Do Not Be Ignorant Enough To Take-Out Iranian National Monuments

Do Not Be Ignorant Enough To Take-Out Iranian National Monuments

 

The General that President Trump ordered the hit on a couple days ago surprised me, I didn’t expect it. This General was a founding block of the hatred from within parts of Shiite Islam. To many now, this mass murderer is now a martyr for millions. But if President Trump did this with any thoughts turned towards to create a crisis, to get peoples minds off of his impeachment, then what?

 

Lets get to the main topic, President Trump has been threatening Iran that he/we will hit at least 52 of their monuments, personally I believe this to be a horrible idea. You do this, take them out and you will unite all of the population of the Shiite believers against us. You do this foolish thing then retaliation against our own, is a certain. Iran and the believers of hard line Shiite believe that they are now in a Holy War against the West, especially against the U.S.. When President George W. Bush invaded Iraq I believe it was just to one-up his Dad. A lot of people have died because of his tunnel vision. Then we bomb to bits Iraq’s infrastructure and at that time commit another huge miscalculation. W. and Mr. Dick rewarded a lot of great government contracts to American firms who hired Americans and Westerners which kept the people of Iraq unemployed and without basic fundamental services like electricity, running clean water, and food. Folks, we can’t go back into (military actions) in Iraq by doing the very thing that will unite those who hate us, against us in Lebanon, Syria, Iran and Iraq. The Government’s beliefs are the problems one may think, so do not take out our anger on their people, leave them alone. There is a difference in a mental state of war and a religion based mental state of war, the hate and the resolve are much deeper. We are going to now have to fight this Tiger with many Kittens as a part of our Nations new DNA. Taking out their National Monuments, is not a good idea folks.

(Philosophy/Poem) Shame

Shame

 

Shame is there really such a thing as shame these days

Shame, do you haunt the door stoop of our innermost thoughts

History, ancient wisdom, flickers of light and dark, the Soul searches

Have we lived the memories that our dreams replay for us at night

 

 

Bloodletting, holding someones last breath in your hands, live or die

What do you say to the relatives of the ones that we killed tonight

Shame you now feel because you chose to take their child’s last breath

To act kindly is to play the role of a fool in the eyes of today’s morality

How much of our soul do we give up to live the life that we chose to live

 

 

Have we acted with dignity in the days that the Lord God has given us

Think of having to wear the guilt and the shame of a deserter’s last name

Or, of having your Dad be the town drunk and your Mom the County Whore

Shame, do we sicken ourself via the depression we have caused our children

 

 

Is Shame an inbred part of the fiber which makes up our bone, skin, and Soul

Are there things that we have done that we will carry the darkness to our grave

Just like pity, ignorance, love, anger, and hate is shame a balance for the Soul

The ability to feel shame should be part of every human’s life, but, is it really

Vietnamese police accelerate illegal immigration probe following lorry deaths in Britain

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF SHANGHAI CHINA’S ‘SHINE’ NEWS NETWORK)

 

Vietnamese police accelerate illegal immigration probe following lorry deaths in Britain

Xinhua
Vietnamese police accelerate illegal immigration probe following lorry deaths in Britain

AFP

Bui Phan Chinh, father of 37-year-old of Bui Phan Thang who is feared to be among the 39 people found dead in a truck in Britain, sits outside his house in Hong Linh district of Vietnam’s Ha Tinh province on October 29, 2019.

Police of Vietnam’s central Ha Tinh province have detained two individuals following reports of local families seeking for their missing relatives in Britain.

The provincial police have instituted legal proceedings against one among them for organizing, brokering illegal immigration and residence in foreign countries, Vietnam News Agency reported on Friday, quoting deputy head of Ha Tinh police Nguyen Tien Nam as saying.

Local police are also collecting testimony from others related to the case, Nam said, adding that they are working with the Ministry of Public Security and police of other localities to further investigate the case.

The investigation, which was officially announced on Thursday, follows reports of 10 families in the province who lost contact with their relatives on the way to Britain after the Essex lorry incident.

Ha Tinh authorities have collected DNA samples from members of those families to send to Britain for victim identification.

On Thursday, police of Vietnam’s central Thua Thien Hue province also pressed criminal charges and instituted legal proceedings against three Vietnamese individuals for organizing and brokering illegal immigration, Vietnam News Agency reported.

A resident from the province was duped into paying the trio over 36,000 U.S. dollars to immigrate to the United States.

Earlier on October 26, police of central Nghe An province filed the same charges against four people, who between 2015 and 2019 received hundreds of thousands dollars from more than 400 people without sending anyone abroad, local online newspaper VnExpress cited Nghe An police as reporting.

China: Identifying dead illegal migrants

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SHANGHAI CHINA NEWS AGENCY ‘SHINE’)

 

Identifying dead illegal migrants

AFP
Identifying dead illegal migrants

AFP

Local Vietnamese residents attend a prayer service for the 39 people found dead in a truck in Britain, during a Sunday mass at the Phu Xuan village in Vietnam’s Nghe An province.

Vietnamese officials collected DNA samples on Sunday from relatives of those feared among 39 people found dead in a truck in Britain, security and family said, as villagers held emotional prayers for the victims.

The 31 men and eight women found dead were initially identified as Chinese but several Vietnamese families have come forward saying they believe their relatives are among the dead.

The grim case has cast light on the extreme dangers facing illegal migrants seeking better lives in Europe.

Many of the suspected victims are believed to have come from impoverished villages in central Vietnam, a feeder of illegal migrants chasing promises of riches overseas.

Few were believed to be carrying identification and families in the area have anxiously awaited news of their loved ones.

A security source in Vietnam said that a team had been dispatched to the area on Sunday to collect DNA samples from relatives of suspected victims.

“We have started collecting hair and blood samples of families,” according to the source, speaking on condition of anonymity.

The father of one of the missing men Nguyen Dinh Luong confirmed that samples were collected by police earlier on Sunday.

“Police said the results would take time,” Luong’s father Nguyen Dinh Gia said from central Nghe An province.

“They didn’t say when they would be available.”

British police said on Saturday they would try to fast track DNA testing but warned results would not be immediately available.

The Northern Irish driver of the refrigerated trailer discovered in an industrial park on Wednesday in Essex, southeast England, has been charged with manslaughter and people trafficking.

As the investigation played out, worshippers gathered in Phu Xuan village in Nghe An province to pray for the missing, kneeling before a priest who delivered an emotional sermon.

Identifying dead illegal migrants

AFP

Local Vietnamese residents take part in a Sunday mass at the Phu Xuan village in Vietnam’s Nghe An province.

“We gather here to pray for all the 39 victims,” father Nguyen Duc Vinh said before a packed cathedral.

“We don’t know yet whether they were our children,” he added as the congregation sang hymns.

Parents in the area have set up makeshift altars for their missing loved ones, many of whom have not been heard from since the truck was discovered.

The mother of missing 28-year-old man Vo Ngoc Nam said that she last heard from her son days before the container was found.

He messaged to say he was going to Britain from Romania, where he had been working for several months.

“I have been waiting anxiously over the past few days for any news from him but we got nothing,” the stricken mother said.

Local officials visited her home on Sunday to gather more information about Nam, as Vietnam’s prime minister ordered government agencies to investigate illegal people smuggling.

Scientists Were Wrong About DNA

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF SCITECHDAILY)

 

Scientists Were Wrong About DNA – It Is Actually Held Together by Hydrophobic Forces

DNA Molecule Opening up in a Hydrophobic Environment

For DNA to be read, replicated or repaired, DNA molecules must open themselves. This happens when the cells use a catalytic protein to create a hydrophobic environment around the molecule. Illustration Credit: Yen Strandqvist/Chalmers University of Technology

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, disprove the prevailing theory of how DNA binds itself. It is not, as is generally believed, hydrogen bonds which bind together the two sides of the DNA structure. Instead, water is the key. The discovery opens doors for new understanding in research in medicine and life sciences. The researchers’ findings are presented in the journal PNAS.

DNA is constructed of two strands, consisting of sugar molecules and phosphate groups. Between these two strands are nitrogen bases, the compounds which make up organisms’ genes, with hydrogen bonds between them. Until now, it was commonly thought that those hydrogen bonds were what held the two strands together.

But now, researchers from Chalmers University of Technology show that the secret to DNA’s helical structure may be that the molecules have a hydrophobic interior, in an environment consisting mainly of water. The environment is therefore hydrophilic, while the DNA molecules’ nitrogen bases are hydrophobic, pushing away the surrounding water. When hydrophobic units are in a hydrophilic environment, they group together, to minimize their exposure to the water.

The role of the hydrogen bonds, which were previously seen as crucial to holding DNA helixes together, appear to be more to do with sorting the base pairs, so that they link together in the correct sequence.

The discovery is crucial for understanding DNA’s relationship with its environment.

Bobo Feng, Chalmers University of Technology

Bobo Feng, Postdoc, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chalmers University of Technology. Credit: Johan Bodell/Chalmers University of Technology

“Cells want to protect their DNA, and not expose it to hydrophobic environments, which can sometimes contain harmful molecules,” says Bobo Feng, one of the researchers behind the study. “But at the same time, the cells’ DNA needs to open up in order to be used.”

“We believe that the cell keeps its DNA in a water solution most of the time, but as soon as a cell wants to do something with its DNA, like read, copy or repair it, it exposes the DNA to a hydrophobic environment.”

Reproduction, for example, involves the base pairs dissolving from one another and opening up. Enzymes then copy both sides of the helix to create new DNA. When it comes to repairing damaged DNA, the damaged areas are subjected to a hydrophobic environment, to be replaced. A catalytic protein creates the hydrophobic environment. This type of protein is central to all DNA repairs, meaning it could be the key to fighting many serious sicknesses.

Understanding these proteins could yield many new insights into how we could, for example, fight resistant bacteria, or potentially even cure cancer. Bacteria use a protein called RecA to repair their DNA, and the researchers believe their results could provide new insight into how this process works – potentially offering methods for stopping it and thereby killing the bacteria.Rad51

 

In human cells, the protein Rad51 repairs DNA and fixes mutated DNA sequences, which otherwise could lead to cancer.

“To understand cancer, we need to understand how DNA repairs. To understand that, we first need to understand DNA itself,” says Bobo Feng. “So far, we have not, because we believed that hydrogen bonds were what held it together. Now, we have shown that instead it is the hydrophobic forces which lie behind it. We have also shown that DNA behaves totally differently in a hydrophobic environment. This could help us to understand DNA, and how it repairs. Nobody has previously placed DNA in a hydrophobic environment like this and studied how it behaves, so it’s not surprising that nobody has discovered this until now.”

More information on the methods the researchers used to show how DNA binds together:

The researchers studied how DNA behaves in an environment which is more hydrophobic than normal, a method they were the first to experiment with.

They used the hydrophobic solution polyethylene glycol, and step-by-step changed the DNA’s surroundings from the naturally hydrophilic environment to a hydrophobic one. They aimed to discover if there is a limit where DNA starts to lose its structure, when the DNA does not have a reason to bind, because the environment is no longer hydrophilic. The researchers observed that when the solution reached the borderline between hydrophilic and hydrophobic, the DNA molecules’ characteristic spiral form started to unravel.

Upon closer inspection, they observed that when the base pairs split from one another (due to external influence, or simply from random movements), holes are formed in the structure, allowing water to leak in. Because DNA wants to keep its interior dry, it presses together, with the base pairs coming together again to squeeze out the water. In a hydrophobic environment, this water is missing, so the holes stay in place.

Reference: “Hydrophobic catalysis and a potential biological role of DNA unstacking induced by environment effects” by Bobo FengRobert P. SosaAnna K. F. MårtenssonKai JiangAlex TongKevin D. DorfmanMasayuki TakahashiPer LincolnCarlos J. BustamanteFredrik Westerlund and Bengt Nordén, 27 August 2019, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1909122116

Mysterious Indus Valley People Gave Rise to Modern-Day South Asians

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF LIVE SCIENCE)

 

Mysterious Indus Valley People Gave Rise to Modern-Day South Asians

a photograph of an ancient skeleton buried in Rakigarhi in India

The skeleton of an individual from the Indus Valley Civilization whose fragile, ancient DNA revealed links to modern-day South Asian populations.
(Image: © Vasant Shinde)

Ancient DNA evidence reveals that the people of the mysterious and complex Indus Valley Civilization are genetically linked to modern South Asians today.

The same gene sequences, drawn from a single individual who died nearly 5,000 years ago and was buried in a cemetery near Rakhigarhi, India, also suggest that the Indus Valley developed farming independently, without major migrations from neighboring farming regions. It’s the first time an individual from the ancient Indus Valley Civilization has yielded any DNA information whatsoever, enabling researchers to link this civilization both to its neighbors and to modern humans.

The Indus Valley, or Harappan, Civilization flourished between about 3300 B.C. and 1300 B.C. in the region that is now covered by parts of Afghanistan, Pakistan and northwestern India, contemporaneous with ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia. The people of the Indus Valley forged an impressively advanced civilization, with large urban centers, standardized systems of weights and measurements and even drainage and irrigation systems. Yet despite that sophistication, archaeologists know far less about the civilization than that of ancient Egypt or Mesopotamia, in part because the Indus Valley writing system hasn’t yet been deciphered.

Cracking Codes: 5 Ancient Languages Yet to Be Deciphered

a map of india, pakistan and afghanistan with sites where indus valley civilization archaeological finds havke been discovered

A map of the Indus Valley, or Harappan, Civilization. Rakhigarhi, the location of the burial that yielded ancient DNA for analysis, is highlighted in blue.

(Image credit: Vasant Shinde)

 Elusive DNA

Gathering ancient DNA from the Indus Valley is an enormous challenge, Vagheesh Narasimhan, one of the leading authors of the new research and a postdoctoral fellow in genetics at Harvard Medical School, Live Science, because the hot, humid climate tends to degrade DNA rapidly. Narasimhan and his colleagues attempted to extract DNA from 61 individuals from the Rakhigarhi cemetery and were successful with only one, skeleton likely belonging to a female which was found nestled in a grave amid round pots, her head to the north and feet to the south.

a round, red, chipped pot found in an ancient burial from the indus valley civilization

A red pot found near the head of the Indus Valley skeleton that yielded ancient DNA.

(Image credit: Vasant Shinde)

The first revelation from the ancient gene sequences was that some of the inhabitants of the Indus Valley are connected by a genetic thread to modern-day South Asians. “About two-thirds to three-fourths of the ancestry of all modern South Asians comes from a population group related to that of this Indus Valley individual,” Narasimhan said.

Where the Indus Valley individual came from is a more difficult question, he said. But the genes do suggest that the highly agricultural Indus people were not closely related to their farming neighbors in the western part of what is now Iran.

“We were able to examine different associations between the advent of farming in that part of the world with the movement of people in that part of the world,” said Narasimhan.

Farming, Narasimhan said, first began in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East around 10,000 years ago. No one knows precisely how it spread from there. Did agriculture pop up independently in areas around the globe, perhaps observed by travelers who brought the idea to plant and cultivate seeds back home? Or did farmers move, bringing their new agricultural lifestyle with them?

In Europe, the genetic evidence suggests that the latter is true: Stone Age farmers introduced Southern Europe to agriculture, then moved north, spreading the practice as they went. But the new Indus Valley genetic evidence hints at a different story in South Asia. The Indus Valley individual’s genes diverged from those of other farming cultures in Iran and the Fertile Crescent before 8000 B.C., the researchers found.

“It diverges at a time prior to the advent of farming almost anywhere in the world,” Narasimhan said. In other words, the Indus Valley individual wasn’t the descendent of wandering Fertile Crescent farmers. She came from a civilization that either developed farming on its own, or simply imported the idea from neighbors — without importing the actual neighbors.

Both immigration and ideas are plausible ways to spread farming, Narasimhan said, and the new research suggests that both happened: immigration in Europe, ideas in South Asia. The results appear today (Sept. 5) in the journal Cell.

Complex populations

The researchers also attempted to link the Indus Valley individual to his or her contemporaries. In a companion paper published today in the journal Science, the researchers reported on ancient and modern DNA data from 523 individuals who lived in South and Central Asia over the last 8,000 years. Intriguingly, 11 of these people — all from outside the Indus Valley — had genetic data that closely matched the Indus Valley Individual. These 11 people also had unusual burials for their locations, Narasimhan said. Together, the genetic and archaeological data hint that those 11 people were migrants from the Indus Valley Civilization to other places, he said.

However, these conclusions should be viewed as tentative, warned Jonathan Mark Kenoyer, an archaeologist and expert on the Indus Valley Civilization at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, who was not involved in the new research. Archaeological evidence suggests that Indus Valley cities were cosmopolitan places populated by people from many different regions, so one person’s genetic makeup might not match the rest of the population. Furthermore, Kenoyer said, burial was a less common way of dealing with the dead than cremation.

“So whatever we do have from cemeteries is not representative of the ancient populations of the Indus cities, but only of one part of one community living in these cities,” Kenoyer said.

And though the Indus individual and the 11 potential migrants found in other areas might have been related, more ancient DNA samples will be needed to show which way people, and their genes, were moving, he said.

Narasimhan echoed this need for more data, comparing the cities of the Indus Valley to modern-day Tokyo or New York City, where people gather from around the world. Ancient DNA is a tool for understanding these complex societies, he said.

“Population mixture and movement at very large scales is just a fundamental fact of human history,” he said. “Being able to document this with ancient DNA, I think, is very powerful.”

Originally published on Live Science.

U.S. military brings back remains from World War II battle of Tarawa

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE JAPAN TIMES)

 

NATIONAL / HISTORY

U.S. military brings back remains from World War II battle of Tarawa

AP

The U.S. military has brought back the remains of more than 20 servicemen killed in one of the bloodiest battles of World War II.

An Air Force cargo plane flew the remains from Tarawa atoll in the remote Pacific island nation of Kiribati (KEE-ree-bas) to Hawaii on Wednesday. Marines carried flag-draped caskets off the plane for a ceremony.

The remains are among those discovered in March by History Flight, a nonprofit organization that searches for the remains of U.S. servicemen lost in past conflicts.

They’re believed to belong to Marines and sailors from the 6th Marine Regiment who were killed during the last night of the three-day Battle of Tarawa. More than 6,000 Americans, Japanese and Koreans died.

Forensic anthropologists with the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency will work to identify the remains using dental records, DNA and other clues.

Blue Sky Science: What is gene editing?

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE RACINE WISCONSIN JOURNAL TIMES)

 

Blue Sky Science: What is gene editing?

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Q What is gene editing?

— Ed Williams, associate fellow at Monsanto Co.

A Krishanu Saha, assistant professor, biomedical engineering and medical history and bioethics, University of Wisconsin-Madison:

Editing genes involves changing the sequence of letters in the DNA. Researchers like to edit genes so they can understand the function of them, particularly genes that relate to various types of disorders that physicians have seen in the clinic. We can use this information to generate new hypotheses of how genes influence diseases.

Historically, editing the genome has been difficult. Several editing technologies go into cells and essentially use “genetic scissors” to cut up the DNA. Once you introduce a cut into the genome, repair processes will try to repair that break. This repair often occurs in imprecise ways that could potentially cause errors and mutations.

Instead, you could take advantage of those repair processes to have the genome incorporate a foreign piece of DNA that has the letters that you want to be inserted.

Such editing has been done in human cells for the last 15-20 years using a set of proteins called nucleases. Nucleases are engineered proteins that cut DNA.

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Recently, the Cas9 nuclease, part of the CRISPR system, has really accelerated the pace of editing throughout biology and engineering.

To give you a frame of reference, about 10 years ago it cost about $50,000 to make only one precise cut in the genome. Attaining high precision was challenging: essentially finding a needle in a haystack, meaning editing one stretch of letters among 3 billion letters in the human genome. Understandably that was hard, and it took a lot of work to engineer the nucleases.

In the years since then, with the advent of the CRISPR system, a component called a guide RNA is used to attain precise editing. It’s easy to make the guide RNA, and this enables us to easily go after multiple parts of the genome at once. These components can be made very quickly on the order of a few dollars rather than thousands of dollars, making the technology more accessible for research.

Blue Sky Science is a collaboration of the Wisconsin State Journal and the Morgridge Institute for Research.

Here’s what Elizabeth Warren’s DNA test shows: She Does Have Some Native Blood

(THIS ARTICLE OS COURTESY OF THE NEW YORK POST)

 

Here’s what Elizabeth Warren’s DNA test shows

She has Native American in her family tree going back generations, according to a report Monday.

Carlos D. Bustamante, a Stanford University professor and expert in the field, determined in his analysis that a pure Native American ancestor appears in Warren’s family “in the range of 6-10 generations ago,” the Boston Globe reported.

That’s consistent with the Massachusetts Democrat’s family lore from her Oklahoma upbringing that her great-great-great-grandmother, O.C. Sarah Smith, was partially Native American.

Bustamante, who won a 2010 MacArthur Fellowship, also known as a Genius Grant, found that the “vast majority” of Warren’s ancestry is European, but “the results strongly support the existence of an unmixed Native American ancestor.”

The release of the DNA findings appear to be a way for Warren, who is expected to run for president in 2020, to put the issue to rest and remove a talking point for her opponents.

In a video posted on her website that begins with Trump calling her “Pocahontas,” Warren is speaking to Bustamante.

“Now, the president likes to call my mom a liar. What do the facts say?” she asks him.

“The facts suggest that you absolutely have a Native American ancestor in your pedigree,” he replies.

Tamping down accusations made by many Republicans that she parlayed her heritage to benefit her career, the video includes a number of law professors — including from Harvard Law and the University of Pennsylvania Law School — attesting that she was hired for her ability.

“Her heritage had no bearing on her hiring. Period,” Jay Westbrook, a professor at the University of Texas Austin School of Law, says in the video.

Warren also includes family members in the video who call out Trump for mocking her.

“He’s talking about stuff he doesn’t have any idea about,” says her nephew Mark Herring.

Warren herself also addresses Trump’s “Pocahontas” comments, saying “my family history is my family history.”

“This isn’t just about casual racism — war-hoops and tomahawk chops. Native Americans have faced discrimination, neglect and violence for generations,” she says in the video. “And President Trump can say what he wants about me, but mocking Native Americans or any group in order to get at me — that’s not what America stands for.”

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Will Churches And Parents Ever Quit Lying To Children About Christmas?

Will Churches And Parents Ever Quit Lying To Children About Christmas?

 

This post today is about one main issue; Santa Clause. I am not saying that all parents, Christian or not, lie too their children and tell them that there is really a Santa and flying Reindeer. But at least here in America it does seem that this fantasy is one that is easy to go along with when your children are in the 3, 4, 5-year-old range. But, there reaches a point with every child where they find out that Mom and Dad have been lying to them all of their life. Why, why do so many parents ‘just go along with this’ until we reach a point where our kids are going to realize that Mom and Dad will lie to you because they have proven themselves to be liars. I have heard people a few times in my life say ‘not to ruin Christmas’ for the young kids by telling them that there is no Santa. What do they mean by ‘ruin Christmas’? If you take Santa out of Christmas what would the children have then? How about the truth? Tell your kids the Christmas birth of celebration of a baby child call Jesus. Even if you do not believe in the Christian faith letting your children know what the truth behind the question, why is there such a thing as Christmas? Even if you are Jewish, Islamic, Hindi, Buddhist, or of no faith at all, do you really want one of the first lessons your child learns about you is that you lie to them? Why can’t people just be truthful with each other, is it truly in our DNA to be liars?

 

In this paragraph I am calling out not just Christian parents but some of the Churches themselves. I have seen and heard first hand of community Churches where even the Pastor is the one who dresses up as Santa for plays inside the Church building. I may be old-fashioned in some of your eyes, but so be it. I know that no one can please everyone, even Jesus was/is hated, so I have learned to only concern myself with trying to please Jesus, then let all of life’s other cards just fall where ever they fall. I personally would like to know how telling our children the ‘Jesus story’ ‘ruins Christmas’? What is wrong with telling your kids that you took a part-time job this fall so that you could have the money to buy your kids a few things extra at Christmas school break? What is wrong with your kids seeing the correlation between how hard Mom and Dad are working so that their kids can have a good Christmas? Is it wrong if our small children learn of the ‘3 wise man’ whom brought gifts to the new-born child as a model for people giving gifts to their own children? Why do so many people whom call themselves Christians have Santa and crew on their front lawns? Why do some Churches do the same? Truth, what is truth? There is only one ‘Truth’, and it is not your version, or mine. We can make-up and say anything, we can call our stories ‘the truth’ if we want to but if we are not telling the actual truth, then the word for us is liars. Now, is Santa real, or is he a lie? What are we telling our children, the truth, or lies?

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