CHEROKEE NATION HOSTS SECOND ANNUAL ELDER’S SUMMIT

(This article is courtesy of the Native News On Line)

CHEROKEE NATION HOSTS SECOND ANNUAL ELDER’S SUMMIT

Hundreds of Cherokee elders attended the first-ever Cherokee Nation Elder’s Summit in 2015. With that success, the tribe expanded the second annual Cherokee Nation Elder’s Summit to two locations, Tahlequah and Vinita.

Hundreds of Cherokee elders attended the first-ever Cherokee Nation Elder’s Summit in 2015. With that success, the tribe expanded the second annual Cherokee Nation Elder’s Summit to two locations, Tahlequah and Vinita.

Published September 19, 2016

TAHLEQUAH — Cherokee elders across the tribe’s 14-county jurisdiction are invited to the second annual Cherokee Nation Elder’s Summit. This year’s summit is being held in two locations, Vinita and Tahlequah, in order to reach more elders.

The Elder’s Summit in Vinita will be hosted at the Vinita Health Center on Tuesday, September 27, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., with the summit in Tahlequah being hosted at the Tahlequah Armory Municipal Center on Thursday, September 29, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Last year’s summit marked the launch of the tribe’s Elder Fraud Protection Initiative. Led by Cherokee Nation Deputy Chief S. Joe Crittenden, the Cherokee Nation administration, Attorney General’s office and Marshal Service joined forces, seeking to put an end to the growing problem of elder abuse. The coalition continues to collaborate with state and local agencies to prevent elder abuse and prosecute individuals who financially exploit or otherwise abuse Cherokee elders.

“It’s our responsibly to ensure our most valuable, and in many cases our most vulnerable, citizens remain safe from abuse, whether it’s physical or financial or emotional. Our elders should be respected and appreciated for their experience and cultural knowledge. That has always been an important Cherokee value,” said Cherokee Nation Secretary of State Chuck Hoskin Jr. “We started this awareness and education initiative last year and continue to add more content to better connect Cherokee senior citizens with programs and services that can help them the most.”

Various booths will be set up at the summit locations, offering information on how to spot and report elder abuse and resources if one is a victim. Elder abuse has reached epidemic proportions in Oklahoma. In 2012, Oklahoma Adult Protective Services received nearly 19,000 reports of abuse, neglect or exploitation of seniors. Often elders experiencing abuse or exploitation don’t know where to turn or how to seek help.

(Humor/Poem) Wagons West

Wagons West

 

Wagon west from Virginia’s foothills

Six kids in the family

Four wheels of wood and steel

Two mules a straining at the whip

Bluegrass Appalachian foothills

Ohio river first then the mighty Mississippi

Cherokee arrows, thankful Lord, they all missed

Camping under the arch, evening sun pointing west

Wagon master hollering, everyone get in line

If the weather holds, and no injuns attack

We should all be at our new home soon

Spearfish Dakota, in about three week’s time

Mr. Custer says is no need to worry about Sioux

Says their running scared of the bugle and the blue

The train, we got six injuns riding point

You can see the hate of us in their eyes

Mr. Custer, on your words

Thirty families risk their lives

We had not yet cleared Nebraska

News came, yellow hair and the 7th

Would ride these plains no more

One more week we made the Black Hills

Land of gold, coal, and lumber

O yes and several thousand Sioux on every side

Now my family and I are all six feet under

In this cold ground we had hoped one day to plow