White Nationalists Carrying Torches Descend on Charlottesville Again

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME.COM)

 

White Nationalists Carrying Torches Descend on Charlottesville Again

10:34 AM ET

White nationalists once again descended on Charlottesville, Va. for a torch rally Saturday night, less than two months after the college town descended into chaos when violent clashes broke out between the group and people protesting them.

Prominent white nationalist Richard Spencer and as many as 50 others held a brief rally with tiki torches in Emancipation park that lasted between five and 10 minutes, after which they boarded the bus and left the city, CNN reports. Charlottesville authorities are discussing the possibilities of legal action in response, according to a statement from local police.

 nEO-nAZI

https://twitter.com/search?q=charlottesville%20police&src=tyah&lang=en

Video footage posted on social media by Spencer showed the group chanting “you will not replace us” and “Russia is our friend, the south will rise again.”

Charlottesville Police Department did not immediately respond to a request for comment from TIME.

Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer characterized the rally as “another despicable visit by Neo-Nazi cowards” in a Twitter post. “You’re not welcome here! Go home!” he tweeted. “Meantime we’re looking at all our legal options. Stay tuned.”

“How are we ‘cowards?’ We came back,” Spencer replied on Twitter. “Also, you have no authority to ban American citizens from C’ville, doofus.”

White nationalists demonstrated twice over the summer before the “Unite the Right” rally in August that resulted in the death of 32-year-old Heather Heyerafter a car plowed into a crowd of counter protesters.

Spencer said in a video posted on Twitter that “Charlottesville 3.0 was a great success.”

“We came, we triggered, we left,” he said. “It was a great success and we’re going to do it again. It was definitely a model that should be repeated.”

Trump Brings His Message Of Hate Of The Media And Others TO Phoenix Rally

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE LOS ANGLES TIMES)

 

As protesters massed on the streets of Phoenix, President Trump on Tuesday unleashed a vitriolic, 76-minute speech mocking those who considered his response after the Charlottesville white supremacist march as racist, adopted racially charged language and hinted that he would pardon former Arizona Sheriff Joe Arpaio, long accused of brutality against Latinos.

He re-read for more than 16 minutes the remarks he had uttered after violence in Virginia claimed the life of a woman protesting the white supremacists, omitting his remarks in which he said that both sides were to blame and occupied the same plane in his view.

“The words were perfect,” he said.

But even as he sought to dismiss one racially fraught controversy, he ignited another with words that seemed to promise a pardon to Arpaio, who last month was convicted of contempt of court for refusing to halt his habit of stopping Latinos based solely on a suspicion that they might be living in the United States without proper papers.

“Do the people in this room like Sheriff Joe?” Trump asked a crowd of thousands in the Phoenix Convention Center of Arpaio, who served 24 years as Maricopa County sheriff before being defeated in November. “So was Sheriff Joe convicted for doing his job?”

“But you know what? I’ll make a prediction: I think he’s going to be just fine,” Trump said, eliciting a roar. “But I won’t do it tonight because I don’t want to cause any controversy.” He added that Arpaio should “feel good.”

Trump’s words on Arpaio, as well as his repeated suggestion that it was time to return to law and order, carried the whiff of past campaigns, such as those carried out by George Wallace, the segregationist presidential candidate and governor of Alabama.

And they suggested that it was folly for Republicans to wish for the one thing many keenly wanted — for Trump to revert to the moderate, sober president who only 24 hours earlier had acknowledged the need to change his mind on Afghanistan with a patient speech. It was clear on Tuesday, in both Trump’s rhetoric and his freewheeling, far more enthusiastic visage, that the president who came to office tossing jaw-dropping assertions at voters would continue to favor that approach as president.

He saved his greatest criticism for the media, whom he blamed for misconstruing his remarks after Charlottesville. His supporters backed him up by screaming at reporters at the rally.

“It’s time to expose the media … for their role in fomenting divisions in the country,” Trump declared.

“They are trying to take away our history and heritage … we’re smart people and these are truly dishonest people.”

He added: “I really think they don’t like our country. The only people giving a platform to these hate groups is the media itself.”

For all the mockery and bluster the president put forth, however, there was a subtext of political fear.

Recent polls have indicated that even among Republicans, Trump is losing strength. The president was introduced Tuesday with a bevy of friends — Vice President Mike Pence, preacher Franklin Graham, Martin Luther King Jr’s niece Alveda King and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson.

Their multiracial tableau seemed intended to bolster the president’s image. When he took the stage, Trump took pains to try to recreate the “silent majority” who he has long said delivered him the presidency.

“The media can attack me, but where I draw the line is where they attack you,” he said, after almost half an hour of defending himself.

He described his supporters as “honest, hard-working, taxpaying” Americans whose dreams he shared.

“You always understood what Washington, D.C., did not — our movement is a movement built on love,” he said.

The protests that greeted Trump in Phoenix were largely peaceful, although later in the night the actions grew more violent and tear gas was fired.

Still, the signs of division were many. When Trump traveled from his first stop at an immigration facility in Yuma to Phoenix, Arizona Republican Gov. Doug Ducey greeted him at the airport. But he did not attend the rally.

“Gov. Ducey’s focus has been working with law enforcement toward a safe event in downtown Phoenix,” his spokesman said in a statement to the Arizona Republic.

Trump did his best to sow division elsewhere in the state’s politics.

Beside the explosive possibility of pardoning Arpaio, Republicans here feared that Trump would use the occasion to endorse a challenger to GOP Sen. Jeff Flake, a longtime nemesis.

Trump last week praised the sole Republican challenger at the moment, former state Sen. Kelli Ward, and many here feared he would ignite an internal party conflagration that would deliver the Senate seat to Democrats.

He did not endorse Ward — or any of the other candidates considering the race — but mocked Flake and the state’s senior senator, John McCain, even after the Republican’s recent diagnosis of brain cancer.

Raising the subject of the failed GOP effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, Trump repeatedly noted that the Senate fell “just one vote away from victory after seven years of everyone proclaiming “repeal and replace.” “One vote,” he said, referring to McCain.

At that, a member of the audience screamed “traitor,” seemingly referring to the Navy veteran who spent years as a Vietnam War prisoner before going into politics.

Trump, adopting a sarcastic tone, characterizing Flake as an inconsequential senator.

“Nobody wants me to talk about him,” Trump said. “Nobody knows who the hell he is….See I haven’t mentioned any names and now everyone is happy.”

The president arrived in a state he won handily nine months ago with his administration reeling, most recently at his own hand.

The president, top aides and family members remain embroiled in a special prosecutor’s investigation into Russian influence in the November election. Unified Republican control of Washington has led to few if any major legislative victories, although he claimed again Tuesday to be the most successful president considering his first six months. A poll released here this week said only 74% of Republicans support Trump, meaning he has lost a significant quarter of his own party base.

For any previous president, that would have meant buckling down and working with Republican leaders in the Senate and the House.

Instead, true to form, Trump on Tuesday criticized the GOP leaders on Capitol Hill, obliquely. He also did something worse: not until more than an hour into his speech did he mention with any detail his own party’s prime desire this fall — tax reform.

It was a passage replete with the Trump approach. First he blasted a threatened Republican senator, Flake — whose loss would give Republicans only 51 seats, the thinnest majority — and then he suggested that Capitol Hill do his bidding.

“We need the help of Congress,” he said. Delivering no detail, he added: “We’re giving you the biggest tax cut in the history of the country.”

Both Of The White House’s ‘Business Boards’ Dump Trump Because Of His Racist Views

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON POST)

 

Trump’s business advisory councils disband as chief executives repudiate president over Charlottesville views

 August 16 at 1:24 PM

President Trump, with Senior Advisor Jared Kurshner, left, and Kenneth Frazier, Merck & Co., right, meets with manufacturing CEOs at the White House in February. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post)

President Trump’s relationship with the American business community suffered a major setback on Wednesday as the president was forced to shut down his major business advisory councils after corporate leaders repudiated his comments on the violence in Charlottesville this weekend.

Trump announced the disbanding of the two councils — the Strategy & Policy Forum and the Manufacturing Council, which hosted many of the top corporate leaders in America — amid a growing uproar by chief executives furious over Trump’s decision to equate the actions of white supremacists and protesters in remarks Tuesday at Trump Tower.

But those groups had already decided to dissolve on their own earlier in the day, a person familiar with the process said. JP Morgan Chase chief executive Jamie Dimon, a member of the “Strategy & Policy Forum,” told employees in a note on Wednesday that his group decided to disband following Trump’s bizarre press conference on Tuesday, in which he appeared to show sympathy for some of the people who marched alongside the neo-Nazis and white supremacists in Charlottesville.

“Constructive economic and regulatory policies are not enough and will not matter if we do not address the divisions in our country,” Dimon wrote his employees. ”It is a leader’s role, in business or government, to bring people together, not tear them apart.

Earlier Wednesday, the CEOs of Campbell Soup and the conglomerate 3M resigned from the manufacturing council. “Racism and murder are unequivocally reprehensible and are not morally equivalent to anything else that happened in Charlottesville,” Campbell Soup chief executive Denise Morrison said. “I believe the president should have been — and still needs to be — unambiguous on that point.”

 Play Video 3:10
6 CEOs who have distanced themselves from Trump
Kenneth C. Frazier, chief executive of Merck, is the latest CEO to resign from one of the president’s advisory councils. Here are six CEOs who have distanced themselves from the president. (Taylor Turner/The Washington Post)

General Electric chairman Jeff Immelt, who was also on the manufacturing advisory group, made a similar argument, saying in a statement that he had decided to resign after finding Trump’s comments on Tuesday “deeply troubling.”

“The Committee I joined had the intention to foster policies that promote American manufacturing and growth,” he said. “However, given the ongoing tone of the discussion, I no longer feel that this Council can accomplish these goals.”

As the number of resignations swelled, Trump announced on Twitter Wednesday afternoon that he’d shut down the councils. “Rather than putting pressure on the businesspeople of the Manufacturing Council & Strategy & Policy Forum. I am ending both,” he wrote.

The dissolution of the councils was a remarkable moment for Trump, who has made his corporate experience and ability to leverage America’s business potential as one of his chief credentials. It also marks a rapid descent for a president who has alternatively praised and attacked the decisions of corporate leaders, sometimes making unverified or false claims, and whose policy choices on issues like immigration and climate change have been criticized as anti-business.

Many corporate leaders have still stayed close to the White House, in hopes that having a voice at the table was better than none at all, and with an eye toward winning favor as Washington eyed changes to the tax code and infrastructure spending that could be worth trillions.

But Trump’s insistence that blame fell on “many sides” for the violence that occurred in Charlottesville over the weekend, which included the alleged killing of a woman by a white supremacist driving a car into a crowd of protesters, seemed to push many chief executives to reconsider their relationship.

Merck chief executive Ken Frazier, one of the few African Americans represented among the business leaders advising Trump, was the first to resign from the manufacturing council. Trump lashed out at the decision, alleging that Merck was boosting drug prices and therefore a bad corporate actor.

The decision to disband the councils offered the companies a chance to sever ties as one and not leave any firm isolated by an individual decision. Some appeared willing to wait it out on Monday and earlier Tuesday as the White House was in clean-up mode, but his press conference at Trump Tower on Tuesday afternoon proved to be a breaking point.

Johnson & Johnson chief executive Alex Gorsky, who had previously said he would remain on the manufacturing council in order to have a voice at the table, announced Trump’s latest remarks were not sustainable. “The President’s most recent statements equating those who are motivated by race-based hate with those who stand up against hatred is unacceptable and has changed our decision to participate in the White House Manufacturing Advisory Council,” Gorsky said.

 

END OF HATE: ANONYMOUS NOW IN CONTROL OF DAILY STORMER

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE ‘DAILY STORMER’ WEBSITE—AND OF ANONYMOUS)

 

END OF HATE: ANONYMOUS NOW IN CONTROL OF DAILY STORMER

#TANGODOWN

THIS SITE IS NOW UNDER THE CONTROL OF ANONYMOUS

WE HAVE TAKEN THIS SITE IN THE NAME OF HEATHER HEYER A VICTIM OF WHITE SUPREMACIST TERRORISM

FOR TOO LONG THE DAILY STORMER AND ANDREW ANGLIN HAVE SPEWED THEIR PUTRID HATE ON THIS SITE

THAT WILL NOT BE HAPPENING ANYMORE

WE HAVE ALL OF THE DETAILS ON THE SERVERS AND WILL BE RELEASING THE DATA WHEN WE FEEL THE TIME IS RIGHT

WE HAVE ALSO GATHERED LOCATIONAL DATA ON ANGLIN HIMSELF AND ARE SENDING OUR ALLIES IN LAGOS TO PAY HIM A VISIT IN PERSON

THIS EVIL CANNOT BE ALLOWED TO STAND

IT TOOK A UNITED FORCE OF ELITE HACKERS FROM AROUND THE WORLD TO BREACH THE SYSTEMS AND THE FIREWALL

WE HAVE HAD THE DAILY STORMER IN OUR SITES FOR MONTHS NOW

THE EVENTS OF CHARLOTTESVILLE ALERTED US TO THE NEED FOR IMMEDIATE ACTION

WE WANT YOU NAZIS TO KNOW: YOUR TIME IS SHORT

WE WILL ALLOW THE SITE TO REMAIN ONLINE FOR 24 HOURS SO THE WORLD CAN WITNESS THE HATE

THEN WE WILL SHUT IT DOWN

PERMANENTLY

HACKERS OF THE WORLD HAVE UNITED IN DEFENSE OF THE JEWISH PEOPLE

YOU SHOULD HAVE EXPECTED US

 

Les méditations du marcheur solitaire

Où allons-nous par cette route où nous marchons depuis des temps si longs sans demander à personne où elle mène ?

sellmark

sellmark.WordPress.com

sorryless

mellowing the harshness

World News - Different Views with Different Agendas

U.S. and World News - Take Heed that No Man Deceive You

TheCagedBirdSings

The song of a heart can never be caged...

CuriousHumans

We have no idea what we are doing

%d bloggers like this: