoil and reform that started a gradual path to independence. However, it wouldn’t be until the end of World War II that Guyana started the path to sovereignty in earnest.

Malta

Credit: eli_asenova / iStock

Sitting just south of the Italian Peninsula, Malta has a complex history with inhabitants from ancient and modern empires. The earliest settlers on the islands trace back to the Neolithic period, proposed to have migrated from modern-day Sicily. Around 700 BC, the islands were colonized by the Phoenicians and 500 years later taken by the Roman Republic. Subsequent rulers included the Byzantines, the Aghlabids, the Normans, the Swabians, the Argonese and the Spanish.

By 1798, the French First Republic took control of the island briefly before they were expelled by its inhabitants. The British immediately declared the state as a protectorate, and though its status remained as such, it was in practice a British colony. The Maltese celebrate their sovereignty in the wake of the Malta Independence Act of 1964 on September 21, each year.

Jamaica: Truth, Knowledge, History Of The Caribbean Island Nation

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE CIA WORLD FACT BOOK)

 

Jamaica

Introduction The island – discovered by Christopher COLUMBUS in 1494 – was settled by the Spanish early in the 16th century. The native Taino Indians, who had inhabited Jamaica for centuries, were gradually exterminated and replaced by African slaves. England seized the island in 1655 and established a plantation economy based on sugar, cocoa, and coffee. The abolition of slavery in 1834 freed a quarter million slaves, many of whom became small farmers. Jamaica gradually obtained increasing independence from Britain, and in 1958 it joined other British Caribbean colonies in forming the Federation of the West Indies. Jamaica gained full independence when it withdrew from the Federation in 1962. Deteriorating economic conditions during the 1970s led to recurrent violence as rival gangs affiliated with the major political parties evolved into powerful organized crime networks involved in international drug smuggling and money laundering. Violent crime, drug trafficking, and poverty pose significant challenges to the government today. Nonetheless, many rural and resort areas remain relatively safe and contribute substantially to the economy.
History The original Arawak or possibly Taino people from South America first settled on the island between 4000 and 1000 BC. Although some claim they became virtually extinct following contact with Europeans, others claim that some survived for a while. There is very little trace of the Arawak culture, and the Jamaican National Heritage Trust is attempting to locate and document any evidence of the Arawaks.[2]

Jamaica was claimed for Spain after Christopher Columbus first landed there in 1494. The English Admiral William Penn (father of William Penn of Pennsylvania) and General Robert Venables seized the island in 1655. During its first 200 years of English (then British) rule, post Spanish rule, Jamaica became one of the world’s leading sugar exporting nations and produced over 77,000 tons of sugar annually between 1820 and 1824, which was achieved through the massive use of imported African slave labour. After the abolition of the slave trade the British imported Indian and Chinese indentured servants in the early 1800s as more cheap labour. The descendants of the Chinese and Indian indentured servants continue to reside in Jamaica today.

By the beginning of the 19th century, the United Kingdom’s heavy reliance on slavery resulted in blacks (Africans) outnumbering whites (Europeans) by a ratio of almost 20 to 1, leading to constant opportunities for revolt. Following a series of rebellions, slavery was formally abolished in 1834, with full emancipation from chattel slavery declared in 1838.

During the 1800’s a number of botanical gardens were established. These included the Castleton Garden in 1862 (set up to replace the Bath Garden which was established during the late 1770s and where breadfruit brought to Jamaica by Captain William Bligh was planted but which was subject to flooding), the Cinchona Plantation in 1868 and the Hope Garden during 1874.

In 1945, Sir Horace Hector Hearne became Chief Justice and Keeper of the Records in Jamaica and sat in the Supreme Court, Kingston between 1945 and 1950/1951 before going on to become Chief Justice in Kenya.

Jamaica slowly gained increasing independence from the United Kingdom. In 1958, it became a province in the Federation of the West Indies, a federation among all of the British West Indies. Jamaica attained full independence by leaving the federation in 1962.

Strong economic growth averaging about six percent per annum marked its first ten years of independence under conservative governments led successively by Prime Ministers Alexander Bustamante, Donald Sangster and Hugh Shearer. The growth was fueled by strong investments in bauxite/alumina, tourism, manufacturing industry and to a lesser extent the agricultural sector. However, the initial optimism of the first decade was accompanied by a growing sense of inequality and a sense that the benefits of growth were not being experienced by the urban poor. This, combined with the effects of a slow-down in the global economy in 1970, prompted the electorate to change the government, electing the PNP (People’s National Party) in 1972. However, despite efforts to create more socially equitable policies in education and health, Jamaica continued to lag economically, with its gross national product having fallen in 1980 to some twenty-five percent below the 1972 level. Rising foreign and local debt accompanied by large fiscal deficits resulted in the invitation of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) financing from the USA and others, and the imposition of IMF austerity measures (with a greater than 25% interest rate per year).

Economic deterioration continued into the mid 1980s, exacerbated by the closure of the first (Alpart) and third (Alcoa) largest alumina producers, significant reduction in production by the second largest (Alcan), the exit of Reynolds Jamaica Mines Ltd from the Jamaican industry and reduced flows from tourism. During the 1980s Jamaica was still a prosperous country though increases in crime and petty theft began to weigh on the island.

The early capital of Jamaica was Spanish Town in the parish of St. Catherine, the site of the old Spanish colonial capital. The Spanish named the town Santiago de la Vega. In 1655 when the English captured the island, much of the old Spanish capital was burned by the invading troops. The town was rebuilt by the English and renamed Spanish Town. It remained the capital until 1872, when the city of Kingston was named the capital.

Geography Location: Caribbean, island in the Caribbean Sea, south of Cuba
Geographic coordinates: 18 15 N, 77 30 W
Map references: Central America and the Caribbean
Area: total: 10,991 sq km
land: 10,831 sq km
water: 160 sq km
Area – comparative: slightly smaller than Connecticut
Land boundaries: 0 km
Coastline: 1,022 km
Maritime claims: measured from claimed archipelagic straight baselines
territorial sea: 12 nm
contiguous zone: 24 nm
exclusive economic zone: 200 nm
continental shelf: 200 nm or to edge of the continental margin
Climate: tropical; hot, humid; temperate interior
Terrain: mostly mountains, with narrow, discontinuous coastal plain
Elevation extremes: lowest point: Caribbean Sea 0 m
highest point: Blue Mountain Peak 2,256 m
Natural resources: bauxite, gypsum, limestone
Land use: arable land: 15.83%
permanent crops: 10.01%
other: 74.16% (2005)
Irrigated land: 250 sq km (2002)
Total renewable water resources: 9.4 cu km (2000)
Freshwater withdrawal (domestic/industrial/agricultural): total: 0.41 cu km/yr (34%/17%/49%)
per capita: 155 cu m/yr (2000)
Natural hazards: hurricanes (especially July to November)
Environment – current issues: heavy rates of deforestation; coastal waters polluted by industrial waste, sewage, and oil spills; damage to coral reefs; air pollution in Kingston results from vehicle emissions
Environment – international agreements: party to: Biodiversity, Climate Change, Climate Change-Kyoto Protocol, Desertification, Endangered Species, Hazardous Wastes, Law of the Sea, Marine Dumping, Marine Life Conservation, Ozone Layer Protection, Ship Pollution, Wetlands
signed, but not ratified: none of the selected agreements
Geography – note: strategic location between Cayman Trench and Jamaica Channel, the main sea lanes for the Panama Canal
Politics Jamaica is a constitutional monarchy with the monarch being represented by a Governor-General.[3] The head of state is Queen Elizabeth II, who officially uses the title “Queen of Jamaica” when she visits the country or performs duties overseas on Jamaica’s behalf. See Jamaican Royal Family. The Governor-General is nominated by the Prime Minister and the entire Cabinet and appointed by the monarch. All the members of the Cabinet are appointed by the Governor-General on the advice of the Prime Minister. The monarch and the Governor-General serve largely ceremonial roles, apart from their potent reserve power to dismiss the Prime Minister or Parliament.

Jamaica’s current Constitution was drafted in 1962 by a bipartisan joint committee of the Jamaican legislature. It came into force with the Jamaica Independence Act, 1962 of the United Kingdom Parliament, which gave Jamaica political independence. This was followed by a reformation of the island’s flag.

Inside the Jamaican Parliament

The Parliament of Jamaica is bicameral, consisting of the House of Representatives (Lower House) and the Senate (Upper House). Members of the House (known as Members of Parliament or MPs) are directly elected, and the member of the House of Representatives who, in the Governor-General’s best judgement, is best able to command the confidence of a majority of the members of that House, is appointed by the Governor-General to be the Prime Minister. Senators are appointed jointly by the Prime Minister and the parliamentary Leader of the Opposition.

In February 2006, Portia Simpson-Miller was elected by delegates of the ruling People’s National Party (PNP) to replace P. J. Patterson as President of the Party. At the end of March 2006 when Patterson demitted office, Simpson-Miller became the first female Prime Minister of Jamaica. Former Prime Minister Patterson had held office since the 1992 resignation of Michael Manley. Patterson was re-elected three times, the last being in 2002.

On 3 September 2007, Bruce Golding of the Jamaica Labour Party was voted in as Prime Minister-Designate after achieving a 33 – 27 seat victory over Portia Simpson-Miller and the PNP in the 2007 Jamaican general election. Portia Simpson-Miller conceded defeat on the 5 September 2007.[4] On 11 September 2007, after being sworn in by Governor-General Kenneth Hall, The Hon. Bruce Golding assumed office as Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Jamaica has traditionally had a two-party system, with power often alternating between the People’s National Party and Jamaica Labour Party (JLP). However, over the past decade a new political party called the National Democratic Movement (NDM) emerged in an attempt to challenge the two-party system. Unfortunately, the NDM has almost become irrelevant in the two party system as it garnered only 540 votes of the over 800,000 votes cast in the September 3 elections. Jamaica is a full and participating member of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM).

People Population: 2,780,132 (July 2007 est.)
Age structure: 0-14 years: 32.5% (male 459,968/female 444,963)
15-64 years: 60.1% (male 822,486/female 848,310)
65 years and over: 7.4% (male 91,856/female 112,549) (2007 est.)
Median age: total: 23.2 years
male: 22.6 years
female: 23.7 years (2007 est.)
Population growth rate: 0.777% (2007 est.)
Birth rate: 20.44 births/1,000 population (2007 est.)
Death rate: 6.59 deaths/1,000 population (2007 est.)
Net migration rate: -6.07 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2007 est.)
Sex ratio: at birth: 1.05 male(s)/female
under 15 years: 1.034 male(s)/female
15-64 years: 0.97 male(s)/female
65 years and over: 0.816 male(s)/female
total population: 0.978 male(s)/female (2007 est.)
Infant mortality rate: total: 15.73 deaths/1,000 live births
male: 16.4 deaths/1,000 live births
female: 15.01 deaths/1,000 live births (2007 est.)
Life expectancy at birth: total population: 73.12 years
male: 71.43 years
female: 74.9 years (2007 est.)
Total fertility rate: 2.36 children born/woman (2007 est.)
HIV/AIDS – adult prevalence rate: 1.2% (2003 est.)
HIV/AIDS – people living with HIV/AIDS: 22,000 (2003 est.)
HIV/AIDS – deaths: 900 (2003 est.)
Nationality: noun: Jamaican(s)
adjective: Jamaican
Ethnic groups: black 91.2%, mixed 6.2%, other or unknown 2.6% (2001 census)
Religions: Protestant 62.5% (Seventh-Day Adventist 10.8%, Pentecostal 9.5%, Other Church of God 8.3%, Baptist 7.2%, New Testament Church of God 6.3%, Church of God in Jamaica 4.8%, Church of God of Prophecy 4.3%, Anglican 3.6%, other Christian 7.7%), Roman Catholic 2.6%, other or unspecified 14.2%, none 20.9%, (2001 census)
Languages: English, English patois
Literacy: definition: age 15 and over has ever attended school
total population: 87.9%
male: 84.1%
female: 91.6%

Turks and Caicos Islands: The Truth Knowledge And History Of

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE CIA FACT BOOK)

 

Turks and Caicos Islands

Introduction The islands were part of the UK’s Jamaican colony until 1962, when they assumed the status of a separate crown colony upon Jamaica’s independence. The governor of The Bahamas oversaw affairs from 1965 to 1973. With Bahamian independence, the islands received a separate governor in 1973. Although independence was agreed upon for 1982, the policy was reversed and the islands remain a British overseas territory.
History Early inhabitants of the islands were Amerindians, including the Arawak people, who were, over the centuries, gradually replaced by the Caribs. The first documented European to sight the islands was Spanish conquistador Juan Ponce de León, who did so in 1512. During the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries, the islands passed from Spanish, to French, to British control, but none of the three powers ever established any settlements.

For several decades around the turn of the 18th century they became popular pirate hideouts. Bermudian salt collectors settled the Turk Islands around 1680. In 1765–1783 they were under French occupation. After the American Revolution (1775–1783) many loyalists fled to Caribbean colonies, including (in 1783) the first settlers on the Caicos Islands; cotton became an important crop briefly. In 1799, both the Turks and the Caicos island groups were annexed by Britain as part of the Bahamas.

In 1841 the Trouvadore, a Spanish ship engaged in the slave trade, wrecked off the coast of East Caicos, one of the larger Caicos Islands. One hundred and ninety-two captive African Blacks survived the sinking and made it to shore where, under British rule, the slave trade was illegal. These survivors were apprenticed to trades for one year then settled mostly on Grand Turk Island. An 1878 letter documents the “Trouvadore Africans” and their descendants as constituting an essential part of the “labouring population” on the islands. In 2004 marine archaeologists rediscovered a wreck, called the “Black Rock Ship,” that subsequent research has suggested may be that of the Trouvadore. This suggestion was further supported when a marine archaeology expedition funded by NOAA in November of 2008 confirmed that the wreck comprises artifacts whose time of manufacture and style support the association of this wreck with that of the Trouvadore. The wreckage has, however, not been identified with absolute certainty.

In 1848 the Turks and Caicos were declared a separate colony under a council president. The last incumbent was maintained in 1873 when the islands were made part of Jamaica colony; in 1894 the chief colonial official was restyled commissioner. In 1917, Canadian Prime Minister Robert Borden suggested that the Turks and Caicos join Canada, but this suggestion was shot down by British prime minister David Lloyd George. The islands remained a dependency of Jamaica until 1959.

On 4 July 1959, the islands were again a separate colony, the last commissioner being restyled administrator, but the governor of Jamaica remained the governor of the islands. Until 31 May 1962, they were one of the constitutive parts of the Federation of the West Indies.

When Jamaica was granted independence from Britain in August 1962, the Turks and Caicos Islands became a crown colony. From 1965, the governor of the Bahamas was also governor of the Turks and Caicos Islands and oversaw affairs for the islands. When the Bahamas gained independence in 1973, the Turks and Caicos received their own governor (the last administrator was restyled). In 1974, Canadian New Democratic Party MP Max Saltsman tried to use his Private Member’s Bill to create legislation to annex the islands to Canada, but it didn’t pass in the Canadian House of Commons.

The islands have had their own government headed by a chief minister since August 1976. In 1979, independence was agreed upon in principle for 1982, but a change in government caused a policy reversal, and they instead approached the Canadian government to discuss a possible union, but at the time the Canadian Government was embroiled in a debate over free trade with the U.S., and little attention was paid to the suggestion. The islands’ political troubles in recent years have resulted in a rewritten constitution promulgated in 2006.

Geography Location: Caribbean, two island groups in the North Atlantic Ocean, southeast of The Bahamas, north of Haiti
Geographic coordinates: 21 45 N, 71 35 W
Map references: Central America and the Caribbean
Area: total: 430 sq km
land: 430 sq km
water: 0 sq km
Area – comparative: 2.5 times the size of Washington, DC
Land boundaries: 0 km
Coastline: 389 km
Maritime claims: territorial sea: 12 nm
exclusive fishing zone: 200 nm
Climate: tropical; marine; moderated by trade winds; sunny and relatively dry
Terrain: low, flat limestone; extensive marshes and mangrove swamps
Elevation extremes: lowest point: Caribbean Sea 0 m
highest point: Blue Hills 49 m
Natural resources: spiny lobster, conch
Land use: arable land: 2.33%
permanent crops: 0%
other: 97.67% (2005)
Irrigated land: NA
Natural hazards: frequent hurricanes
Environment – current issues: limited natural fresh water resources, private cisterns collect rainwater
Geography – note: about 40 islands (eight inhabited)
Politics The Turks and Caicos Islands are a British Overseas Territory, an autonomous part of the United Kingdom. The United Nations Committee on Decolonisation includes the territory on the United Nations list of Non-Self-Governing Territories. The islands adopted a constitution on 30 August 1976, which is Constitution Day, the national holiday. The constitution was suspended in 1986, but restored and revised 5 March 1988. A new constitution came into force on 9 August 2006. The territory’s legal system is based on English common law, with a small number of laws adopted from Jamaica and the Bahamas. Suffrage is universal for those over 18 years of age. English is the official language. Grand Turk is the administrative and political capital of the Turks and Caicos Islands and Cockburn Town has been the seat of government since 1766.

As a British territory, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom is the sovereign, represented by a governor. The head of government is the premier. The cabinet consists of three ex officio members and five appointed by the governor from among the members of the House of Assembly. The monarch is hereditary, the governor is appointed by the monarch, and the premier appointed by the governor.

The unicameral House of Assembly consists of 21 seats, of which 15 are popularly elected; members serve four-year terms. Elections in the Turks and Caicos Islands were held on 24 April 2003 and again on 9 February 2007. The Progressive National Party, led by Michael Misick holds thirteen seats, and the People’s Democratic Movement, led by Floyd Seymour, holds two seats.

The judicial branch of government is headed by a Supreme Court and appeals are heard by the court of appeals and final appeals by the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court was Gordon Ward. The islands also have a Court of Appeal with a President and at least two Justices of Appeal.

The Turks and Caicos Islands participate in the Caribbean Development Bank, is an associate in CARICOM, and maintains an Interpol sub-bureau. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. In December 2004, the islands sought to become a new associate member to the Association of Caribbean States article.

In 2008, after members of the British parliament conducting a routine review the administration received several reports of high level official corruption in the Turks and Caicos, Governor Richard Tauwhare announced the appointment of a Commission of Enquiry into corruption. The same year, Premier Michael Misick himself became the focus of a criminal investigation after a woman identified by news outlets as an American citizen residing in Puerto Rico accused him of sexually assaulting her although he strongly denies the charge.

People Population: 22,352 (July 2008 est.)
Age structure: 0-14 years: 30.7% (male 3,497/female 3,374)
15-64 years: 65.2% (male 7,640/female 6,929)
65 years and over: 4.1% (male 435/female 477) (2008 est.)
Median age: total: 27.8 years
male: 28.5 years
female: 27 years (2008 est.)
Population growth rate: 2.644% (2008 est.)
Birth rate: 21.12 births/1,000 population (2008 est.)
Death rate: 4.16 deaths/1,000 population (2008 est.)
Net migration rate: 9.48 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2008 est.)
Sex ratio: at birth: 1.05 male(s)/female
under 15 years: 1.04 male(s)/female
15-64 years: 1.1 male(s)/female
65 years and over: 0.91 male(s)/female
total population: 1.07 male(s)/female (2008 est.)
Infant mortality rate: total: 14.35 deaths/1,000 live births
male: 16.56 deaths/1,000 live births
female: 12.04 deaths/1,000 live births (2008 est.)
Life expectancy at birth: total population: 75.19 years
male: 72.91 years
female: 77.59 years (2008 est.)
Total fertility rate: 2.98 children born/woman (2008 est.)
HIV/AIDS – adult prevalence rate: NA
HIV/AIDS – people living with HIV/AIDS: NA
HIV/AIDS – deaths: NA
Nationality: noun: none
adjective: none
Ethnic groups: black 90%, mixed, European, or North American 10%
Religions: Baptist 40%, Anglican 18%, Methodist 16%, Church of God 12%, other 14% (1990)
Languages: English (official)
Literacy: definition: age 15 and over has ever attended school
total population: 98%
male: 99%
female: 98% (1970 est.)
School life expectancy (primary to tertiary education): total: 11 years
male: 11 years
female: 12 years (2005)
Education expenditures: NA
People – note: destination and transit point for illegal Haitian immigrants bound for the Turks and Caicos Islands, The Bahamas, and the US
Government Country name: conventional long form: none
conventional short form: Turks and Caicos Islands
abbreviation: TCI
Dependency status: overseas territory of the UK
Government type: NA
Capital: name: Grand Turk (Cockburn Town)
geographic coordinates: 21 28 N, 71 08 W
time difference: UTC-5 (same time as Washington, DC during Standard Time)
daylight saving time: +1hr, begins first Sunday in April; ends last Sunday in October
Administrative divisions: none (overseas territory of the UK)
Independence: none (overseas territory of the UK)
National holiday: Constitution Day, 30 August (1976)
Constitution: Turks and Caicos Islands Constitution Order 2006 (effective 9 August 2006)
Legal system: based on laws of England and Wales, with a few adopted from Jamaica and The Bahamas
Suffrage: 18 years of age; universal
Executive branch: chief of state: Queen ELIZABETH II (since 6 February 1952); represented by Governor Gordon WETHERELL (since 5 August 2008)
head of government: Premier Michael Eugene MISICK (chief minister since 15 August 2003, sworn in as premier on 9 August 2006); note – the office of premier was created in the 2006 constitution
cabinet: Cabinet consists of the governor, the premier, six ministers appointed by the governor from among the members of the House of Assembly, and the attorney general
elections: the monarch is hereditary; governor appointed by the monarch; following legislative elections, the leader of the majority party is appointed premier by the governor
Legislative branch: unicameral House of Assembly (21 seats of which 15 are popularly elected; members serve four-year terms)
elections: last held 9 February 2007 (next to be held in 2011)
election results: percent of vote by party – PNP 60%, PDM 40%; seats by party – PNP 13, PDM 2
Judicial branch: Supreme Court; Court of Appeal
Political parties and leaders: People’s Democratic Movement or PDM [Floyd SEYMOUR]; Progressive National Party or PNP [Michael Eugene MISICK]
Political pressure groups and leaders: NA
International organization participation: Caricom (associate), CDB, Interpol (subbureau), UPU
Diplomatic representation in the US: none (overseas territory of the UK)
Diplomatic representation from the US: none (overseas territory of the UK)
Flag description: blue, with the flag of the UK in the upper hoist-side quadrant and the colonial shield centered on the outer half of the flag; the shield is yellow and contains a conch shell, lobster, and cactus
Culture The Turks and Caicos Islands are most well known for ripsaw music. The islands are known for their annual Music and Cultural Festival showcasing many local talents and other dynamic performances by many music celebrities from around the Caribbean and United States.

Wenika Ewing was the islands’ representative to the Miss Universe contest in 2005.

The island’s most popular sports are fishing, sailing, soccer and rugby is growing especially amongst the island’s ex-pat population

Economy Economy – overview: The Turks and Caicos economy is based on tourism, offshore financial services, and fishing. Most capital goods and food for domestic consumption are imported. The US is the leading source of tourists, accounting for more than three-quarters of the 175,000 visitors that arrived in 2004. Major sources of government revenue also include fees from offshore financial activities and customs receipts.
GDP (purchasing power parity): $216 million (2002 est.)
GDP (official exchange rate): $NA
GDP – real growth rate: 4.9% (2000 est.)
GDP – per capita (PPP): $11,500 (2002 est.)
GDP – composition by sector: agriculture: NA%
industry: NA%
services: NA%
Labor force: 4,848 (1990 est.)
Labor force – by occupation: note: about 33% in government and 20% in agriculture and fishing; significant numbers in tourism, financial, and other services
Unemployment rate: 10% (1997 est.)
Population below poverty line: NA%
Household income or consumption by percentage share: lowest 10%: NA%
highest 10%: NA%
Budget: revenues: $47 million
expenditures: $33.6 million (1997-98 est.)
Fiscal year: calendar year
Inflation rate (consumer prices): 4% (1995)
Agriculture – products: corn, beans, cassava (tapioca), citrus fruits; fish
Industries: tourism, offshore financial services
Electricity – production: 10 million kWh (2006 est.)
Electricity – consumption: 9.3 million kWh (2006 est.)
Electricity – exports: 0 kWh (2007 est.)
Electricity – imports: 0 kWh (2007 est.)
Electricity – production by source: fossil fuel: 100%
hydro: 0%
nuclear: 0%
other: 0% (2001)
Oil – production: 0 bbl/day (2007 est.)
Oil – consumption: 80 bbl/day (2006 est.)
Oil – exports: 0 bbl/day (2005)
Oil – imports: 83.78 bbl/day (2005)
Oil – proved reserves: 0 bbl (1 January 2006 est.)
Natural gas – production: 0 cu m (2007 est.)
Natural gas – consumption: 0 cu m (2007 est.)
Natural gas – exports: 0 cu m (2007 est.)
Natural gas – imports: 0 cu m (2007 est.)
Natural gas – proved reserves: 0 cu m (1 January 2006 est.)
Exports: $169.2 million (2000)
Exports – commodities: lobster, dried and fresh conch, conch shells
Imports: $175.6 million (2000)
Imports – commodities: food and beverages, tobacco, clothing, manufactures, construction materials
Economic aid – recipient: $4.1 million (1997)
Debt – external: $NA
Currency (code): US dollar (USD)
Currency code: USD
Exchange rates: the US dollar is used
Communications Telephones – main lines in use: 5,700 (2002)
Telephones – mobile cellular: 1,700 (1999)
Telephone system: general assessment: fully digital system with international direct dialing
domestic: full range of services available; GSM wireless service available
international: country code – 1-649; the Americas Region Caribbean Ring System (ARCOS-1) fiber optic telecommunications submarine cable provides connectivity to South and Central America, parts of the Caribbean, and the US; satellite earth station – 1 Intelsat (Atlantic Ocean)
Radio broadcast stations: AM 2, FM 7, shortwave 0 (2003)
Radios: 8,000 (1997)
Television broadcast stations: 0 (broadcasts received from The Bahamas; 2 cable television networks) (2003)
Televisions: NA
Internet country code: .tc
Internet hosts: 2,352 (2008)
Internet Service Providers (ISPs): 14 (2000)
Internet users: NA
Transportation Airports: 8 (2007)
Airports – with paved runways: total: 6
1,524 to 2,437 m: 3
914 to 1,523 m: 1
under 914 m: 2 (2007)
Airports – with unpaved runways: total: 2
under 914 m: 2 (2007)
Roadways: total: 121 km
paved: 24 km
unpaved: 97 km (2003)
Merchant marine: registered in other countries: 1 (Panama 1) (2008)
Ports and terminals: Grand Turk, Providenciales
Military Manpower reaching militarily significant age annually: male: 222
female: 214 (2008 est.)
Military – note: defense is the responsibility of the UK
Transnational Issues Disputes – international: have received Haitians fleeing economic and civil disorder
Illicit drugs: transshipment point for South American narcotics destined for the US and Europe

World Celebrates Bob Marley Day, Reggae is Changing So Are Its Fans

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF GLOBAL VOICES)

 

As the World Celebrates Bob Marley Day, Reggae is Changing and So Are Its Fans

A mural of reggae icon Bob Marley; photo by Vanessa, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Reggae icon Bob (Robert Nesta) Marley was born on February 6, 1945; his birthday is now celebrated around the world as Bob Marley Day. This year, he would have turned 73 years old. Marley’s hometown of Kingston, Jamaica, is now recognised by UNESCO as a Creative City of Music.

As the anointed birthplace of reggae music, music-lovers from all over the world make the pilgrimage to the Bob Marley Museum in uptown Kingston, the site of Marley’s former home. Visitors also head downtown to tour Tuff Gong Studios, founded by Marley in 1965, and the “Culture Yard” in Trench Town, where Marley grew up, learned to play guitar and formed his band, the Wailers.

Bob Marley remains an enduring icon and legacy in Jamaica, but as musical tastes and trends change, some Jamaicans wonder if the spirit of traditional roots reggae may be fading.

Reggae Month, first announced by the Jamaican government in 2008, is currently underway in Jamaica.

While passing by Marley’s former home, a fan tweeted a photo of the festivities celebrating Bob Marley Day:

The museum itself shared a live stream:

The veteran British reggae band UB40 posted their congratulations:

Jamaican public and private institutions posted creative tweets, Marley quotes and of course, music:

AK Dixon, a Jamaican living in Toronto, Canada, where Bob Marley Day is annually celebrated, urged Jamaica to step up its game:

The American rapper Common added his birthday wishes on Twitter, acknowledging what he learned from Marley:

Happy Born Day Bob Marley! Thank you for showing me how to use my art to help the people.

From Los Angeles, California, Twitter user Isaac Bryan reminded us of Marley’s activism:

On the born day of Bob Marley we are reminded-

“Get up, stand up, Stand up for your rights. Get up, stand up, Don’t give up the fight.” 🇯🇲

To mark the day, Damian “Junior Gong” Marley tweeted a charming childhood photograph of himself with his father:

Are young Jamaicans missing the reggae vibes?

While Bob Marley Day sparked celebratory social media posts from the Jamaican diaspora as well as non-Jamaican individuals and organisations, young Jamaicans were relatively quiet online.

Winston Barnes, a Florida-based Jamaican who hosts a radio talk show for the diaspora, bemoaned a perceived declining interest in reggae music, blaming the embrace of Western music styles such as hip hop:

I am now convinced that Marley’s work was in vain. At least for Jamaicans. We know so little about what he did, as evidenced by our disrespect for his work and by extension our culture. Jamaica has many more radio stations than ever and cumulatively, they play less Jamaican music than before. This at a time when Jamaicans create and produce virtually every genre of music! What would we say to Bob if he was among us physically? I listened to a motivational feature on Jamaican radio last evening and virtually all the inserts originated from outside of Jamaica! In 2018?
Foreigners respect and regard Marley’s music, at least publicly more than we ever have even in 2018! I am now convinced that maybe it is too late to fix this problem we face as a country and as a culture…and then we turn around and talk rubbish about the Grammies and Reggae!

Barnes refers to complaints by Jamaicans that the Grammy Awards do not give enough credit to reggae music, since the award is not televised.

Stephen Cooper agreed:

And last year when Raging Fyah’s Album “Everlasting” was nominated, same comments when Ziggy won. Maybe it is time for the Caribbean to have their own “Grammy” type of Ceremony.

It’s very unfortunate. Despite the fact that many reggae artists insist they don’t really care about the Grammys—in part because they know it’s a scam—the Grammys are one of the few places where reggae is recognized on the international stage. And, it clearly boosts record sales.

Many Jamaicans felt Chronixx, a young, up-and-coming reggae artist, should have won the Grammy instead of granting it to Damian “Jr. Gong” Marley. Of all the members of the Marley family, only a few live in Jamaica, while others occasionally visit. However, other social media users applauded Jr. Gong’s “Stony Hill” album as a quality contender:

Deep down we all wanted the yute from del la Vega get it…but the Grammy kids gave it to the dread from stonyhill…welldone

The ‘Marley factor’ and the future of reggae

Dr. Sonijah Stanley Niaah, of the Institute of Caribbean Studies and Reggae Studies Unit at the University of the West Indies, explained the ‘Marley factor’:

Jamaica is this cool place on the world map that is hardly visible, but everyone knows of the little rock because of its musical legacy. When it comes to the Grammys, Jamaica is always present. In the 2018 staging it was Shaggy’s on-stage performance that ensured Jamaica’s presence at the live Grammy show, and when he uttered “I’m a Jamaican in New York”…the crowd response peaked.

However, it wasn’t Shaggy’s performance which caused all the backstage rumbling that kept Jamaicans awash with emotion. It was Jr Gong [Damian Marley], and, more specifically, the ‘Marley factor.’

…This abundance of presence at the Grammys on the part of the Marleys has concerned Jamaicans in particular, and thus each year upon the release of the nominees for the ‘Best Reggae Album’ category, there is the inevitable combination of glee, grief, concern, and trepidation.

…Chronixx was leading in the court of public opinion ahead of all the other nominees and in particular, the only one close to him was Morgan Heritage, who were nominated for their Avrakedabra album, in the poll conducted by the Recording Academy. Unfortunately, the award is not granted on the basis of public opinion, sales figures, or even musical appeal…

To date, Ziggy Marley has won a total of seven Grammys. Stephen and Damian Marley as well as Bunny Wailer (a Marley connection), won three each.

Despite this — or perhaps because of it — a Kingston-based blogger believed the Rastafarian spirit and energy of reggae music could be losing its power:

It was through music that slaves communicated, the drums warned other slaves and motivated them toward rebellion and change. Reggae music with its origin in Jamaica was one of the most effective tools in advocating for peace and unity, challenging political movements and creating change

Bob Marley’s messages of love and unity was perhaps not as successful in the 1970s because our violence was imported and managed by and for external interests. As Babylon prepares for its fall, its hold on Jamaica is compromised, and this is the right time for the Rastafari messages of love and unity. Consciousness and liberation are still some of the messages we associate and expect from Rasta, unfortunately, it would appear that Rasta has lost its value locally and as an agent of change in our society.

Bob Marley, Reggae music and Rastafarianism represents a few of the most renowned parts of Jamaican culture, it seems however that the Marley legacy is busy chasing Grammys as opposed to using music to create change…as was the real impassioned legacy of Robert Nesta Marley, Reggae and Rastafari. We are left with Capitalist Rastafari, token international Grammy awards, and an ailing culture directed by dancehall music, reversely influenced by Hip-hop and the American lifestyle!

Entertainment lawyer Lloyd Stanbury agreed:

Reggae requires much more than the focus on who wins “Best Reggae Album” at the GRAMMYS

While younger Jamaicans acknowledge the Marley legacy, reggae music and its fans are changing as the world changes.

Chronixx, whose lyrics deal with climate change, rising crime, and internet addiction, is being called the “new golden boy” of reggae. His hit song “Do It for the Love, not for the Likes”, became a popular Jamaican catchphrase and hashtag, #DoItFortheLove.

In response to all these changes, if Bob Marley were alive today he might well remind us of a line from his song “Natural Mystic”: “There’s a natural mystic blowing through the air…if you listen carefully now you will hear.” In other words, time, space — and everything in it — move along naturally. Maybe in the end, it all comes down to the music, no matter how it evolves.

Jamaica declares emergency over parts of island as gun crime soars

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF ‘THE INDEPENDENT’)

 

Jamaica declares emergency over parts of island as gun crime soars

Montego Bay, where authorities are battling to stem a wave of killings

Montego Bay, Jamaica | AFP | Jamaica has declared a state of emergency in the island’s second city Montego Bay, where authorities are battling to stem a wave of killings.

Tourists have been urged to remain in their resorts following the declaration by Prime Minister Andrew Holness on Thursday, resulting in the deployment of thousands of members of the military and police in the city of 200,000, home to some of the biggest and most luxurious resorts on the island.

The move came days after the United States upgraded its travel advisory to its citizens. Canada and Great Britain issued warnings following the declaration of emergency.

“You should limit your movements outside of resorts in the area at this time, and exercise particular care if travelling at night,” Britain’s foreign office said on its website.

Montego Bay has seen its murder rate rise over several years with a record 335 deaths in 2017, most tied to gang violence, and an illegal lottery scam that has fleeced hundreds of mostly older Americans out of millions of dollars.

Earlier in the week, Holness had said his government had “reached the point where we are now prepared to take these firm and resolute measures to ensure that the crime monster does not destabilize the promising future that is in store for Jamaica.”

He added that under the state of public emergency the security forces will have extraordinary powers, and some rights will be suspended, but said it did not mean that force would be arbitrary or beyond review.

Fitz Jackson, a spokesman for the opposition, said his People’s National Party “lends qualified support to this effort and will await the regulations governing the operations of the state of emergency which are required to be placed before the Parliament.”

The move was also supported by the Jamaica Chamber of Commerce, citing the danger violence represents to the tourism-dependent economy.

Amnesty International has in the past criticized Jamaican authorities for a large number of unlawful killings carried out by police and their intimidation of victims’ families.

Jamaica, with a population of 2.7 million, recorded 43 murders per 100,000 in 2015, one of the world’s highest rates.

Jamaican Scientist’s Marijuana-Based Anti-Cancer Drug Has Been Approved by the FDA

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF GLOBAL VOICES)

This Jamaican Scientist’s Marijuana-Based Anti-Cancer Drug Has Been Approved by the FDA

Sativa; photo by Dank Depot, CC BY-NC 2.0.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently granted orphan drug approvalfor Chrysoeriol, a cannabis-based drug used to treat acute myeloid leukaemia, which was developed by Jamaican scientist Dr. Henry Lowe.

Dr. Lowe founded Medicanja Ltd — described as “Jamaica’s first medical cannabis company” — in 2013. Its distinguished board of directors includes two former prime ministers and a former governor general.

The US Orphan Drug Act gives special status to a drug or biological product to treat a rare disease or condition upon the request of a sponsor. Under the act, Dr Lowe will qualify for some development incentives, including tax credits for some clinical testing.

After presenting his research findings at the 2017 Global Health Catalyst Summit at Harvard Medical School in April 2017, Dr. Lowe made the announcement at a July 12 press conference at his wellness resort in Kingston, which both Prime Minister Andrew Holness and Science and Technology Minister Dr. Andrew Wheatley attended.

The prime minister congratulated Dr. Lowe, while injecting a note of caution when he promised that the government will ensure compliance with international standards, “because cannabis and the (medication) that could potentially come from it are still not recognised in many countries, and some countries still consider it illegal”.

Chrysoeriol was developed by Dr. Lowe’s Maryland-based company, Flavocure Biotech LLC; he insists that he will not allow “big pharma” to purchase the drug, which he says would “park” it, despite the $15 million to $50 million (USD) such a sale would potentially earn him.

Rather, he is hoping to make enough money — US $3.5 million to be exact — to continue his research and ready the drug for the retail market in about two to three years’ time. While he is hoping to raise the necessary funding locally, Jamaican banks have not been as supportive as he would have hoped.

Science and Technology Minister Dr. Andrew Wheatley supported Dr. Lowe’s stance, reiterating that it is important for Jamaicans to “own the rights to our research…and not become second-hand users or owners of the products”.

Not all Jamaicans agree, however, agree with this approach. On Facebook, Ronnie Sutherland suggested:

Dr Henry Lowe take the US$50 million and use it to research some other drugs or go enjoy yourself on the beach. Your talent is in research. You do not have the capital or what it takes to bring this drug to market. That’s where the big pharmaceutical companies that you are resisting come in. You seem to want all and may lose all in the process.

For his part, Dr. Lowe took the opportunity to call for more financial support for scientific research in Jamaica, explaining that if the country procured even a fraction of the lucrative global pharmaceutical and nutraceuticals industries, it would help economic growth. Jamaica is currently doing quite well under an International Monetary Fund Precautionary Stand By Arrangement , but still struggles with low growth.

Jamaicans responded positively to the news of one of their own — and a scientist at that — making such an important contribution to cancer treatment:

Public relations guru Jean Lowrie-Chin tweeted:

On the other hand, the news prompted some to return to a widely held belief that Jamaica has not taken sufficient steps to regulate or profit from marijuana (locally known as ganja), whether medicinal or recreational.

Journalist Owen James noted:

It has been a long journey for Dr. Lowe. I vividly recall our interview re the attempts to patent another drug and how it faltered.

The Dangerous Drugs (Amendment) Act 2015, also referred to as the Ganja Reform Law, created the framework for the decriminalisation of offences under the Act, making possession of less than two ounces of ganja only a ticketable offence and no longer a crime.

The legislation also created the framework for the development of legal medical marijuana, hemp and nutraceutical industries, and for the establishment of the Cannabis Licensing Authority (CLA) to oversee the implementation of regulations for licences, permits and other authorisations for the cultivation, processing, distribution, sale and transportation of ganja.

One Jamaican felt that Dr. Lowe would not be given credit by some politicians, because they don’t want to address the issue:

Looking out for the politicians who going rally round Henry Lowe and him newly approved ganja based drug

Didn’t the PM speak about it, and tweet about this achievement? https://twitter.com/Aujae_Dixon/status/888774538405826560 

The point of my tweet is that they should all shut up about anything Lowe achieves until they start doing something abt ganja. From PM down

This, even though there is potentially money to be made from recreational ganja in Jamaica:

One Jamaican thought that the country should get with the times:

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-40586480  – – – just leaving this here… Wake up

Cannabis plant

Marijuana shortage: Nevada considers emergency measures – BBC News

Less than two weeks after recreational use was legalised, supplies in the state are running out.

bbc.com

Others weren’t prepared to wait. Grammy-nominated Jamaican reggae band Raging Fyah, currently on tour in the United Staes, announced its own brand of marijuana, to be sold in Colorado:

While many Jamaicans remain impatient, the Jamaican government is taking tentative steps towards embracing the potentially profitable nutraceutical business — including a closer look at medicinal marijuana. At the same time, Health Minister Christopher Tufton has just announced that the National Council on Drug Abuse will be launching a full-scale public education programme on the dangers of ganja smoking among adolescents.

Jamaica’s First Woman Prime Minister Retires Amidst Praise, Criticism

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF GOOGLE PLUS’S GLOBAL VOICES)

 

Jamaica’s First Woman Prime Minister Retires Amidst Praise, Criticism — and a Contentious Battle to Succeed Her

Former prime minister of Jamaica, Portia Simpson-Miller, when she attended the ceremony unveiling the winning design for the slavery memorial at the United Nations (in her capacity, as then prime minister). Photo by United Nations Information Centres, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.

On June 29, 2017, Jamaica’s first female prime minister, Portia Simpson-Millermade her final speech in parliament. It marked, at the age of 72, her retirement from representational politics.

Simpson-Miller had been under some pressure to step down as opposition leader ever since the People’s National Party (PNP), under her leadership, lost the general elections in February 2016. Former finance minister, Peter Phillips, was returned unopposed as party leader, and sworn in as opposition leader on April 3, 2017.

Ms. Simpson Miller was showered with tributes by colleagues on both sides of the house in a joint sitting of parliament on June 27, where she was described as a champion of the poor. With rural roots, her political journey as a woman and her personal resilience in the face of stiff challenges were often topics of praise and admiration. However, her leadership skills were often called into question during her two stints as prime minister, and as she left the political stage she still had her detractors.

Outspoken entertainer Tanya Stephens took to Facebook to deliver a devastating critique of Simpson-Miller’s legacy:

Hearing people lament Portia’s departure is like seeing people congratulate my rapist for being a ‘good man’…she isn’t a good person. SHE knows that. Besides unqualified AND an embarrassing representation who wasn’t even of average intelligence as per her public displays, she was also an awful apathetic human who perfected the art of pandering to the hypocrisy of Jamaicans. I’m happy to see her back. I’m not alone. Good riddance.

Stephens responded to the many Jamaicans who were disturbed by her outburst by simply stating:

That it takes ‘audacity’ to criticize a PUBLIC SERVANT is a tragedy.

As a quite unpleasant war of words ensued, community activist Damien Williams shared:

To compare the fanfare & well wishes towards PSM [Portia Simpson-Miller] to that being offered to a rapist is NOT a critique of her capacity, competence or a commentary on her failures but NASTY personal attack, plain and simple. However, to offer a defense of PSM by doing same is equally nasty. Rape is NEVER something you downplay or use to inflict pain/recompense. We certainly can express dissent without ad hominem. We are always so grotesquely excessive and then use as a crutch, freedom of speech. KMT [Kiss my teeth]

Affectionately known as “Mama P,” Simpson-Miller presided over the gritty “garrison” constituency of South West St. Andrew for over four decades. It is an inner city area of the capital, plagued with poor infrastructure, unemployment and poverty. Columnist Martin Henry wrote:

Portia Simpson came to representational politics at the parliamentary level in 1976 when political tribalism and its ugly pickney, political violence, were on the upswing. The state of emergency declared by the Government that year, partly in response to escalating violence associated with the election campaign, assisted the young KSAC councillor to capture what up till then was a safe JLP seat, having never been won before by the PNP since its creation in 1959. Her 76 per cent margin of victory in ’76 just kept growing to the point where it equalled the number of voters, even when a few voted for the JLP candidate.

Since 1976, criminal violence, indexed by murder, has progressively increased, with South West Andrew making its above-average contribution.

Within a week or two of Simpson-Miller’s resignation as a member of parliament, the party became gradually embroiled in a political tussle over her possible successor in the constituency. This was reported and commented on in detail by both traditional and social media. Jamaicans have a taste for political intrigue, and many (especially those with party affiliations) are following every twist and turn with interest.

The story began with a drama — and a murder — when local Councillor Karl Blake (considered a possible successor) was injured and his assistant shot dead at their constituency office. Blake, who has recovered, is reportedly no longer interested in contesting the seat.

While Councillor Audrey Smith-Facey, who is campaigning under the hashtag #OurAudrey, was expected to be the main contender, the waters were muddied considerably when a video was posted of Simpson Miller endorsing former Kingston mayor, Councillor Angela Brown-Burke, to succeed her. This was a surprise to many, with some questioning whether it was genuine, having come after the nomination period had ended; this threw the party into further confusion.

According to one news report, however, party delegates are firmly rejecting Brown-Burke. Many would like to see the young maverick, Damion Crawford, in the seat. Crawford is apparently not interested, but this has not stopped him from seeing the humour in the situation (he locked horns with Brown Burke on social media in 2015):

Crawford himself added:

Noting in fake exasperation:

In moments like these i wish my name wasn’t damion crawford it’s too easy to call. I’m changing it again to Venkatanarasimharajuvaripeta”

Meanwhile, some journalists are enjoying the cut and thrust within the party:

View image on TwitterView image on Twitter

UPDATE: Region 3 Chair @PhillipPaulwell backing Burke. Former Region 1 boss @LisaHannamp supporting . Hanna chides Executive

#OurAudrey shows no sign of backing down, issuing a somewhat sarcastic statement that she expects to be the “standard bearer”. One Jamaican Twitter user was amused:

Loooooooooooooooooooooool. Is which lawyer/PR person write this? Them need to raise them retainer. This was good. https://twitter.com/AbkaFitzHenley/status/887838803305607168 

Not to be outdone, Councillor Brown-Burke is busy campaigning on her Facebook page, with a photo of herself and “her people” in the constituency. She also wasted no time in updating the cover photo on her Facebook page to read, “I’m thankful for my struggle, because without it I wouldn’t have stumbled across my strength!”

After a meeting of the party’s executive council, the PNP has now agreed to hold a selection conference to decide between the two women on July 30, 2017.

The question remains, though: does Portia Simpson-Miller want to remain engaged with the people of South West St. Andrew, whom she described in her farewell speech as her “armour of steel”? Perhaps that depends on which woman succeeds her.

Was It Honest And Fair That The U.S. Ladies Relay Team Got A Redo?

 

(This article is courtesy of the Shanghai Daily News Paper)

Chinese Netizens Fury Over Outrageous US Women’s Solo Run in Relay Heats

2016/08/19
Chen Xiaoli
 (I am an American yet I agree with the Chinese ladies being upset with this decision. I only wish honesty in all things and I do not feel that this was a fair decision.)

The United States controversially qualified for the women’s 4x100m relay final at the Rio Olympics, recording the fastest time in the semifinals after being granted a re-run and competing alone. The result meant China missed out on the final next day after qualifying eighth fastest, Xinhua News Agency reported.

The reigning Olympic champion dropped the baton during the second exchange between Allyson Felix and English Gardner in the second heat.

The Americans protested, claiming Brazilian Franciela Krasucki bumped Felix before the handover.

Race officials then ruled that the Americans must run again, in a highly unusual solo-flying lap — to beat China’s eighth fastest qualifying time of 42.70sec.

Most of the American netizens were happy at this unusual development. A netizen called silkkyfingazz said, “It was a fair and just decision. Fair is fair if it was Jamaica we would have wanted the same opportunity. Justice has been done. Well done by the IOC.”

A netizen from Colorado said, “Trying not to be biased. I think the officials got this one right.”

A netizen from Hawaii also commented, “She was bumped. Glad they got the redo.”

But one poster from Illinois saw it differently. “Do you believe any other country would get a second chance in this situation? Especially Russians? US would be screaming ‘bloody murder’ first. Hypocrites!”

However, the decision angered Chinese officials and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) dismissed their protest.

Chinese athlete Liang Xiaojing questioned, “Where is the pure sport?”

CCTV commentator Yang Jian said on Weibo, “The decision was made against the regularity in relay races and even in all athletic contests.”


Chinese social media users were outraged by the development.

One of them said: “The US team shouldn’t re-run, but Brazil should be disqualified. Otherwise, all the teams should compete again and not just the US alone. What a weird competition!”

“Take pity on our girls. Be strong!”

“The Olympic spirit disappeared. So sad!”

“This is an insult to the athletes. It’s unfair!”

Chinese Athletics Team also said on its official Weibo account, “We refuse to accept the result, but we obey the rules. That is the tolerance of Chinese track and field athletes! Cheer up, Chinese team, Chinese athletics. Girls, we feel proud of you!” It also posted a picture saying, “We don’t re-run, but we’ll re-start. See you in Tokyo!”

 

Building The Love Shack

This is the story of building a cottage , the people and the place. Its a reminder of hope and love.

The Eating Spree

Because food is better shared.

DER KAMERAD

Για του Χριστού την Πίστη την Αγία και της Πατρίδος την Ελευθερία...!

Diary of a Gen-X Traveler

Traveling to experience places not just visit them!

LIVING THE DREAM

FOR A NEW TOMORROW

NoblemanWarrior's Quill

To write to the glory of Christ; the spewed ink of a ragged knight!

Open Your Eyes Too!

Come along on an adventure with us!

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