(Our Future/Poem) Green Paper Adios, Hello Computer Chip

GREEN PAPER ADIOS, HELLO COMPUTER CHIP

 

Green Paper is the bread of life these days

Example: Farm living is not a life that’s easy of free

Land, every acre cost so high, worth it to see the Stars

Cities traffic, years in your seat and fumes in your eyes

 

Do not pretend that the poor in NYC can actually afford the price to live

In the country seldom do you pay a penthouse price for a cup of tea

For some to love you these days, depends on the value of the fleece

Love should not be conditional upon buying Boardwalk and Park Place

 

The cost of life, chasing the Green Paper the cost is oh so high

No one these days willing to sacrifice like the love of a Farmers Wife

Get up before the Sun, work the fields till dark, then the house work begins

Green Paper makes us like Mice in a game, if you are breathing you play

 

Remove the Green Paper for the convenience of a painless little Chip

What could be safer for all of our personal life, all our info on a Chip

Identity theft, forgery, counterfeiting, immigration problem now solved

Green Paper worthless, now the age of the Chip, can you feel your death

 

Was it all a dream, did we the people really just give up without a fight

One World Order, do you ever ponder whether Good and Evil really exist

Is there really some among us who would truly forgo their given time

Green Paper, Computer Chips, Friends, are they the future of our daily life

 

Forced Out: When Leaving the Country Means Leaving Your Kids Behind

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF KQED NEWS)

 

Forced Out: When Leaving the Country Means Leaving Your Kids

Maria Mendoza-Sanchez, a Highland Hospital nurse in Oakland, and her husband this week ended their fight to remain in the U.S. after federal immigration authorities denied a last-ditch plea to stay.

Maria, her husband Eusebio Sanchez, and their 12-year-old son, Jesus, boarded a flight at San Francisco International Airport for Mexico City less than an hour before a federal deportation order expired late Wednesday for the couple — leaving behind their three daughters, two of them adults and one a teenager.

Maria Mendoza-Sanchez sits on a couch in her Oakland home on Aug. 16, 2017, hours before she, her husband and son leave Oakland for Mexico City. Her daughter, Melin Sanchez, 21, cries as she watches her mother with concern. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

Sanchez spent her last day in the U.S. doing somewhat routine things: She took her daughter, Elizabeth, 16, to her first day of school as a sophomore and she went to the bank.

But she did some out-of-the-ordinary things, too: She granted power of attorney to her eldest daughter, Vianney, 23. She packed her belongings. And she put her nursing uniforms into a storage box.

“I’m sorry I won’t be there to serve them anymore,” she said of her patients in the oncology and cardiology unit of Highland Hospital, Alameda County’s trauma center. “But one day I will be back, that’s for sure.”

Eusebio Sanchez supports his wife, Maria Mendoza-Sanchez, in their Oakland home on Aug. 16, 2017, hours before they leave for Mexico City after federal immigration authorities denied their request for a reprieve. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

The couple came to the U.S. more than 20 years ago, settling in Oakland in 1994. Maria graduated from Holy Names University with a nursing degree while raising their children. Eusebio worked in construction and eventually became a truck driver.

The couple have no criminal records, and have been undocumented during their time in the U.S. Vianney is protected under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, while their three younger kids are U.S. citizens.

“Fighting an immigration case when you are a Mexican is really three times as difficult as it is other communities,” Maria said as she tried to hold back tears. “It doesn’t matter how hard you work. It doesn’t matter what you do.”

Melin Sanchez, 21, cries as she hugs a neighbor who lives across the street. People drop by the Oakland home on Aug. 16, 2017, hours before Melin’s mother and father leave for Mexico City after federal immigration authorities rejected their last-ditch appeal to stay. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

Under the Obama administration, the couple received two stays, along with legal work visas, to remain in the U.S. But when they applied for another stay in May 2017, federal immigration officials limited it to 90 days — after which they would be deported.

The family was hoping for a reprieve with the help of Sen. Dianne Feinstein. But on Tuesday afternoon, Feinstein called to tell them that federal immigration agents had denied their request for another stay, the senator’s office said.

“All possible avenues to delay their departure have been denied by the Trump administration in what I believe is an act utterly devoid of humanity,” Feinstein said in a statement. “This is a travesty, plain and simple, and evidence that Donald Trump’s immigration ‎policy is nothing more than a hateful deportation program targeting law-abiding families. It’s shameful and stands against the very ideals upon which this country was founded.”

Melin Sanchez, right, is comforted by a friend as they listen to Sanchez’s mother, Maria Mendoza-Sanchez, talk to the press hours before she, her husband and their son leave for Mexico City on Aug. 16, 2017. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

In a statement to KQED from  Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Western Region, the agency confirmed the denial. But ICE added that it gave the couple enough time “to get their personal affairs in order and make preparations for their departure.”

Sanchez said she and her husband prepared their three daughters for life without them in the U.S.: Vianney, a graduate of UC Santa Cruz, will be the legal guardian of Elizabeth as she finishes high school. Their middle daughter, Melin, 21, will stay to finish her last year at UC Santa Cruz.

In Maria’s last hours before flying to Mexico City, Elizabeth came home from her first day of school. She sat on the couch next to her mom and rested her head on her mom’s shoulder.

The two discussed her first day of school — knowing moments like these were coming to an end.

Maria said she also had a conversation with her kids that a parent doesn’t ever think they’ll have.

“Yes, indeed, you separate from your parents but you don’t have to worry about rent, you don’t have to worry about food, and then you’ll be able to finish school,” she recalled telling her daughters.

Luggage for Maria Mendoza-Sanchez, her husband Eusebio, and their 12-year-old son, Jesus, stacked near the door of their Oakland home on Aug. 16, 2017. They left for Mexico City late Wednesday after living in the U.S. for more than 20 years. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

Though she is having to leave, Sanchez said what she’s taking with her to Mexico — her memories — no one can take away.

“Because it’s in my heart and it’s in my mind,” she said.

Photos of the Sanchez family and a sign about nursing decorate a shelf in their home in Oakland on Aug. 16, 2017. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

Erdogan Says Turkey May Hold Referendum On EU Accession Bid

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF REUTERS NEWS AGENCY) 

Erdogan says Turkey may hold referendum on EU accession bid

President Tayyip Erdogan said on Saturday that Turkey may hold a second referendum on whether to continue with European Union accession talks following a planned vote on April 16 that could give him sweeping new powers.

“Right now we are holding a referendum on April 16 and after that we could choose to do a second one on the (EU) accession talks and we would abide by whatever our people would say there,” Erdogan told a forum in the southern city of Antalya.

Turkey began EU accession talks in 2005 but they have moved very slowly due to disagreements over Cyprus, human rights and other issues. Relations between Ankara and Brussels have become particularly strained in recent months.

(Reporting by Humeyra Pamuk; Editing by Gareth Jones)

French President Hollande Says French Values Must Be Defended In Cold War Climate

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF BLOOMBERG NEWS)

Hollande Says France Must Defend Values in Cold War Climate

December 31, 2016, 3:03 PM EST
  • Outgoing French president sees democracy, freedom at risk
  • Final New Year’s address targets National Front’s Le Pen

French President Francois Hollande tells the French they have values to defend in the context of a new Cold War — a reference to both geopolitics and the country’s looming presidential election.

“There are moments in history when everything can be toppled. We are living through one of those periods,” Hollande said in a televised speech from Paris. “Democracy, freedom, Europe and even peace — all of these things have become vulnerable, reversible. We saw it with Brexit and with the U.S. election in November.”

Hollande, who came to power in May 2012, bowed out of France’s 2017 presidential race earlier this month, meaning today’s New Year’s eve address to the nation will be his last as head of state. The Socialist leader insisted to French voters that they have a responsibility on the global stage when they cast their ballots.

“France is open to the world, it is European,” Hollande said. “It is not possible to imagine our country crouching behind walls, reduced to its domestic self, returning to a national currency and increasingly discriminating based on peoples’ origins. It would no longer be France. That is what is at stake.”

Those remarks directly targeted the policies of National Front leader Marine Le Pen, who is committed to pulling France out of the euro, increasing restrictions on immigration, as well as putting up tariff barriers.

“Our main enemy is our doubt. You must have confidence in yourselves,” Hollande said.

Before it’s here, it’s on the Bloomberg Terminal.

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Trump vows to ‘stop dead’ Mideast immigration: ‘We have no idea who they are’

President-elect tells Ohio supporters he will ‘keep America safe,’ prefer ‘stability, not chaos’ in foreign policy, ‘because we want to rebuild our country’

Source: Trump vows to ‘stop dead’ Mideast immigration: ‘We have no idea who they are’

Concern in China over 1,200 arrests in Philippines

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SHANGHAI DAILY NEWS PAPER)

Concern in China over 1,200 arrests in Philippines

CHINA is concerned over the detention of more than 1,000 Chinese nationals in the Philippines during a crackdown on online gambling, the Foreign Ministry said yesterday.

The Philippine immigration bureau last week detained about 1,200 Chinese people working in call center-like facilities who were suspected of running online gambling operations out of a former American air base, Clark Field.

The detentions marked the government’s biggest such round-up of Chinese nationals in the Philippines, many thought to be working there “illegally.”

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said Beijing had requested that Manila “appropriately make arrangements” for those who had been detained and quickly release individuals who had “legal identification.”

“At the same time, China expresses concern over the large number of Chinese citizens detained by the Philippines,” Geng told a regular press briefing.

Geng added that China always reminded its citizens who traveled abroad to abide by local laws.

It is unclear if the Chinese nationals were being held for gambling offences or for visa and immigration violations, but about 900 were brought to the immigration detention center in Manila, according to a Philippine police report.

China has expressed support for other law enforcement efforts in the Philippines, including President Rodrigo Duterte’s anti-narcotics campaign, which has sparked criticism from the United States and other Western countries over fears of “extrajudicial killings.”

(Philosophy/Poem) THE WALL

The Wall—-First published here on 4-5-14

 

Why do we build, to keep out?

Was not Berlin’s built to keep in?

The Great Wall of China can be seen from space.

Decide what is real

Your reflection in the world’s looking glass

Does it show but one face?

 

Division from the south, but not from the north.

Do you not see your two faces shining?

What do you think your wall will facilitate?

 

The poor of the south,

Hungry, tired, and scared, they come to your gates

Looking for a safe place to build, and work and pray.

We build a higher wall

We tell them they have to wait.

 

From terrorist and drugs, you say your wall will defend.

You wall out your brother, your neighbor, your friends.

How is it you can be so cold?

Do you not know, nor see, nor care

That by your actions you do offend?

 

Do you not think that a terrorist or a drug King Pin

Can enter your haven from the cold frozen north?

Do not speak to me of family values

As children and mothers die of hunger

At the foot of this wall you create.