China: Fraud suspects caught in Ivory Coast

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SHANGHAI CHINA NEWS AGENCY ‘SHINE’)

 

Fraud suspects caught in Ivory Coast

Chen Huizhi
Fraud suspects caught in Ivory Coast

Shanghai police / Ti Gong

The two suspects who are said to have been running a hotel in the Ivory Coast when they were apprehended by Shanghai police.

Two people alleged to have been involved in a fundraising fraud have been flown back to Shanghai from the Ivory Coast, police said on Tuesday.

A man surnamed Peng and a woman surnamed He left China in March 2017. They had been wanted by Interpol since October last year.

Peng, a native of Hunan Province who worked in the iron ore industry, and He are said to have established investment companies in Shanghai and Ningbo, Zhejiang Province, in September 2010 promising high returns.

Police said they established another company in Shanghai in April 2013 and by December 2014 the three companies owed investors from Shanghai over 70 million yuan (US$10 million), while branch companies in Chongqing and Shandong Province also had problems paying investors.

With the total owed amounting to over 100 million yuan by January 2015, police said, the two continued to collect 180 million yuan from the public by promising 35 percent returns from an investment project that didn’t exist.

Police said these funds were used to pay previous debts and for the pair’s own benefit.

An investigation began in September 2017 when police in Changning District received reports from some investors, but the two suspects had left the country.

Police said they received information in February this year that the two were running a hotel in Abidjan in Ivory Coast.

Together with their Ivory Coast counterparts, Shanghai police apprehended the two at the hotel on November 28 and they were flown back to Shanghai on December 2.

Fraud suspects caught in Ivory Coast

Shanghai police

The two suspects alleged to have been involved in a fundraising fraud are accompanied by police as they arrive in Shanghai from Ivory Coast.

Worldwide “Fox Hunt”

Shanghai police said they caught 108 suspects from over 20 countries and regions so far this year as part of China’s “Fox Hunt” campaign targeting economic crime refugees.

On September 5, a man surnamed Ma was extradited from Greece to China.

Ma, who ran a website said to be linked to illegal fundraising sites and who is alleged to have taken kickbacks from those sites for attracting investors, left China in June last year after the case came to light, police said.

Ma was apprehended by Greek police on March 25 this year when he was about to take a flight from Athens.

On November 2, a suspect was returned to Shanghai from Ethiopia after turning himself in.

The suspect, a man surnamed Lu, who worked for a flooring company, is alleged to have illegally sold company products at low prices along with a colleague surnamed Fang. Fang was arrested on a charge of embezzlement.

On November 21, a man surnamed Jia who is said to have issued fake value added tax invoices resulting in a loss of over 2.3 million yuan in tax to the government turned himself in to Shanghai police. He went to Brazil in June 2017.

5 Reasons to See the Ivory Coast for Yourself

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

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5 Reasons to See the Ivory Coast for Yourself

(JUST THOUGHT YOU SHOULD KNOW: GOOGLE SAYS THIS IS NOT CORRECT, IT SAYS THE LARGEST BASILICA IS AT VATICAN CITY.)

Are you up for an off-the-beaten-path African vacation? If so then the Ivory Coast (officially Côte d’Ivoire) could be for you. This West African nation is a bona fide tropical utopia, home to miles of shimmering golden-sand beaches, unspoiled rainforests and lush green countryside. Cities thrive with African and French traditions and majestic wildlife roams freely across national parks. Having broke free from the shackles of a civil war, the Ivory Coast of today has a sanguine outlook and is witnessing modernization while clinging firm to its cultural identity. Here’s five great reasons to make it your next destination on the continent.

The World’s Largest Basilica

Credit: Fabian Plock/iStockphoto

Whether you are a devotee or not, you’ll be blown away by the majesty of the Basilica of Our Lady of Peace of Yamoussoukro. Finished as recently as 1990, this elaborate church spreads across an area of over 300,000 square feet and according to the Guinness World Records is the world’s biggest basilica. The dome is an impressive 500-feet-tall and the interior can accommodate some 18,000 worshippers at one time. Making it more dramatic is the fact that is rises up in the middle of a desolate and dusty landscape on the outskirts of the nation’s capital city, Yamoussoukro.

The Beaches

Credit: Roman Yanushevsky/Shutterstock

Pack your bathing suit because there’s a 320-mile-long coastline to explore along the shores of the Gulf of Guinea. The beach at artsy Grand Bassam is a stunning combination of white sand and swaying palm trees while easy-going Assinie is the place for swimming and surfing. Monogaga Beach boasts clean, crystalline waters, food shacks and live music. San Pédro blends low-key beach life with rainforests treks and Sassandra is a treasure trove of secluded fishing villages, decaying mansions and hippo-inhabited rivers.

The National Parks

Credit: Jake Brooker/Shutterstock

Burnt orange roads take you away from the cities to the country’s eight national parks, where boundless opportunities for trekking and wildlife watching await. Explore one of the last-surviving primary rainforests of west Africa, spot nut-cracker chimpanzees and see pygmy hippos in Tai National Park. The grasslands, rainforest and savannah of Comoé National Park provide a natural habitat for chimps, dwarf crocodiles and exotic bird species. Get up close with buffalos, elephants and mongoose in Marahoué National Park. Don’t miss a tour of the lagoon islands and beaches of Iles Ehotile National Park.

The Food

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Like its neighboring countries, Ivorian cuisine has its roots in grains, fresh fruits and vegetables, chicken, pig and seafood. Mouthwatering dishes to try include kedjenou (spicy slow-cooked chicken or guinea fowl stew) and attiéké (cassava ground into a couscous-like consistency). Feast on aloko (fried bananas) and fufu (boiled cassava and plantain). Be sure to stop at a maquis, which are traditional street side restaurants for quick snacks and meals. Garba is the king of street food, a combination of attiéké and tuna often served wrapped in a banana leaf.

The Festivals

Credit: Mustapha GUNNOUNI/Shutterstock

Music flows freely through the veins of Ivorians and they grasp every chance to express themselves through song and dance. November’s Fêtes des Masques tops the bill of the annual festivals and is a celebration of the Dogon culture in the villages around the city of Man. Festival goers dress up in flamboyant masks and costumes and dance to honor the spirits of the forests. Head to Bouaké in March for the week-long Bouaké Carnival. In Gomon in April, the Fête du Dipri brings the community together for drumming and parades that exorcise evil spirits.

Ghana: History And Current Conditions

(This article is courtesy of Wikipedia)

Ghana (Listeni/ˈɡɑːnə/), officially the Republic of Ghana, is a sovereign unitary presidential constitutional democracy, located along the Gulf of Guinea and Atlantic Ocean, in the subregion of West Africa. Spanning a land mass of 238,535 km2, Ghana is bordered by the Ivory Coast in the west, Burkina Faso in the north, Togo in the east and the Gulf of Guinea and Atlantic Ocean in the south. The word Ghana means “Warrior King” in the Soninke language.[10]

The territory of present-day Ghana has been inhabited for millennia, with the first permanent state dating back to the 11th century. Numerous kingdoms and empires emerged over the centuries, of which the most powerful was the Kingdom of Ashanti.[11] Beginning in the 15th century, numerous European powers contested the area for trading rights, with the British ultimately establishing control of the coast by the late 19th century. Following over a century of native resistance, Ghana’s current borders were established by the 1900s as the British Gold Coast. In 1957, it became the first Sub-Saharan African nation to declare independence from European colonization.[12][13][14]

A multicultural nation, Ghana has a population of approximately 27 million, spanning a variety of ethnic, linguistic and religious groups.[5] Five percent of the population practices traditional faiths, 71.2% adhere to Christianity and 17.6% are Muslim. Its diverse geography and ecology ranges from coastal savanna’s to tropical jungles. Ghana is a democratic country led by a president who is both head of state and head of the government. Ghana’s economy is one of the strongest and most diversified in Africa, following a quarter century of relative stability and good governance.[15] Ghana’s growing economic prosperity and democratic political system has made it a regional power in West Africa.[16] It is a member of the Non-Aligned Movement, the African Union, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Group of 24 (G24).[17]

Ghana: History And Current Conditions

(This article is courtesy of Wikipedia)

Ghana (Listeni/ˈɡɑːnə/), officially the Republic of Ghana, is a sovereign unitary presidential constitutional democracy, located along the Gulf of Guinea and Atlantic Ocean, in the subregion of West Africa. Spanning a land mass of 238,535 km2, Ghana is bordered by the Ivory Coast in the west, Burkina Faso in the north, Togo in the east and the Gulf of Guinea and Atlantic Ocean in the south. The word Ghana means “Warrior King” in the Soninke language.[10]

The territory of present-day Ghana has been inhabited for millennia, with the first permanent state dating back to the 11th century. Numerous kingdoms and empires emerged over the centuries, of which the most powerful was the Kingdom of Ashanti.[11] Beginning in the 15th century, numerous European powers contested the area for trading rights, with the British ultimately establishing control of the coast by the late 19th century. Following over a century of native resistance, Ghana’s current borders were established by the 1900s as the British Gold Coast. In 1957, it became the first Sub-Saharan African nation to declare independence from European colonization.[12][13][14]

A multicultural nation, Ghana has a population of approximately 27 million, spanning a variety of ethnic, linguistic and religious groups.[5] Five percent of the population practices traditional faiths, 71.2% adhere to Christianity and 17.6% are Muslim. Its diverse geography and ecology ranges from coastal savanna’s to tropical jungles. Ghana is a democratic country led by a president who is both head of state and head of the government. Ghana’s economy is one of the strongest and most diversified in Africa, following a quarter century of relative stability and good governance.[15] Ghana’s growing economic prosperity and democratic political system has made it a regional power in West Africa.[16] It is a member of the Non-Aligned Movement, the African Union, the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the Group of 24 (G24).[17]