(Humor Poem) The Chicago Cub Fan

The Chicago Cub Fan

(WRITTEN OCTOBER 9TH OF 2013)

Indeed we are a special breed

A Cub fan learns a life of losing

Sadly this is quite true indeed

Age of ten years I became one ‘of them’

Not knowing that in my life span

They would probably never win

 

 

Bad ownership or bad managers

It never seems to matter much

On the road or at home they lose

Their following is always faithful

Across the street houses with a view

House tops filled with faithful fans

 

 

We all pay to watch another lose

We faithful stay till all out gone

When the dust has all cleared

Our Cubs find a way lose a twin

Wait till next year hangs in the air

The slogan the Cub fans sing again

Ohio priest under investigation for relationship with minor threw himself off Chicago skyscraper

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON POST)

 

Ohio priest under investigation for relationship with minor threw himself off Chicago skyscraper

 December 22 at 1:46 AM
https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fallrwelcom%2Fposts%2F200696733743231%3A0&width=500On Wednesday morning Chicago police promptly cut off rush hour traffic on a street just north of Millennium Park. A man had flung himself from the heights of the Radisson Blu Aqua Hotel, a sleek,  ultramodern skyscraper reaching 82 stories into the downtown skyline.

The Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office announced the next day it was a suicide, the Chicago Tribune reported. The jumper’s name was James Csaszar.

Three hundred miles away, the ugly news jolted suburban Columbus, Ohio. Until November, Csaszar had worked as a Catholic priest at the Church of the Resurrection in New Albany, Ohio. Then, after misconduct allegations surfaced about the priest, the 44-year-old was placed on administrative leave.

The investigation into Csaszar will continue despite his death, Ohio law enforcement said.

The Diocese’s decision to suspend Csaszar was due to “questionable text and telephone communications with a minor,” the church stated in a news release. The diocese went further to note the charges were also related to a “potential misuse of church funds” while Csaszar was serving at St. Rose of Lima Parish in New Lexington, Ohio.

“Following a diocesan review of the matter, the New Lexington Police were contacted and all information was turned over to them and the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation for their review,” the statement said.

Columbus’s 10TV reported New Lexington Police sent an email to the Ohio Bureau of Criminal Investigation and Identification with the subject line: “inappropriate relationship between Priest and 16yom.” According to the station, police were only in the preliminary stages of the investigation at the time of Csaszar’s suicide.

Csaszar worked at St. Rose Parish between 2005 and 2016. The Diocese of Columbus’s website indicates he was ordained on June 26, 1999.

The priest was evidently an active and well-liked figure in his community, delivering baccalaureate masses to local Catholic high schools and hosting “Catholic Singles on Fire for Christ” mixers.

“You could always talk to him and felt comfortable speaking with him and he was always there to listen to you no matter where he was on the street or what it was,” Cheryl Dodson, a New Lexington business owner, told the NBC 4. “He was one of my favorites. Out of all the Catholic priests I’ve known and affiliated with, he was one of my favorites.”

Some church members stuck with Csaszar after the allegations emerged last November. That month, an online petition was started in support of the priest.

“Evidenced, in part, by the attendance at Sunday Mass, Father Jim has been instrumental in growing Church of the Resurrection, in numbers, in spirituality, in community and in service,” the posting said. “While we don’t know the circumstances and reason for the leave, it is critical that we stay steadfast as a Parish and stay in prayerful support of Father Jim. If you are a Parishioner of The Church of the Resurrection in New Albany, Ohio, please add your name to this petition as a show of your support.”

Following the suicide, the Columbus Diocese released a statement this week: “We are reminded throughout sacred scripture that God our Father is loving, merciful, compassionate and forgiving,” it said.

“We also know that in his years of priestly ministry Fr. Csaszar did many good things for the people that he served in his parish assignments. And so we ask that everyone pray for Father Csaszar, his family, friends, and parishioners during this most difficult time.”

Thunder charter plane dented en route to Chicago, lands safely

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CSPN)

 

Thunder charter plane dented en route to Chicago, lands safely

As the Oklahoma City Thunder exited their team charter after landing in Chicago shortly after 1 a.m. CT Saturday, they were greeted by a surprising sight: a large dent in the nose of the plane.

Multiple players took to social media to post about the bizarre situation, but the team said everyone is safe and sound, and the flight landed as planned and on schedule at Midway International Airport.

Carmelo Anthony posted an image of the dented plane with the caption, “What could we have possibly hit in the SKY at this time of night? Everyone is safe, though.”

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bax_0AaAqn7/embed/captioned/?cr=1&v=7&wp=815#%7B%22ci%22%3A0%2C%22os%22%3A1642.665%7DThe plane “likely encountered a bird” during its descent, a Delta Air Lines spokesperson said in a statement, adding that the aircraft landed safely.

A team official said the flight was a little rough, but not extreme or out of the ordinary.

The Thunder played the Timberwolves in Minneapolis on Friday and left around 11:30 p.m. to fly to Chicago where they play the Bulls on Saturday.

A Highly Contagious Dog Flu Has Hit Florida

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME NEWS)

A Highly Contagious Dog Flu Has Hit Florida. Here’s What to Know

May 31, 2017

An outbreak of the dog flu, which has sickened hundreds of canines across the country over the last two years, has hit Florida for the first time. The highly contagious virus recently infected at least a dozen dogs in the Sunshine State, the University of Florida’s College of Veterinary Medicine said Wednesday. While the virus strain is not usually fatal and is not known to be transferrable to humans, it can spread rapidly and cause debilitating complications.

“There’s always that concern that another large outcome could happen again,” said Michael San Filippo, a spokesman for the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), referring to an outbreak of the dog flu in Chicago in 2015, when hundreds of illnesses were reported. “We don’t want people to panic because typically, from what we know, it’s usually mild, although it can progress and can lead to other infections and be serious. We want to catch these things as early as possible.”

Here’s what to know about the dog flu:

What is the dog flu?

Canine influenza, more commonly known as the dog flu, is a respiratory disease that is easily spread among dogs, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Symptoms are similar to what humans have when infected with the flu, including coughing, runny nose and fever. However, some dogs can suffer from life-threatening pneumonia. There are two different viruses, including the latest H3N2 virus, which was first detected in dogs in the U.S. in 2015. At the time, more than 1,000 illnesses were reported in Illinois, where it began, and several nearby states, according to the AVMA. At least six cases were fatal, the organization said. The affected states included Georgia, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Alabama, California, Texas, New York, Iowa, Michigan, Wisconsin and Indiana, according to Cornell’s Animal Health Diagnostic Center.

What happened in Florida?

At least 12 dogs were recently diagnosed with canine influenza after either attending two dog shows or being exposed to infected animals from the events, health officials said. The disease appears to have stemmed from a dog show in Perry, Ga. and another in Deland, Fla. — both of which took place late this month. All dogs being treated are in stable condition, according to the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. This is the first time H3N2 canine influenza has been found in the state, health officials said.

It’s unclear how many cases of canine influenza there currently are in the country, as statistics are generally tracked locally, not nationally, a ccording to Edward Dubovi, a v irology professor at Cornell’s Animal Health Diagnostic Center. The 2015 outbreak appeared to have ebbed by that October, said C olin Parrish, another virology professor at Cornell. But health officials in Chicago say the dog flu is still a problem in the area. The Chicago Veterinary Medical Association, which did not provide recent statistics, urged pet owners in March to be “vigilant” and “take necessary action steps “ to prevent their dogs from contracting the virus.

How can dog flu be prevented?

Pet owners can discuss with a veterinarian whether their dogs should be vaccinated for the virus. Dogs are at the highest risk of contracting the virus at animal shelters, boarding kennels, grooming salons, canine daycare, dog parks and other locations where the animals are in close quarters.

United Passenger Will Need Surgery: Has ‘Significant’ Concussion, Broken Nose, Missing 2 Front Teeth

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SHANGHAI DAILY NEWS)

United passenger will need surgery

A PASSENGER dragged from a United Express flight suffered “significant” concussion and a broken nose, and he lost two front teeth, one of his lawyers said yesterday.

Dr David Dao has been discharged from hospital but he will require reconstructive surgery, said attorney Thomas Demetrio, whose firm is representing the 69-year-old Kentucky physician.

Dao was removed from the plane on Sunday after he refused to give up his seat on the full flight from Chicago to Louisville.

One of Dao’s five children, Crystal Pepper, said the family was “horrified, shocked and sickened” to learn and see what happened. She said seeing her father removed from the flight was “exacerbated” by the fact it was caught on video and widely distributed.

Demetrio said he will likely file a lawsuit on Dao’s behalf, adding that airlines — and United in particular — have long “bullied” passengers.

The video of the passenger being dragged by an officer from the flight also shone an unwanted spotlight on the little-known police force that guards Chicago’s two main airports.

Chicago’s aviation officers are not part of the regular police force, unlike in many other big cities. They get less training than regular officers and can’t carry firearms inside the airports. Three are now on leave amid outrage over how they treated the passenger.

Cellphone footage of the confrontation “really has put it (the force) at risk,” Alderman Chris Taliaferro said on Wednesday, the day before aldermen were due to grill United and the Chicago Aviation Department about why Dao was yanked out of his seat at O’Hare Airport.

The city council is looking for answers about the embarrassing video seen around the world. At the top of the list of questions is whether the airport officers even had the legal authority to board the plane, said Alderman Michael Zalewski, who leads the council’s aviation committee.

“They are allowed in the terminal and baggage area, but my understanding is they may not be allowed on a plane,” he said. Zalewski also said he is not sure if the officers have the authority to make arrests or if they are only authorized to write tickets.

An aviation department spokeswoman did not respond to questions about the duties of the police force, but Zalewski said the agency’s commissioner was to be asked about them.

The department will also be asked about training. Zalewski said airport officers receive four months of training compared with the six months cadets must complete before joining the city’s police department.

“We don’t know what that two-month gap means,” he said, adding that he will ask if the airport officers receive the same kind of training in de-escalating tense situations that city police officers get.

The roughly 300 aviation police officers earn between US$50,000 and US$88,000 a year and cost the city about US$19 million a year. They are city employees but not members of the Chicago Police Department.

The city also assigns approximately 200 regular police officers to the two airports, all of them armed.

One possibility for reform could be to disband the aviation force in favor of more city police officers, though Taliaferro thinks that is unlikely.

Outrage In Vietnam Over United Airlines Treatment Of 69 yr Old Vietnamese Born Doctor

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF REUTERS)

By Mai Nguyen | HANOI

Outrage spread to Vietnam on Wednesday over United Airlines’ handling of a passenger dragged from his seat after it emerged that the 69-year-old U.S. doctor was Vietnamese by birth.

Although United Airlines has no direct flights to Vietnam, there were widespread calls on social media for a boycott after video showed a bloodied David Dao being yanked out of the plane by airport security on Sunday to make way for United employees.

The ire in Vietnam grew quickly after it was reported that Dao’s origins were not in the Southeast Asian country’s old enemy, China, as many had at first assumed.

Vietnamese also fumed at allegations over Dao’s past reported in the United States as irrelevant and possibly racist.

“Watching this makes my blood boil, I’ll never fly United Airlines,” commented Anh Trang Khuya on Facebook, the most widely used social media platform in Vietnam.

Nguyen Khac Huy wrote: “Boycott United!!! This is excessive! Let’s be loving and united, Vietnamese people!”

There was no immediate comment from the government or in state media.

Video showing Dao being pulled from United Airlines Flight 3411 at Chicago O’Hare International Airport on Sunday went viral and the worldwide backlash hit the airline’s share price and prompted an apology from the company chief executive.

Kentucky’s medical board website shows that a doctor David Dao graduated in 1974 in Ho Chi Minh City – then known as Saigon and the capital of U.S.-backed South Vietnam before its defeat and the reunification of Vietnam under communist rule a year later.

Around that time, Dao left for the United States, according to U.S. media and Vietnamese websites.

Vietnamese media said that Dao was also a songwriter and crooner of soulful ballads – including one about the memory of rain falling in Saigon.

Reports in U.S. media of an offence that had led to Dao losing his medical license in 2003 were dismissed in Vietnam as a probable smear campaign.

“Dr. Dao didn’t do anything wrong on that flight and that’s the main thing,” wrote Clarence Dung Taylor in a post that had more than 4,000 likes.

The attitude to the case shifted dramatically in Vietnam once it was reported that Dao was not from China – an ancient enemy with which Vietnam continues to have a maritime dispute over the South China Sea.

When initial reports had suggested the man being dragged from the plane was Chinese, some Vietnamese had posted strongly unsympathetic comments about him.

“So funny,” wrote Bui Nguyen Trong Nghia. “Now they know he’s Vietnamese, most people stand up to advocate. Whether it’s Vietnamese or Chinese, there’ll be discrimination as we’re Asian.”

(Writing by Matthew Tostevin; Editing by Robert Birsel)

United Airlines Overbooks Flight: Security Forcibly Remove Doctor Who Would Give Up His Seat

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE BBC)

United Airlines: Passenger forcibly removed from flight

Media caption Passenger dragged off a United flight. Video: Audra D. Bridges

Videos showing a man being violently removed from a United Airlines flight have provoked an outcry on social media.

The footage taken inside the airliner shows a man being violently pulled out of his seat and dragged down the aisle as passengers prepared to take off from Chicago to Louisville on Sunday evening.

The airline in question – United – has tweeted an apology for what happened and says it is investigating.

One 50-second clip of the incident on Twitter was re-tweeted 16,000 times since it was posted that day.

Jayse D Anspach, who posted the footage, tweeted: “#United overbooked and wanted four of us to volunteer to give up our seats for personnel that needed to be at work the next day.”

“No one volunteered, so United decided to choose for us. They chose an Asian doctor and his wife.”

“The doctor needed to work at the hospital the next day, so he refused to volunteer,” Mr Anspach added.

“Ten minutes later, the doctor runs back into the plane with a bloody face, clings to a post in the back, chanting, “I need to go home.”

One of the three security officers involved has been “placed on leave”, the Chicago Department of Aviation said, and his actions were “obviously not condoned by the Department”.

The department also said it would carry out a review into the incident, which it said was “not in accordance with our standard operating procedure”.

Another passenger Audra D. Bridges, posted a video of the incident on Facebook that has been viewed over 400,000 times.

She wrote: “Please share this video. We are on this flight. United airlines overbooked the flight.”

“They randomly selected people to kick off so their standby crew could have a seat.

“This man is a doctor and has to be at the hospital in the morning,” she added.

“He did not want to get off. We are all shaky and so disgusted.”

Man being shown pulled out of his seatImage copyrightTYLER BRIDGES/TWITTER
Image captionThe man who is believed to be a doctor is dragged out of his seat by flight security

Thousands of Facebook comments have been posted about what happened.

One person wrote: “This is infuriating”

Another posted: “OMG So sad to see someone being treated like this. I wont fly United ever again.”

But another felt the video raised some unanswered questions.

“There has to be more to this story,” he said.

“Usually when a flight is overbooked they offer free flight vouchers to those willing to change flights or go on standby and a couple of people will jump at those as their travel plans may be flexible.”

“I feel like this specific incident HAS to be deeper than what we are seeing in this video,” he added.

In a statement United airlines told the BBC: “Flight 3411 from Chicago to Louisville was overbooked.”

“After our team looked for volunteers, one customer refused to leave the aircraft voluntarily and law enforcement was asked to come to the gate,” the airline added.

The chief executive of United, Oscar Munoz, has since made a statement on Twitter: “This is an upsetting event to all of us here at United. I apologise for having to re-accommodate these customers.”

“Our team is moving with a sense of urgency to work with the authorities and conduct our own detailed review of what happened.

“We are also reaching out to this passenger to talk directly to him and further address and resolve the situation,” he added.

By Rozina Sini, BBC’s UGC and Social News team

Arrest Made In Fatal Shooting Of 11-Year-Old Chicago Girl

(THIS ARTICLES IS COURTESY OF CNN)

Arrest made in fatal shooting of 11-year-old Chicago girl

Takiya Holmes, left, died Tuesday. Kanari Gentry-Bowers is in critical condition.

Story highlights

  • Atwan Jones, 19, has been charged with murder
  • Takiya Holmes,11, died after being struck in the head by a stray bullet

(CNN)A 19-year-old man has been charged with murder in connection with one of three shootings involving children in Chicago during a three-day period, police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said Wednesday.

The suspect, Atwan Jones, could face additional charges related to the shooting of 11-year-old Takiya Holmes, who died after being struck in the head by a stray bullet while sitting in the backseat of a minivan on Saturday, police said.
Takiya did not regain consciousness after the shooting and died Tuesday morning “in her mother’s arms,” according to a Facebook post from her cousin, Rachel Williams.
Patsy Holmes, Takiya’s grandmother, told HLN on Wednesday that the arrest gave her family “a little peace.”
“I’d like to just tell the public, if you know something, don’t be afraid to tell,” she said.
She said, “A lot of people know these people that’s doing the shootings but they won’t say anything. And some of them (are) in fear because they’re afraid that if they say something, they’re going to retaliate against them.”
Jones, who lives across the street from where Takiya was shot, allegedly saw three people on that street that “he felt did not belong,” retrieved a handgun and opened fire, according to police Commander Brendan Deenihan.
Jones missed his intended targets but a stray bullet caught Takiya moments after her mother’s minivan pulled up, Deenihan said.
The suspect, who had been arrested for various offenses as a juvenile, turned himself after people in the area identified him to police, Deenihan said.
Jones was being held without bond. It was unclear Wednesday whether he has an attorney.
In a city that had 762 homicides last year, an increase of more than 50% from the previous year, Johnson made an impassioned plea to state legislators for stricter sentences for gun crimes.
“Give us the tools to make offenders think twice about pulling a trigger,” he said at a news conference. “We need to create a culture of accountability… Enough is enough.”
Illinois has relatively restrictive gun laws and Gov. Bruce Rauner last year approved a law imposing a stiff penalty on anyone without a gun-owner identification card who brings a gun into the state of Illinois to sell.
The law is meant to cut down on straw purchasers who buy guns in states with loose laws and drive them into cities with tough gun control laws, such as Chicago, for resale. Officials point to neighboring Indiana.
Takiya was one of two girls struck by stray bullets in the city on Saturday alone, bloody incidents that further highlighted the city’s problem with violent crime. Of the three children, two have died.
Kanari Gentry-Bowers, 12, is listed in critical condition at Stroger Hospital, according to CNN affiliate WLS.
On Tuesday, a 2-year-old child and a 26-year-old man were shot and killed while they were riding in a car, Chicago police said. Another person in the vehicle, a pregnant woman, also was shot; she and her unborn child were in stable condition, police said.
The 2-year-old was identified as Lavontay White, according to records provided by the Cook County Medical Examiner’s office.
The shooting was captured in a social media video that shows the three in a vehicle, listening to music, when 16 gunshots rang out. The woman ran from the vehicle screaming and said she had been shot in the stomach.

Recent Immigration Raids in U.S. Cities

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME NEWS AGENCY)

What to Know About Recent Immigration Raids in U.S. Cities

10:26 AM Eastern

Hundreds of undocumented immigrants were arrested in raids by Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials in cities across the U.S. this week — the first widespread enforcement of President Donald Trump’s policy aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration.

Trump campaigned on a promise to take action against illegal immigration, pledging to deport up to 3 million undocumented immigrants by targeting those with criminal records. Notably, experts have challenged Trump’s estimates of the number of undocumented immigrants who have been convicted of crimes.

The raids took place at homes and workplaces in Atlanta, Chicago, New York, the Los Angeles area, North Carolina and South Carolina, the Washington Post reported, citing immigration officials.

Here are some key details to know:

This action follows Trump’s executive order on immigration
Trump signed an executive order last month aimed at cracking down on illegal immigration. It set a priority of deporting any undocumented immigrant who had been charged with a crime, convicted of a crime or had “committed acts that constitute a chargeable criminal offense.”

But immigration officials said the recent raids were a “routine” enforcement practice.

“These are existing, established fugitive operations teams. ICE does not conduct sweeps or raids that target aliens indiscriminately,” said Gillian Christensen, acting press secretary for the Department of Homeland Security, according to CNN. “ICE only conducts targeted enforcement of criminal aliens and other individuals who are in violation of our nation’s immigration laws.”

Raids caused panic in immigrant communities
Recent arrests and deportations have affected people who were not considered a priority for deportation under the Obama administration.

Protests broke out in Phoenix this week over the deportation of a mother who had lived in the U.S. for 21 years and was arrested during a routine meeting with ICE on Wednesday. She had been convicted of a felony in 2008 for using a fake social security number to gain employment, but she was not previously considered a deportation priority.

Officials conducted similar raids during Obama’s presidency but prioritized immigrants who were deemed a threat to national security or public safety. Still, more than 2 million people were deported under Obama, leading some critics to label him “Deporter in Chief.”

The raids this week caused fear and confusion in immigrant communities, and immigrants’ rights advocates argued it was different than typical law enforcement action. Some groups issued guidance for dealing with ICE officials. In Austin, Texas, teachers handed out flyers to students, explaining “what to do if ICE comes to your door,” the Austin American-Statesman reported.

Democratic leaders and lawmakers spoke out about the arrests
“Angelenos should not have to fear raids that are disruptive to their peace of mind and bring unnecessary anxiety to our homes, schools, and workplaces,” Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said Friday. “The Administration should take a just, humane, and sensible approach that does not cause pain for people who only want to live their lives and raise their families in the communities they call home.”

Texas Rep. Joaquin Castro confirmed there was a “targeted operation” taking place in the state and said he was “concerned” about the raids.

“I am asking ICE to clarify whether these individuals are in fact dangerous, violent threats to our communities, and not people who are here peacefully raising families and contributing to our state,” he said in a statement.

For Many on Chicago’s South Side, Obama’s Farewell Will Be Personal

 

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE NEW YORK TIMES)

The chair President Obama used to sit in to get his haircut at the Hyde Park Hair Salon. An Obama cut, at $24, remains popular.Credit David Kasnic for The New York Times

CHICAGO — If the metal barricades, “Do Not Enter” signs and lurking Secret Service agents were a bother the past eight years in the Hyde Park-Kenwood area — the South Side neighborhood where President Obama still owns a house, but rarely has been home — residents are not complaining.

“All that’s been fine, really. You get used to it,” said Adela Cepeda, who like many people on Mr. Obama’s block of Greenwood Avenue met him before he was president, or a senator, or elected to anything at all. “To me, it’s just too bad his time will be over. This has been fabulous for Chicago in a certain way. I think that all things being equal, we came first. But I guess all good things must end.”

As Mr. Obama prepared to give his farewell address on Tuesday from McCormick Place, the cavernous convention center beside Lake Michigan, people in his hometown sounded by turns possessive, proud, anxious and wistful. With his election in 2008, this city — and its heavily African-American South Side in particular — had suddenly been thrust to the forefront of the national political conversation. And so early Saturday, in temperatures barely above zero, thousands waited outside for the chance to receive free tickets to witness the end of that story. By Sunday, tickets were being hawked online for as much as $5,000.

Lining Up for Obama’s Farewell Address

People waited in long lines in sub-zero wind chill temperatures outside McCormick Place to get tickets for President Obama’s farewell speech.

By REUTERS on Publish Date January 10, 2017. Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images. Watch in Times Video »

Near the Obamas’ red brick Georgian, not far from the University of Chicago, some wondered gloomily whether his legacy might now be erased by his successor, Donald J. Trump, who received just 12 percent of the vote in Chicago and only single-digit slivers in the wards near Mr. Obama’s house.

Continue reading the main story

“I guess I feel sad,” said Antonio Coye, a barber at the Hyde Park Hair Salon, where the plain black chair Mr. Obama used to sit in for his trims is now preserved under glass. Not long ago, a crew of Lycra-clad bicyclists peered at the chair from the foyer of the small shop, where a line of men forms on Saturdays and “the Obama cut,” a professional-looking taper on the side and the back for $24, remains popular.

Photo

Icelia Crouse and her sister Stephanie inside of Valois, a restaurant in Chicago’s Hyde Park neighborhood that President Obama used to frequent. Credit David Kasnic for The New York Times

“This was really something unique that happened,” Mr. Coye said as he worked on a customer with a razor over the weekend. “It was the first time somebody really different became president, and he did a really good job. To me, the person in office after him is going to make his time in office stand out even more than it did already.”

Full-size tour buses, once an oddity, cruise down Hyde Park Boulevard with some frequency now. People can occasionally be seen pulling over with cameras outside a nondescript shopping center along 53rd Street, where an easy-to-overlook plaque notes the Obamas’ first date, during which Barack Obama bought Michelle Robinson ice cream from a Baskin-Robbins shop that has since become a Subway.

For a place that has not forgotten being called the Second City by a New Yorker writer long ago, Chicago had watched its standing, in the eyes of the coasts, rise along with Mr. Obama’s. Chicagoans were entrusted with important posts in Washington, and many of them, along with the first family, had roots on the South Side, rather than on the richer and whiter North Side.

At points during the eight-year term, Chicago voices seemed to be everywhere. Both Valerie Jarrett and David Axelrod, who is now back in Hyde Park at the Institute of Politics at the University of Chicago, were senior advisers. Chicago cabinet members included Arne Duncan (education) and Penny Pritzker (commerce). Austan Goolsbee, another Hyde Parker, was an economic adviser, and Desirée Rogers was an early White House social secretary. And Mr. Obama’s first-term chiefs of staff included William M. Daley, the brother of Chicago’s former mayor, and Rahm Emanuel, who was later elected mayor.

But it is not just the shutting of that pipeline that causes concern. In Mr. Obama’s old neighborhood, the notion that Mr. Trump was soon to step in left some speaking of the president’s farewell speech in terms more akin to a funeral than a celebration.

Many recalled watching an ebullient re-election evening here in 2012, when President Obama appeared at McCormick Place — a bookend, it now seems, to Tuesday night. Others recounted how they had felt as they watched his 2008 victory from Grant Park, the city’s downtown front yard along the lake, where he addressed thousands with the gleaming Chicago skyline as a backdrop.

Photo

A plaque noting the Obamas’ first date, at a former Baskin-Robbins on 53rd Street in Chicago.Credit David Kasnic for The New York Times

“It was a magical moment — such a positive buzz all around,” said Kevin Elliott, a manager at 57th Street Books, an underground maze where Mr. Obama had held book signings and often visited before his election.

Even here, though, a few have questioned whether Mr. Obama did as much as he could during his time in office to solve urban problems of gang violence, joblessness and segregation. In Chicago, violence cascaded last year: More people, 762, were murdered in the president’s hometown in 2016 than in New York and Los Angeles combined. Some complained that Mr. Obama had not interceded forcefully enough.

“He was a community organizer here himself, and he should be embarrassed that he came in as president and the problems have actually worsened,” said Ja’Mal Green, a local activist.

But others, like Mr. Coye, the barber, noted that Mr. Obama was president of the United States, not of the South Side: “Who knows what happens now, but you can’t have expected him to solve this city’s violence.”

The Obama’s intend to stay in Washington while their younger daughter finishes high school, but many residents here believe that they might never return to the house on Greenwood Avenue. He is building his presidential library in Chicago, many say, and that is just fine.

“No, he’s not coming back, and he shouldn’t, either — he couldn’t go anywhere without being recognized,” said Stephanie Crouse, 53, a school bus driver eating her lunch from a tray at Valois, a Hyde Park cafeteria Mr. Obama once frequented.

“This is like your kids,” she added. “He’s done his thing. He did what he could. And you’re sending him off now to graduate and move up and go off to better things.”

James' World 2

Assorted human interest posts.

Dining with Donald

Donald on dining in and out

Phuro! Be inspired! BLOG

Van inspiratie tot transformatie

Maulik Pandit

Do It For You

Believe

I am not perfect but I am limited edition~RM

Down The Rabbit Hole

How long is forever? Sometimes just one second

Author's Canvas

Where writing is celebrated

Barstool Buddha

Everything Is Subject To Change.

%d bloggers like this: