Ukraine Ejects Ex-Georgian President, Deporting Him To Poland

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NPR AND THE BBC)

 

Ukraine Ejects Ex-Georgian President, Deporting Him To Poland

Former Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili speaks to the media prior to a scheduled court hearing in Kiev last month.

Sergei Supinsky/AFP/Getty Images

Ukrainian authorities have deported Mikheil Saakashvili, the former Georgian president who has emerged as a vocal antagonist of the government in Kiev. Ukraine’s border agency confirmed his deportation to Poland on Monday, while videos on social media purported to show Saakashvili getting seized by masked men.

“This person was on Ukrainian territory illegally,” the agency said in a statement released Monday, “and therefore, in compliance with all legal procedures, he was returned to the country from which he arrived.”

Representatives of Saakashvili are describing the incident in starkly different terms.

Earlier Monday the populist politician’s Facebook account released a plea for help, saying “unknown people in masks kidnapped [him] and drove him in an unknown direction.” At the same time, the account uploaded several videos appearing to show his “abduction” in a restaurant at the hands of several shouting men.

Hours later, he called reporters from Warsaw with his account of the confrontation: “They broke into the cafe,” he said. “They tried to close my eyes, tie my hands.”

Within hours he had been placed on a plane to Poland.

Saakashvili and his supporters have cast the move as an attempt to remove a prominent threat to President Petro Poroshenko, a former ally who granted Saakashvili Ukrainian citizenship and even appointed him governor several years ago — only to strip him of that citizenship after Saakashvili quit amid a flurry of accusations that Poroshenko was blocking his attempts at reform.

Saakashvili — a populist politician who also faces a three-year prison sentence in Georgia for embezzlement and abuse of authority during his presidency there — lost his rights as a Ukrainian last summer while he was in the U.S. He returned, though, gathering supporters on the Poland-Ukraine border for a climactic push back into the country in September. Since then he has drawn a considerable following in Ukraine, even as Ukrainian officials have condemned him as a provocateur backed by a pro-Russian criminal group.

Earlier this month Saakashvili lost his appeal for protection against the possibility of getting extradited to Georgia to stand charges.

“The Georgian authorities never asked for my extradition when I was in America or in Europe,” the 50-year-old opposition leader told The Guardian last week, when he was still living and working in central Kiev. “They only did it when I returned to Ukraine because Poroshenko asked them to.”

Now, after grappling with Saakashvili for months, Kiev has managed to eject him. Time will tell whether he will stay out of Ukraine or whether, as he did last year, he will somehow manage to return. In the meantime, Saakashvili might be out of the country — but he is not exactly out of earshot.

“This is not a president and not a man,” he said of Poroshenko in a statement after the deportation Monday, according to Reuters. “This is a lowlife crook who wants to wreck Ukraine. All this shows how weak they are. We will of necessity defeat them.”

Read All About It: Breaking News

Forced Out: When Leaving the Country Means Leaving Your Kids Behind

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF KQED NEWS)

 

Forced Out: When Leaving the Country Means Leaving Your Kids

Maria Mendoza-Sanchez, a Highland Hospital nurse in Oakland, and her husband this week ended their fight to remain in the U.S. after federal immigration authorities denied a last-ditch plea to stay.

Maria, her husband Eusebio Sanchez, and their 12-year-old son, Jesus, boarded a flight at San Francisco International Airport for Mexico City less than an hour before a federal deportation order expired late Wednesday for the couple — leaving behind their three daughters, two of them adults and one a teenager.

Maria Mendoza-Sanchez sits on a couch in her Oakland home on Aug. 16, 2017, hours before she, her husband and son leave Oakland for Mexico City. Her daughter, Melin Sanchez, 21, cries as she watches her mother with concern. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

Sanchez spent her last day in the U.S. doing somewhat routine things: She took her daughter, Elizabeth, 16, to her first day of school as a sophomore and she went to the bank.

But she did some out-of-the-ordinary things, too: She granted power of attorney to her eldest daughter, Vianney, 23. She packed her belongings. And she put her nursing uniforms into a storage box.

“I’m sorry I won’t be there to serve them anymore,” she said of her patients in the oncology and cardiology unit of Highland Hospital, Alameda County’s trauma center. “But one day I will be back, that’s for sure.”

Eusebio Sanchez supports his wife, Maria Mendoza-Sanchez, in their Oakland home on Aug. 16, 2017, hours before they leave for Mexico City after federal immigration authorities denied their request for a reprieve. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

The couple came to the U.S. more than 20 years ago, settling in Oakland in 1994. Maria graduated from Holy Names University with a nursing degree while raising their children. Eusebio worked in construction and eventually became a truck driver.

The couple have no criminal records, and have been undocumented during their time in the U.S. Vianney is protected under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, while their three younger kids are U.S. citizens.

“Fighting an immigration case when you are a Mexican is really three times as difficult as it is other communities,” Maria said as she tried to hold back tears. “It doesn’t matter how hard you work. It doesn’t matter what you do.”

Melin Sanchez, 21, cries as she hugs a neighbor who lives across the street. People drop by the Oakland home on Aug. 16, 2017, hours before Melin’s mother and father leave for Mexico City after federal immigration authorities rejected their last-ditch appeal to stay. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

Under the Obama administration, the couple received two stays, along with legal work visas, to remain in the U.S. But when they applied for another stay in May 2017, federal immigration officials limited it to 90 days — after which they would be deported.

The family was hoping for a reprieve with the help of Sen. Dianne Feinstein. But on Tuesday afternoon, Feinstein called to tell them that federal immigration agents had denied their request for another stay, the senator’s office said.

“All possible avenues to delay their departure have been denied by the Trump administration in what I believe is an act utterly devoid of humanity,” Feinstein said in a statement. “This is a travesty, plain and simple, and evidence that Donald Trump’s immigration ‎policy is nothing more than a hateful deportation program targeting law-abiding families. It’s shameful and stands against the very ideals upon which this country was founded.”

Melin Sanchez, right, is comforted by a friend as they listen to Sanchez’s mother, Maria Mendoza-Sanchez, talk to the press hours before she, her husband and their son leave for Mexico City on Aug. 16, 2017. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

In a statement to KQED from  Immigration and Customs Enforcement, Western Region, the agency confirmed the denial. But ICE added that it gave the couple enough time “to get their personal affairs in order and make preparations for their departure.”

Sanchez said she and her husband prepared their three daughters for life without them in the U.S.: Vianney, a graduate of UC Santa Cruz, will be the legal guardian of Elizabeth as she finishes high school. Their middle daughter, Melin, 21, will stay to finish her last year at UC Santa Cruz.

In Maria’s last hours before flying to Mexico City, Elizabeth came home from her first day of school. She sat on the couch next to her mom and rested her head on her mom’s shoulder.

The two discussed her first day of school — knowing moments like these were coming to an end.

Maria said she also had a conversation with her kids that a parent doesn’t ever think they’ll have.

“Yes, indeed, you separate from your parents but you don’t have to worry about rent, you don’t have to worry about food, and then you’ll be able to finish school,” she recalled telling her daughters.

Luggage for Maria Mendoza-Sanchez, her husband Eusebio, and their 12-year-old son, Jesus, stacked near the door of their Oakland home on Aug. 16, 2017. They left for Mexico City late Wednesday after living in the U.S. for more than 20 years. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

Though she is having to leave, Sanchez said what she’s taking with her to Mexico — her memories — no one can take away.

“Because it’s in my heart and it’s in my mind,” she said.

Photos of the Sanchez family and a sign about nursing decorate a shelf in their home in Oakland on Aug. 16, 2017. (Deborah Svoboda/KQED)

China And Canada Reach Deportation Agreement

(This article is courtesy of the Shanghai Daily News)

Agreement to result in faster deportations from Canada

AN agreement signed between Canada’s border agency and China will result in the faster deportation of Chinese citizens deemed inadmissible by Canadian authorities, a government spokesman said on Sunday.

The deal will allow Chinese officials to travel to Canada to interview Chinese citizens considered inadmissible, with the aim of verifying their identities and documents, said Scott Bardsley, press secretary to Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale. Bardsley said the verification process could otherwise take a long time and had often delayed deportations.

According to Canada’s immigration department, those deemed inadmissible include people with criminal records, serious health or financial issues or who have lied on their visa applications.

The agreement, a one-year pilot program, is part of law enforcement accords signed during Premier Li Keqiang’s Canadian visit last week.

The border agency agreement, which will not be in place immediately, is similar to one China has with the European Union, and officials from both countries will revisit the matter in November, Bardsley said.

The Chinese Embassy in Canada did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Both countries are also talking about an extradition treaty, which China has long wanted so it can press for the return of corrupt officials.

Canada’s Liberal Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, elected last year, is trying to improve ties and increase trade with China after a decade of rocky relations under his Conservative predecessor.

Last week the countries settled a trade dispute and said they would start exploratory talks on a free trade pact.

The countries also signed a memorandum of understanding under which the Royal Canadian Mounted Police and the Ministry of Public Security of China will cooperate to combat a broad range of crimes.

Bardsley said that the memorandum was a renewal of a similar one signed in 2010 that called for broad cooperation.

Refugee Minor Children And Criminal Gangs At Our Southern Borders

THIS IS A COPY PASTE STORY FROM ‘THE PATRIOT DAILY NEWS’

AP: Most Unaccompanied Minors Placed With Illegals

According to a new review of federal data performed by the Associated Press, 80% of unaccompanied minors detained by the U.S. Border Patrol are being sent to live with family members who are in the country illegally. The Obama administration has made no secret of the fact that they place children with relatives regardless of their immigration status, but this is the first time Americans have gotten a comprehensive look at what that really means. As it turns out, illegal immigrants comprise the vast majority of homes where these children are placed.

The Department of Health and Human Services provided the data used by the AP in their analysis. In reviewing the documents, researchers found out exactly where federal officials sent the 71,000 Central American minors who surged across the border in 2014 and 2015. Not only were 80% sent to live with illegal immigrants, another 6% were sent to live with adults under temporary protected status. Only 4% of the children were placed with American citizens.

House Rep. Bob Goodlatte released a statement condemning the situation. “Since the president refuses to enforce our immigration laws, unlawful immigrants in the United States consistently pay criminal organizations along the border thousands of dollars to smuggle their family members into the United States,” he said.

Democrats, however, argue that there are no other answers. Rep. Zoe Lofgren said, “If you were here as a legal resident or a U.S. citizen, you would petition for your child. Their only route is political asylum. It is not the visa system.”

This is always going to be a touchy subject, because few Americans can be dispassionate enough to stand behind strict deportation policies, especially when they involve children.

But enough is enough! Isn’t it odd that the federal government can find these illegals when it’s time to place children with them, but they suddenly have no clue where they are when they skip their deportation hearings? Come on. This isn’t some sticky situation where no one knows what to do. This is the federal government playing dumb in the hopes that Americans won’t realize that this is a systematic effort on the part of the liberals.

Compassion is one thing, but it’s not compassionate to encourage thousands of children to embark on a life-threatening journey to the United States. It’s not compassionate to throw away 200 years of culture and traditions just because the Democrats can’t get citizens to vote for their idiotic policies. A country cannot be a country without defined, protected borders.

 

– See more at: http://patriotnewsdaily.com/ap-most-unaccompanied-minors-placed-with-illegals/#sthash.1ivkcam8.dpuf