Exactly What To Say If Someone Takes Credit For Your Work

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THRIVE GLOBAL)

 

Exactly What to Say If Someone Takes Credit for Your Work

Maybe your co-worker didn’t mean to pawn off your work as their own — or maybe they did — either way, here’s how to correct the record.
Credit: La1n/Shutterstock/Thrive
Credit: La1n/Shutterstock/Thrive

When you work hard on a project that you’re proud of, it’s uniquely frustrating (and stressful) when someone else on your team gets the credit. That’s especially true for women, whose accomplishments are all too often overshadowed (or absorbed) by those of their male colleagues.

Research out of the University of Delaware found that men are given more credit than women for saying exactly the same thing. There’s even a term for it: “hepeating.”  And when women have to share credit, they’re usually short-shrifted: A Harvard study in 2017 looked at 500 tenure decisions over a period of four decades and discovered that women who co-authored most of their academic papers got tenure 50 percent less of the time than their male counterparts.

Amy Gallo, a contributing editor at the Harvard Business Review and author of HBR Guide to Dealing with Conflict, urges us to challenge credit-stealers, especially when bias is involved. “Given that research shows women are less likely to get credit, when a man gets credit for the work a woman has done, it’s extremely important to speak up,” she tells Thrive Global.

While it may feel awkward to call someone out for pawning your ideas off as their own, Gallo offers solutions to gracefully set the record straight — compassionately and directly — without damaging your relationships.

Steady your emotions

Whether it was intentional or accidental. when someone takes off with your idea, it can feel blood-boiling. But simmer down a bit before you approach your offender. “We don’t make rational choices when we’re angry or upset,” Gallo points out. Once you regain your cool, concretely outline what you contributed and what was miscast as someone else’s accomplishment. You need to be clear in your own mind about what exactly you’re upset about before you can have a productive conversation.

Create an open dialogue

Don’t be accusatory. It’s possible someone genuinely isn’t aware that the concept they’ve cast as their own originated with you. A ton of ideas are typically exchanged throughout the day in meeting after meeting, and it’s easy to jumble things up in your head. You might even broach the subject with your colleague by prefacing it with, “We ideate so much, so I know you may have forgotten, but I actually originated that idea you presented in today’s meeting.”

If your boss is a chronic thief, focus the discussion on your concerns around how not being able to sign your name to the bulk of your output will thwart your career growth, rather than assigning them malicious intent. “It’s important to remember that it is your job to make your boss look good, which is mutually beneficial,” Gallo says. Sometimes it’ll behoove you to let small swipes go.

Find an ally to rally for you

Seek someone out, preferably in a position of power, to speak up on your behalf, Gallo recommends. Having a colleague highlight your work will help you reinforce an ethos of giving proper credit, which helps promote an honest and direct workplace.

When all else fails

Sometimes a head-on collision (looping in HR) is necessary when you’re getting repeatedly ripped off. But before you escalate, make sure you have a paper trail that supports your assertion that you’re the real architect of the work at hand.

To protect yourself from credit-stealers, Gallo recommends creating visibility of your efforts along the way. “Really document what role you’re playing by sending weekly updates to your boss outlining exactly what you’re doing,” she says. That’ll make it much harder for someone to take credit for your work.

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Trump: Dangerous Idiot—President Mike Pence: Dangerous Hypocrite? #2 Of 2

President Mike Pence: Dangerous Hypocrite?

(Part 2 Of 2)

 

On August 6th I wrote an article titled ” If Our President is Found Guilty Of Treason: Then What” That article is part one of this two-part letter to you. As a lot of you know, that by our Constitution the answer to that question is, the Vice President, Mike Pence becomes the President. Many folks that are hooked to this blog as well as people that I personally know have told me that in their opinion Mike Pence is more dangerous than Donald Trump. Personally I have though that these folks couldn’t be right, could they? So, I started digging for more information on our possible next President, for your knowledge, and for mine. The rest of this letter to you is information that I have gleamed off of various news agencies, I will document them for you as I go along.

 

Source: Market Watch

In 1998 when Mike Pence was a radio host in Indiana he argued that a President could be removed from office on “Moral grounds” when he was referring to President Bill Clinton and Monica Lewinsky. Now that he is Donald Trump’s Vice President he has changed his opinion on this matter. There is no way that Mr. Pence can say that he was unaware of Mr. Trumps morals when he was asked to be Trumps running mate. Politics and big dollars make many folks change their religious ideologies, it looks like Mr. Pence is one of those folks.

During this time that he was a radio host Mr. Pence said that a President needed to be held to a higher moral standard than “our next door neighbor.” He argued that the ‘First Family’ must be role models for the rest of the country and the world.

 

Source: The New Republic

 

Their headline was “Is Mike Pence Really A Hypocrite?”

 

Mr. Pence detailed how President Clinton had broken the law by lying to the Grand Jury which is Perjury and Perjury is a Felony in the U.S. Legal System. He said that Presidents that commit perjury should resign or be impeached.

 

Source: The Business Insider 

 

10 Things we should know about Mike Pence’s political views and his religious beliefs. You may agree with some of his thoughts just as I did agree with a couple of his views from a Biblical view-point. Then again, you may agree with or disagree with all of them, I did not cherry pick the information given in an attempt to swing an opinion in either direction.

1.) Pence didn’t want women in the military. In 1999 a woman in the military fell in love with another soldier and he used this as his basis for his view-point.

2.) In 2000 Mr. Pence wrote an op-ed in which he said “smoking doesn’t kill”. He said this as he was taking money from big tobacco companies for his Congressional campaign. In 2016 during the Presidential Campaign he reworded his view-point to “smoking isn’t good for you.”

3.) While running for Congress in 2000 Mr. Pence wrote on his website that money funding research for HIV/AIDS should be moved to fund ‘Conversion Therapy” “Which provide assistance to those seeking to change their sexual behavior.”

4.) Mr. Pence told ‘The Hill Newspaper’ in 2002 that he never eats alone with a woman other than his wife and that he doesn’t attend events that serve alcohol without her. He has been blasted in some circles for being unfair to women, excluding them from important meetings saying that he is anti women because of this ‘moral’ policy. Personally I Agree with this policy from a religion stand point and from an ‘I love my wife’ stand point, but that is just me and my being old-fashioned.

 

Sources: The Hill Newspaper and the Washington Post

 

5.) During his 12 years as a Congressman Mr. Pence co-sponsored multiple pieces of legislation for a “Federal Shield Law” which would have allowed reporters to keep confidential sources secret, even if the government requested those sources. Now, as Donald Trumps VP he is against this legislation.

Source: The Washington Post

 

6.) Mr. Pence in 2006 cited a Harvard researcher in remarks where he declared that same-sex marriages would bring about a “social collapse” in America.

Source: Mic and the New York Times

 

7.) In 2011 Congressman Pence authored a bill to completely defund Planned Parenthood and he signaled that he was willing to prompt a government shut down in order to pass this bill.

8.) In a bid to limit abortions, Mr. Pence in 2011 sought to change when Federal funds for abortions could be used. The current stature was applied in cases of rape or incest. Mr. Pence wanted to change the term “rape” to “force-able rape.” Folks, I have a question for you, when is “rape” not force-able? If rape is not forced upon a person then isn’t it considered to be consensual sex?

Source: Mic and the Huffington Post

 

9.) While Governor of Indiana Mr. Pence signed the “2015 Religious Freedom Restoration Act” which was meant to allow businesses in the state of Indiana to cite religious beliefs as a reason to refuse services to members of the LGBTQ community.

Source: the Huffington Post

 

10.) While Governor of Indiana Mr. Pence was blamed for a HIV crisis in his State after he moved to slash funding for Planned Parent-hood in 2011. A local Planed Parent-hood facility had to close in 2013 because of the spending cut. That facility was the only HIV testing center in Scott County which faced a deepening drug use problem that was believed to have hastened HIV out breaks.

Source: The New Yorker and former top adviser to President Trump, Stephen Bannon

 

“The danger of having a President Pence, Trumps critics yearn for his exit, but, Mike Pence is the ultimate Corporate Inside Man who poses his own risks.”

Bannon: “Pence is the outreach guy, the connective tissue between the Trump Administration and the most conservative wing of the Republican establishment.” Mr. Bannon also says that “Mr. Pence would be a President that the Koch brothers would own.” “Pence’s political career through-out has been sponsored at almost every turn by the same donors whom Trump has assailed. Pence is the inside man of the conservative money machine.”

 

“On Election Night of 2016 at the Hilton Hotel in Mid-town Manhattan in an upstairs Suite above the Ball-room there was an even more VIP that existed. Doug Deacon, a Texas businessman and a political donor told me that ‘it was amazing.’ In the VIP reception area alone I counted at least 8 or 9 billionaires.” Deacon said “he’s (Pence) really the contact to the big donors. Deacon said, that since the election I have attended two dinners for the wealthy backers at the Vice-Presidential residence. If Pence were to become President, the Government would be run by the Koch brothers-period. Pence has been their tool for years.”

 

Source: Doug Deacon

I had a meeting with Mikes mother (Nancy Pence Fritsch) and she said to me “the family identifies as Catholic, and Mike was an Alter-boy. Religion is the most important thing in our lives, she said.” “But we don’t take it seriously.”

Source: Gregory Pence, Mike’s brother

 

In Mikes Congressional Campaign he used personal donations toward personal expenses such as his mortgage and groceries. This wasn’t illegal, but it violated the trust of his supporters and sullied his “Pious” image. He upset a lot of his backers. It was partly because of immaturity, but he really was kind of full of shit. He comes across as Mid-western nice, but he is mean and shallow.”

 

In 1999 Mr. Pence took a job offer as President of the Indiana Policy Review Foundation, a tiny new ‘think tank’ that promoted free-market policies. They were known for being anti-union. They also opposed health, safety and environmental regulations. Also, because he was taking campaign contributions from big tobacco companies Mr. Pence said in 2000 that smoking doesn’t kill people. He said that a greater scourge than cigarettes was “big government disguised as do-gooder, healthcare rhetoric.”

Mr. Pence served in the Congress for 12 years yet he never, not once, authored a single successful bill. He was against George W. Bush’s expansion of Medicaid coverage for prescription drugs and the “no child left behind” program. Once Barack Obama was elected President Pence he became the early voice of the ‘Tea Party.”

Pence sponsored an unsuccessful amendment to the Affordable Care Act (Obama Care) that would have made it legal for government-funded hospitals to turn away a dying woman who needed an abortion to stay alive.

Pence calls “Global Warming” a myth. He may well feel this way because the Koch Brothers own several coal-fired power plants and oil refineries which release some 24 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere each year. He voted against putting a tax on company’s carbon emissions. Carbon dioxide is said by most scientist to be the biggest reason for global warming. This tax would have cost the Koch brothers millions of dollars each year. It was after this bill failed to pass in the Senate that Mr. Pence became the “Koch’s guy” and they have been showering him with money ever since.

Source: Matthew Tully, a Columnist at the Indianapolis Star said 

“that Pence has a fatal flaw, he is to political and ideological, his focus is always on the next step up, not on his job at hand.

Pence brags about how good the state of Indiana was doing for the people financially yet when he left office Indiana ranked 38th in individual income.

Source: Michael Maurer, the owner of the Indianapolis Business Journal who is a Republican said in reference to Pence 

“It, his hypocrisy, just exploded in his face. His poll numbers were terrible. I bet he’d never get elected in Indiana again. But he went from being a likely loser as an incumbent governor to the V.P. of the U.S. but Indiana is still reeling from having him as our governor.”

Well folks, I think I now know a good bit more about why people from Indiana have been telling me how dangerous Mike Pence would be as our next President. I now see why so many people call him a hypocrite, a fraud, and dangerous. Most of the time I have associated the word hypocrite with something to religion yet in reality I associate it with a person who says one thing and does another. To me, a person who claims to be a Christian who worships money and human power over others, which also means they are also lying, is the worse kind of hypocrite and it appears to me that this definition fits Mike Pence quite well. Think back to the statement of his Mother about religion and I quote “religion is the most important thing in our lives, but we don’t take it seriously!” Just think about that statement, the most important thing in your life, but you don’t take that most important thing seriously, whew, what a ringing endorsement for the quality of a person, and by his Mother no less.

 

 

 

How to get a world-class education for free on the internet

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF QUARTZ ALIVE)

 

How to get a world-class education for free on the internet

As crucial as a university degree has become for working in the modern economy, it is not the only route forward into a wildly lucrative and satisfying career—just ask famous dropouts Bill Gates, Oprah Winfrey, Michael Dell, Steve Jobs, Mark Zuckerberg.

In the future, a single bachelor’s degree in a particular subject will no longer suffice for many of us anyway. As robots and automation sweep the global workforce, hundreds of millions of people—the majority of whom do not have the time or money to go pick up a brand-new four-year degree—will have to “re-skill” in order to land new jobs. The question that employees and employers alike face is how to get that done quickly, efficiently, and, most importantly to many, cheaply.

The internet, luckily, is already a booming resource. Whether you find yourself seeking new employment mid-career, curious about alternatives to a college education, or simply are interested in learning for learning’s sake, Quartz At Work has compiled some of the most dependable, high-quality materials you can access to learn anything on the internet.

For a free liberal arts education:

The first name in online course catalogs is Coursera, a juggernaut because of its pioneering of massive open online courses (MOOCs). Started in 2012, Coursera now has over 28 million users and over 2,000 courses—which can either be taken for free or for a small fee to earn an official certificate—from leading institutions like Harvard and Stanford.

In recent years, the catalog has expanded far beyond traditional subjects like history and mathematics. “There’s been a lot of interest in courses that are more about personal and professional development—you’ll see courses on how to learn, how to reason, how to find happiness and fulfillment, as well as courses that are more skills-oriented,” Coursera co-founder Daphne Koller told Quartz in 2016.

The platform’s most popular classes include:

There are several other MOOC providers, including Udacity and edX. Udacity tends to be a better resource for professionals looking to develop certain vocational skills, and edX—created by MIT and Harvard—is more of a zany academic platform with a special focus on science, but both have large, comprehensive catalogs and easily searchable databases.

For specific professional skills, there’s also Alison, another online course provider, which works with big publishers like Google and Macmillan to provide training in areas like customer service, project management, and human resources.

If your aim is purely to soak in all the knowledge under the sun, you might also give Khan Academy a try. The site is lauded for its streamlined, expert-driven content in the form of short YouTube videos that are quick to absorb and do not necessarily comprise an entire course.

And if you’re interested in learning from professors at a specific institution, run a search for whether the school has an open learning program. Harvard Extension’s Open Learning Initiative, Carnegie Mellon’s Open Learning Initiative, MIT OpenCourseWare, and Open Yale Courses are all examples—and there are more coming out every year—of elite universities publicizing their most popular classes. (Quartz has a list of some of the newest.)

For learning a new language:

Many smartphone users are already familiar with Duolingo, which has emerged in recent years as a major language-learning program, beating out the likes of Rosetta Stone and other established companies for sheer efficiency. And, of course, cheapness.

Duolingo, which has about 200 million registered users around the world, currently offers 68 different language courses across 23 languages, with 22 more courses in development. It operates a “freemium” model (think Spotify) which allows users to access the bulk of the app for free, and pay for certain additional features. Its genius lies primarily in its design, which has been praised as revolutionary and intuitive: Lessons integrate text translation, visuals, speaking, and sound into a comprehensive learning environment.

For the euphoria of fiction:

Reading, the most wonderful of leisurely pursuits, need not be costly at all. Start at Project Gutenberg, which offers over 56,000 free e-books. Open Library, a project of Internet Archive that is trying to catalog every book in existence, also offers plenty of free books.

Join your local public library—or any public library—that offers OverDrive, an app that lets users borrow from a comprehensive catalog of free ebooks and audiobooks. Libby is another app that offers the same functionality with a better interface.

Google Books has abandoned its once-lofty plans to digitize the world’s books, but it has a “free ebooks” feature you can toggle and is a useful site for academic texts or some more modern titles.

Quartz has a complete guide to finding specific titles online. (If you’re a book novice, unsure of where to start, you might also take a look at Quartz’s guide to enjoying classic literature.)

For the nitty-gritty of coding:

Coding is one of the best skills to learn online—the work itself takes place entirely on a computer—but the quality of free teaching available ranges from expert-level to deeply flawed. Programmers tend to agree, though, that Codecademy, Free Code Camp, and HackerRank are all consistently well-designed and useful resources.

Codecademy gently coaches novice coders through the basics of HTML and CSS, and into JavaScript and more complicated languages; Free Code Camp does the same with an added emphasis on building real-world projects for nonprofits. HackerRank offers code “challenges”—mini puzzles that are attention-engaging and educational without being explicitly instructive, providing a “learn by doing” approach that is ideal for people who prefer projects to lectures. If none of these three appeal, try this list of 49 vetted resources.

For a jumpstart on the hard-to-grasp:

Onerous is the idea of trying to learn more about the physical world without a good starting-off point. The following free resources, some of which live on a few of the open platforms mentioned above, offer a mix of interactive materials, quizzes, and videos, and are excellent inspiration for anyone interested in working in—or simply learning about—the sciences.

For a hefty dose of motivation:

TED Talks are hardly a secret resource; you can easily find talks from stars in every industry from technology to agriculture. Another source of inspiration is MasterClass, which is not free—the current rate is $180/year—but hosts a number of well-made videos led by celebrities. Judd Apatow can teach you comedy, Gordon Ramsay offers wisdom on cooking, and Diane von Furstenberg will share her tips for building a fashion brand.

With these kinds of classes, the delivery platform is not as important so much as the idea of being inspired continually, by idols, icons, experts, or anyone that you feel can lead you to where you want to go, so that you maintain your energy and stay enthusiastic about the world around you.

MasterClass CEO David Rogier says, “Schools teach you the underlying skills of what to learn, but now in the changing world it’s the default to change ourselves and continue to learn.” Thanks to the internet, that’s easier than ever.

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Why Carter G. Woodson Is the ‘Father of Black History’

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME NEWS)

 

Google
Google

By ALANA ABRAMSON

Updated: February 1, 2018 11:24 AM ET

February is Black History Month, and Google is kicking it off by honoring Carter G. Woodson, frequently touted as the “Father of Black History,” with a Google Doodle.

Carter Godwin Woodson was born in 1875 to former slaves and, as the second African-American to earn a doctorate from Harvard, become one of the first scholars of African-American history. Woodson died in 1950.

Illustrator Shannon Wright designed the Google Doodle in conjunction with the Black Googlers network.

“Woodson was committed to bringing African-American history front and center and ensuring it was taught in schools and studied by other scholars,” Sherice Torres, Director of Brand Marketing at Google and member of the network, explained in a post about the Google Doodle. Torres explained that Woodson served as her inspiration when she said she wanted to attend Harvard and was discouraged by people around her.

Portrait of American historian and educator Carter Godwin Woodson (1875 - 1950), 1910s. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Portrait of American historian and educator Carter Godwin Woodson (1875 – 1950), 1910s. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Hulton Archive—Getty Images

Here’s What Else You Should Know About Carter Woodson:

  • Woodson was unable to attend school for much of his childhood because he had to help his parents financially. He ended up entering high school at the age of 20, and received his diploma in two years.
  • After high school,Woodson taught in West Virginia before earning his undergraduate degree at Berea College. He received a masters degree from the University of Chicago in 1908, and a doctorate of History from Harvard in 1912.
  • In between teaching and receiving his masters and doctorate, Woodson was a school supervisor in the Philippines.
  • Woodson founded “Negro History Week,” which preceded Black History Month.

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Republican Health-Care Plan Eliminates Mental Health And Drug Addiction Provisions

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON POST)

By Katie Zezima and Chris Ingraham

The Republican proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act would strip away what advocates say is essential coverage for drug addiction treatment as the number of people dying from opiate overdoses is skyrocketing nationwide.

Beginning in 2020, the plan would eliminate an Affordable Care Act requirement that Medicaid cover basic mental-health and addiction services in states that expanded it, allowing them to decide whether to include those benefits in Medicaid plans.

The proposal would also roll back the Medicaid expansion under the act — commonly known as Obamacare — which would affect many states bearing the brunt of the opiate crisis, including Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia. Thirty-one states and the District of Columbia expanded Medicaid under the ACA.

“Taken as a whole, it is a major retreat from the effort to save lives in the opiate epidemic,” said Joshua Sharfstein, associate dean at Johns Hopkins Medical School.
Advocates and others stress that mental-health disorders sometimes fuel drug addiction, making both benefits essential to combating the opioid crisis.

Nearly 1.3 million people receive treatment for mental-health and substance abuse disorders under the Medicaid expansion, according to an estimate by health care economists Richard G. Frank of the Harvard Medical School and Sherry Glied of New York University.

House Republicans confirmed the benefit cuts during a meeting of the House Energy and Commerce Committee on Wednesday. Republicans on the committee argue that the change would give states additional flexibility in coverage decisions, and believe they would continue to provide addiction and mental-health coverage to Medicaid recipients if needed.

During the committee meeting, Rep. Joe Kennedy (D-Mass.) asked a GOP staffer whether those benefits are “no longer essentially covered, or required to be covered, by this version of this text. Is that not correct?”

“The text before us does remove the application of the essential health benefits for the alternative benefit plans in Medicaid,” a lawyer for Republicans on the committee responded.

“Including mental health?”

“Yes.”

Rep. Joe Kennedy (D-Mass.) said he and Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.) introduced an amendment during the committee meeting to include mandates for substance abuse and mental-health coverage, but it was voted down along party lines.

Several Republican senators expressed concern about removing the benefits. Sens. Rob Portman (Ohio), Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.), Cory Gardner (Colo.) and Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) sent a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) stating that the plan does not “provide stability and certainty” for individuals and families enrolled in Medicaid expansion programs, or flexibility for states.

President Trump has made combating the nation’s drug-overdose problem a focal point of his campaign and his presidency.
“We will stop the drugs from pouring into our country and poisoning our youth,” he said in a speech before Congress last week, “and we will expand treatment for those who have become so badly addicted.”

Trump has endorsed the Republican plan to replace the ACA.

“States have already been strong leaders on the opioid crisis and know the crisis within their states better than the federal government,” said a White House spokesman who was not authorized to comment and spoke on the condition of anonymity. “We expect them to prioritize the needs in their states better than the federal government ever could.”

A record number of people — 33,000 — died of opiate overdoses in 2015, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Opioids now kill more people than car accidents, and in 2015 the number of heroin deaths nationwide surpassed the number of deaths from gun-related homicides. Authorities are also grappling with an influx of powerful synthetic narcotics responsible for a sharp increase in overdoses and deaths over the past year.

The 15 counties with the highest death rates from opiate overdoses were in Kentucky and West Virginia, according to a group of public health researchers, writing in the New England Journal of Medicine. Both of those states expanded Medicaid. Taking away those benefits, they wrote, would affect tens of thousands of rural Americans “in the midst of an escalating epidemic.”

Medicaid pays for 49.5 percent of medication-assisted treatment in Ohio, 44.7 percent in West Virginia and 44 percent in Kentucky when the drug Buprenorphine, which is used to manage chronic opiate use disorder, is administered, according to Rebecca Farley, vice president of policy at the National Center on Behavioral Health.

Public health officials and advocates say there is a nationwide shortage of treatment programs to serve the growing problem of addiction and its effects, including diseases associated with long-term IV drug use such as hepatitis C and HIV.

Shawn Ryan, a doctor with Brightview Health in Cincinnati, which provides addiction treatment mainly to patients on Medicaid, said states are starting to increase drug addiction services to respond to rising needs, but the process could take years.

“The outpatient addiction treatment services that are starting to ramp up . . . they could be crushed by this if not done in a way that specifically protects the most vulnerable populations,” he said.

Stripping away addiction treatment services from low-income people is especially harmful, Frank, of Harvard, said in an interview, because the prevalence of drug abuse is much higher for people living well below the poverty line. He said Medicaid recipients who are covered for addiction treatment and maintain their coverage through 2020 would not lose the benefit under the GOP proposal. But, he added, because addiction is a chronic-relapse disease, people may get clean, relapse, stop working and need to go back on Medicaid.

“It’s a disease that hits suddenly at various points in the life cycle,” Frank said.

Some GOP lawmakers advocate a full repeal of the ACA, a move that would result in loss of coverage for 2.8 million people, 222,000 of whom have an opioid disorder, Frank and Glied, of NYU, estimate.

Gary Mendell, founder of the anti-addiction organization Shatterproof, said the group plans to run campaigns against the rollback in eight states were Medicaid was expanded, urging people to contact their elected officials. Mendell, whose son battled addiction and died in 2011, said the drug-abuse battle has transcended party lines. Last year, Congress passed a landmark bill to fight opiate addiction.

“It’s been a bipartisan effort to attack the opiate epidemic,” he said, “and now Republicans are putting fighting the opiate epidemic in the back seat to politics.”

Yom Kippur Haftorah: Black Lives Matter

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CHANDRA PRESCOD’S WEBSITE)

 
The opening chapter of a handwritten Book of Esther. source: Wikipedia

Yom Kippur Haftorah: Black Lives Matter

You shall love people — including Black people — with all your heart

I shared this with my synagogue during Yom Kippur 5777 Shacharit services.

To grow up Black in America is to know that your humanity is always in question.

I have a lot of memories of this from my childhood, but one stands out in particular.

When I was 15, I was thrown out of a New Year’s Eve party because Black people — or as they repeatedly shouted at me, N-words — were not welcome.

Later, when I was an 18-year-old college sophomore, a white Jewish leader of Harvard Hillel yelled at me that I was an anti-Semite because I was at a peace rally organized by Arab students. She could not imagine that someone my color was an Ashkenazi Jew too.

Now at 34, every time my mother calls me, I think it’s to tell me one of my cousins is dead. Or in jail. A couple of weeks ago a phone call from a cousin was in fact about another one who was in jail, falsely accused by a white person who wanted to teach her a lesson.

In 2016, I assume that every conversation with one of my Black friends and family members may be our last one. My friends and family are located close to the places where Black people have been the victims of extrajudicial police murders. Whenever I hear the news, I wait — in complete terror — for a name. And I have given instructions to my husband about what to do if it’s me.

I find too often that white Jews hear stories like this and think, “That’s sad for them. I will act in solidarity when I can.” As we think about making the world whole, about Teshuvah and our commitment to Tikkun Olam and respecting and loving G-d, the G-d that we make together, I believe this approach should be questioned.

Why? Because Black people are People. What is happening is an affront to all of us, not just those of us who are Black. It is time to stop treating this like it is a grief that only Black people can feel and understand, as if Blacks are somehow a different species.

In fact, it is hard to be Black and Jewish in a community that does not see how alienating this approach can be. I have thought many times, in the last two months especially, about walking away from Judaism because I did not feel fully acknowledged as a fellow human.

I don’t believe this outcome is fated though. Albert Einstein — my theoretical physics hero — said that racism is a disease of white people, and he included himself in this grouping. He didn’t write this during the Days of Awe, but I think it is a good framing of what matters during this time.

As we end the days of awe, I want my fellow Jews who are not Black to consider that repentance means in part to take responsibility and repair what you can.

Part of this repair in my view is recognizing that Black Lives, Native Lives, Latinx lives are your people’s lives. Not just because there are Jews of all of those races but also because part of tikkun olam must be recreating the wholeness of humanity.

The message of Tikkun Olam is clear to me: Black Lives Matter can’t just be a movement you support. It has to be personal for you, like your family’s life depended on its success.

Think of the times you have imagined early Nazi Germany and the terror Jews felt walking down the street, Jews like my uncle’s family. We, your fellow Americans, your fellow human beings, are terrified, walking down the street. And we are, too often, terrorized in the name of whiteness, in the name of white safety.

It’s time to reject that and say: Black Lives Matter, like they are the lives of your family members.


Read more about Black Lives Matter Jewish mourning rituals.

Anti-Racism as a Sacred Jewish Value by Rabbi Brant Rosen

Jewish solidarity with Black Lives Matter by Rabbi Brant Rosen

“Let us not value property over people; let us not protect material objects while human lives hang in the balance.” — Dr. Yolanda Pierce, A Litany for Those Who Aren’t Ready for Healing

Article: In 1838 There Were 272 Slaves Sold To Keep Georgetown University Open

THIS ARTICLE IS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES–I DID A COPY PASTE SO THAT YOU CAN SEE THIS STORY ALSO.

It is my own personal belief that once you get past the third generation (your grandparents) on any issue then no one owes you any thing, period. In this case where these 272 human beings were sold as slaves so that money could be raised to pay off the debts of George Town University in 1838. So should their very distant relatives whom they never knew or ever met and whom have themselves never been slaves receive financial compensation almost 200 years later? Two observations I would like to bring to your attention also please. 1) The people whom are alive today at the University had nothing to do with that tragedy in 1838. 2) There is the reality that these 272 people were already slaves and were simply sold to other owners, one hell whole situation traded for another. All slavery is a sickening event even in the slave markets within the Islamic world and in southeast Asia but there is no reason for this issue to be more than just a talking point. Okay, that is my opinion on this issue, now if you would please read this article and see what you think okay?

 

WASHINGTON — The human cargo was loaded on ships at a bustling wharf in the nation’s capital, destined for the plantations of the Deep South. Some slaves pleaded for rosaries as they were rounded up, praying for deliverance.

But on this day, in the fall of 1838, no one was spared: not the 2-month-old baby and her mother, not the field hands, not the shoemaker and not Cornelius Hawkins, who was about 13 years old when he was forced on board.

Their panic and desperation would be mostly forgotten for more than a century. But this was no ordinary slave sale. The enslaved African-Americans had belonged to the nation’s most prominent Jesuit priests. And they were sold, along with scores of others, to help secure the future of the premier Catholic institution of higher learning at the time, known today as Georgetown University.

Now, with racial protests roiling college campuses, an unusual collection of Georgetown professors, students, alumni and genealogists is trying to find out what happened to those 272 men, women and children. And they are confronting a particularly wrenching question: What, if anything, is owed to the descendants of slaves who were sold to help ensure the college’s survival?

More than a dozen universities — including Brown, Columbia, Harvard and the University of Virginia — have publicly recognized their ties to slavery and the slave trade. But the 1838 slave sale organized by the Jesuits, who founded and ran Georgetown, stands out for its sheer size, historians say.

At Georgetown, slavery and scholarship were inextricably linked. The college relied on Jesuit plantations in Maryland to help finance its operations, university officials say. (Slaves were often donated by prosperous parishioners.) And the 1838 sale — worth about $3.3 million in today’s dollars — was organized by two of Georgetown’s early presidents, both Jesuit priests.

Some of that money helped to pay off the debts of the struggling college.

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Georgetown University in Washington, seen from across the Potomac River. The institution came under fire last fall, with students demanding justice for the slaves in the 1838 sale. Credit Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times

“The university itself owes its existence to this history,” said Adam Rothman, a historian at Georgetown and a member of a university working group that is studying ways for the institution to acknowledge and try to make amends for its tangled roots in slavery.

Although the working group was established in August, it was student demonstrations at Georgetown in the fall that helped to galvanize alumni and gave new urgency to the administration’s efforts.

The students organized a protest and a sit-in, using the hashtag #GU272 for the slaves who were sold. In November, the university agreed to remove the names of the Rev. Thomas F. Mulledy and the Rev. William McSherry, the college presidents involved in the sale, from two campus buildings.

An alumnus, following the protest from afar, wondered if more needed to be done.

That alumnus, Richard J. Cellini, the chief executive of a technology company and a practicing Catholic, was troubled that neither the Jesuits nor university officials had tried to trace the lives of the enslaved African-Americans or compensate their progeny.

Mr. Cellini is an unlikely racial crusader. A white man, he admitted that he had never spent much time thinking about slavery or African-American history.

But he said he could not stop thinking about the slaves, whose names had been in Georgetown’s archives for decades.

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Richard Cellini, the chief executive of a technology company and a Georgetown alumnus, hired eight genealogists to track down the slaves and their descendants. Credit Gabriella Demczuk for The New York Times

“This is not a disembodied group of people, who are nameless and faceless,” said Mr. Cellini, 52, whose company, Briefcase Analytics, is based in Cambridge, Mass. “These are real people with real names and real descendants.”

Within two weeks, Mr. Cellini had set up a nonprofit, the Georgetown Memory Project, hired eight genealogists and raised more than $10,000 from fellow alumni to finance their research.

Dr. Rothman, the Georgetown historian, heard about Mr. Cellini’s efforts and let him know that he and several of his students were also tracing the slaves. Soon, the two men and their teams were working on parallel tracks.

What has emerged from their research, and that of other scholars, is a glimpse of an insular world dominated by priests who required their slaves to attend Mass for the sake of their salvation, but also whipped and sold some of them. The records describe runaways, harsh plantation conditions and the anguish voiced by some Jesuits over their participation in a system of forced servitude.

“A microcosm of the whole history of American slavery,” Dr. Rothman said.

The enslaved were grandmothers and grandfathers, carpenters and blacksmiths, pregnant women and anxious fathers, children and infants, who were fearful, bewildered and despairing as they saw their families and communities ripped apart by the sale of 1838.

The researchers have used archival records to follow their footsteps, from the Jesuit plantations in Maryland, to the docks of New Orleans, to three plantations west and south of Baton Rouge, La.

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The hope was to eventually identify the slaves’ descendants. By the end of December, one of Mr. Cellini’s genealogists felt confident that she had found a strong test case: the family of the boy, Cornelius Hawkins.

Broken Promises

There are no surviving images of Cornelius, no letters or journals that offer a look into his last hours on a Jesuit plantation in Maryland.

He was not yet five feet tall when he sailed on board the Katharine Jackson, one of several vessels that carried the slaves to the port of New Orleans.

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The ship manifest of the Katharine Jackson, available in full at the Georgetown Slavery archive, listed the name, sex, age and height of each slave transported to New Orleans in the fall of 1838. It showed that the cargo included dozens of children, among them infants as young as 2 months old. Credit Ancestry

An inspector scrutinized the cargo on Dec. 6, 1838. “Examined and found correct,” he wrote of Cornelius and the 129 other people he found on the ship.

The notation betrayed no hint of the turmoil on board. But priests at the Jesuit plantations recounted the panic and fear they witnessed when the slaves departed.

Some children were sold without their parents, records show, and slaves were “dragged off by force to the ship,” the Rev. Thomas Lilly reported. Others, including two of Cornelius’s uncles, ran away before they could be captured.

But few were lucky enough to escape. The Rev. Peter Havermans wrote of an elderly woman who fell to her knees, begging to know what she had done to deserve such a fate, according to Robert Emmett Curran, a retired Georgetown historian who described eyewitness accounts of the sale in his research. Cornelius’s extended family was split, with his aunt Nelly and her daughters shipped to one plantation, and his uncle James and his wife and children sent to another, records show.

At the time, the Catholic Church did not view slave holding as immoral, said the Rev. Thomas R. Murphy, a historian at Seattle University who has written a book about the Jesuits and slavery.

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The Rev. Thomas F. Mulledy, president of Georgetown from 1829 to 1838, and again from 1845 to 1848, arranged the sale. Credit Georgetown University Archives

The Jesuits had sold off individual slaves before. As early as the 1780’s, Dr. Rothman found, they openly discussed the need to cull their stock of human beings.

But the decision to sell virtually all of their enslaved African-Americans in the 1830’s left some priests deeply troubled.

They worried that new owners might not allow the slaves to practice their Catholic faith. They also knew that life on plantations in the Deep South was notoriously brutal, and feared that families might end up being separated and resold.

“It would be better to suffer financial disaster than suffer the loss of our souls with the sale of the slaves,” wrote the Rev. Jan Roothaan, who headed the Jesuits’ international organization from Rome and was initially reluctant to authorize the sale.

But he was persuaded to reconsider by several prominent Jesuits, including Father Mulledy, then the influential president of Georgetown who had overseen its expansion, and Father McSherry, who was in charge of the Jesuits’ Maryland mission. (The two men would swap positions by 1838.)

Mismanaged and inefficient, the Maryland plantations no longer offered a reliable source of income for Georgetown College, which had been founded in 1789. It would not survive, Father Mulledy feared, without an influx of cash.

So in June 1838, he negotiated a deal with Henry Johnson, a member of the House of Representatives, and Jesse Batey, a landowner in Louisiana, to sell Cornelius and the others.

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The bill of sale was dated June 19, 1838, and stated: “Thomas F. Mulledy sells to Jesse Beatty and Henry Johnson two hundred and seventy two negro’s, to wit.” It outlined a payment plan, with discounts if the slaves turned out to be more infirm than described. Credit Maryland Province Archives at Lauinger Library at Georgetown University

Father Mulledy promised his superiors that the slaves would continue to practice their religion. Families would not be separated. And the money raised by the sale would not be used to pay off debt or for operating expenses.

None of those conditions were met, university officials said.

Father Mulledy took most of the down payment he received from the sale — about $500,000 in today’s dollars — and used it to help pay off the debts that Georgetown had incurred under his leadership.

In the uproar that followed, he was called to Rome and reassigned.

The next year, Pope Gregory XVI explicitly barred Catholics from engaging in “this traffic in Blacks … no matter what pretext or excuse.”

But the pope’s order, which did not explicitly address slave ownership or private sales like the one organized by the Jesuits, offered scant comfort to Cornelius and the other slaves.

By the 1840’s, word was trickling back to Washington that the slaves’ new owners had broken their promises. Some slaves suffered at the hands of a cruel overseer.

Roughly two-thirds of the Jesuits’ former slaves — including Cornelius and his family — had been shipped to two plantations so distant from churches that “they never see a Catholic priest,” the Rev. James Van De Velde, a Jesuit who visited Louisiana, wrote in a letter in 1848.

Father Van De Velde begged Jesuit leaders to send money for the construction of a church that would “provide for the salvation of those poor people, who are now utterly neglected.”

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A passage from the Rev. James Van de Velde’s letter reads: “They are all very good people, industrious, faithful, moral, &c. — the character given to them by their owners & their neighbors. But they have scarcely any chance to attend to their religious duties, & the children, several of them not yet baptized, grew up without any religious instruction whatever.”Credit Maryland Province Archives at Lauinger Library at Georgetown University

He addressed his concerns to Father Mulledy, who three years earlier had returned to his post as president of Georgetown.

There is no indication that he received any response.

A Familiar Name

African-Americans are often a fleeting presence in the documents of the 1800’s. Enslaved, marginalized and forced into illiteracy by laws that prohibited them from learning to read and write, many seem like ghosts who pass through this world without leaving a trace.

After the sale, Cornelius vanishes from the public record until 1851 when his trail finally picks back up on a cotton plantation near Maringouin, La.

His owner, Mr. Batey, had died, and Cornelius appeared on the plantation’s inventory, which included 27 mules and horses, 32 hogs, two ox carts and scores of other slaves. He was valued at $900. (“Valuable Plantation and Negroes for Sale,” read one newspaper advertisement in 1852.)

The plantation would be sold again and again and again, records show, but Cornelius’s family remained intact. In 1870, he appeared in the census for the first time. He was about 48 then, a father, a husband, a farm laborer and, finally, a free man.

He might have disappeared from view again for a time, save for something few could have counted on: his deep, abiding faith. It was his Catholicism, born on the Jesuit plantations of his childhood, that would provide researchers with a road map to his descendants.

Cornelius had originally been shipped to a plantation so far from a church that he had married in a civil ceremony. But six years after he appeared in the census, and about three decades after the birth of his first child, he renewed his wedding vows with the blessing of a priest.

His children and grandchildren also embraced the Catholic church. So Judy Riffel, one of the genealogists hired by Mr. Cellini, began following a chain of weddings and births, baptisms and burials. The church records helped lead to a 69-year-old woman in Baton Rouge named Maxine Crump.

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Maxine Crump, 69, a descendant of one of the slaves sold by the Jesuits, in a Louisiana sugar cane field where researchers believe her ancestor once worked. Credit William Widmer for The New York Times

Ms. Crump, a retired television news anchor, was driving to Maringouin, her hometown, in early February when her cellphone rang. Mr. Cellini was on the line.

She listened, stunned, as he told her about her great-great-grandfather, Cornelius Hawkins, who had labored on a plantation just a few miles from where she grew up.

She found out about the Jesuits and Georgetown and the sea voyage to Louisiana. And she learned that Cornelius had worked the soil of a 2,800-acre estate that straddled the Bayou Maringouin.

All of this was new to Ms. Crump, except for the name Cornelius — or Neely, as Cornelius was known.

The name had been passed down from generation to generation in her family. Her great-uncle had the name, as did one of her cousins. Now, for the first time, Ms. Crump understood its origins.

“Oh my God,” she said. “Oh my God.”

Ms. Crump is a familiar figure in Baton Rouge. She was the city’s first black woman television anchor. She runs a nonprofit, Dialogue on Race Louisiana, that offers educational programs on institutional racism and ways to combat it.

She prides herself on being unflappable. But the revelations about her lineage — and the church she grew up in — have unleashed a swirl of emotions.

She is outraged that the church’s leaders sanctioned the buying and selling of slaves, and that Georgetown profited from the sale of her ancestors. She feels great sadness as she envisions Cornelius as a young boy, torn from everything he knew.

‘Now They Are Real to Me’

Mr. Cellini, whose genealogists have already traced more than 200 of the slaves from Maryland to Louisiana, believes there may be thousands of living descendants. He has contacted a few, including Patricia Bayonne-Johnson, president of the Eastern Washington Genealogical Society in Spokane, who is helping to track the Jesuit slaves with her group. (Ms. Bayonne-Johnson discovered her connection through an earlier effort by the university to publish records online about the Jesuit plantations.)

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Patricia Bayonne-Johnson, a descendant of another of the slaves sold by the Jesuits, is the president of the Eastern Washington Genealogical Society in Spokane, Wash., which is helping to track the slaves and their families. Credit Rajah Bose for The New York Times

Meanwhile, Georgetown’s working group has been weighing whether the university should apologize for profiting from slave labor, create a memorial to those enslaved and provide scholarships for their descendants, among other possibilities, said Dr. Rothman, the historian.

“It’s hard to know what could possibly reconcile a history like this,” he said. “What can you do to make amends?”

Ms. Crump, 69, has been asking herself that question, too. She does not put much stock in what she describes as “casual institutional apologies.” But she would like to see a scholarship program that would bring the slaves’ descendants to Georgetown as students.

And she would like to see Cornelius’s name, and those of his parents and children, inscribed on a memorial on campus.

Her ancestors, once amorphous and invisible, are finally taking shape in her mind. There is joy in that, she said, exhilaration even.

“Now they are real to me,” she said, “more real every day.”

She still wants to know more about Cornelius’s beginnings, and about his life as a free man. But when Ms. Riffel, the genealogist, told her where she thought he was buried, Ms. Crump knew exactly where to go.

The two women drove on the narrow roads that line the green, rippling sugar cane fields in Iberville Parish. There was no need for a map. They were heading to the only Catholic cemetery in Maringouin.

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They found the last physical marker of Cornelius’s journey at the Immaculate Heart of Mary cemetery, where Ms. Crump’s father, grandmother and great-grandfather are also buried.

The worn gravestone had toppled, but the wording was plain: “Neely Hawkins Died April 16, 1902.”

Do You Think You Might Have a Connection to the 1838 Slave Sale that Kept Georgetown Afloat?

The New York Times would like to hear from people who have done research into their genealogical history.