Iran says Canada’s sale of properties ‘unlawful’

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CHINA’S ‘SHINE’ NEWS NETWORK)

 

Iran says Canada’s sale of properties ‘unlawful’

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Iranian Foreign Ministry has said that the recent sale of Iran’s properties in Canada by the Canadian government is “unlawful,” Iran’s state TV reported on Saturday.

Based on a Canadian ruling back in 2016 and later an endorsement by the Ontario Superior Court of Justice, seized Iranian government properties worth of tens of millions of dollars have been sold in Canada and the proceeds have been handed to “victims of terrorist groups (allegedly) sponsored by Iran.”

Iranian Foreign Ministry Spokesman Abbas Mousavi on Friday dismissed the Canadian move, saying that it is “a clear breach of the international law.”

Mousavi urged the Canadian government to “immediately” return the properties and revoke the decision.

“If Ottawa fails to immediately revoke the unlawful decision and does not compensate the damage, Tehran will take action to restore its rights based on international regulations,” he was quoted as saying.

“The government of Canada will be held responsible for all the consequences,” he added.

8 of the Largest Man-Made Lakes in the World

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

8 of the Largest Man-Made Lakes in the World

Humans (and beavers) have been manipulating water flow for millennia, but it wasn’t until recently that we developed the materials we’d need to create enormous bodies of water. Once we did, we created some of the largest lakes and inland seas the Earth’s ever held. Here are eight of the largest man-made lakes in the world.

Williston Lake | British Columbia, Canada

Credit: WildLivingArts/iStock

70 Billion Cubic Meters

Williston Lake was formed in 1968 with the completion of W.A.C. Bennet Dam, blocking the Peace River and creating the largest body of freshwater in British Columbia. Besides being a huge source of electricity, the lake’s nice to look at. It’s bordered by the Cassiar Mountains to the west and the Rocky Mountains to the east, both being striking natural features. In fact, Williston Lake comes close to a fjord in some respects.

Krasnoyarsk Reservoir | Divnogorsk, Russia

Credit: Evgeny Vorobyev/Shutterstock

73.3 Billion Cubic Meters

Besides its massive size (a size that’s earned it the informal name of the Krasnoyarsk Sea), the Krasnoyarsk Reservoir’s claim to fame is being the world’s largest power plant from 1971 to 1983. In 1983, it was unseated by the Grand Coulee Dam in Washington State. The reservoir and the dam also appear on the 10 ruble bill, meaning most Russians have at least seen the thing in a picture, if not in person. A final note on the dam is the fact that a substantial section of the river below it doesn’t freeze over, even though it’s in frigid Siberia. This is because the water’s moving much too fast coming out of the dam and for miles downstream.

Manicouagan Reservoir | Quebec, Canada

Credit: Elena11/Shutterstock

138 Billion Cubic Meters

The Manicouagan Reservoir is a perfect intersection of human engineering and natural phenomena. Human engineering produced the reservoir when the Daniel-Johnson Dam was built in the 1960s. The natural aspect concerns the reservoir’s unique ring shape. The shape was created by an asteroid impact roughly 214 million years ago. That means Manicouagan Reservoir is actually a flooded crater, similar to Crater Lake (except Crater Lake is far younger and a volcano). There’s a theory that the Manicouagan crater is actually part of a multiple impact event spanning modern day North America and Europe.

Guri Reservoir | Bolivar, Venezuela

Credit: CarmeloGil/iStock

138 Billion Cubic Meters

It doesn’t look like the publicity around the Guri Reservoir is entirely good. For one, apparently the Guri Dam generates more carbon emissions than the fossil fuel alternative, which is about as hard to do as you’d think. There have also been some substantial blackouts in the 21st century, and the reservoir has a tendency to fall below optimum levels for electrical production. Still, it’s a big lake, right?

Lake Volta | Ajena, Ghana

Credit: Robert_Ford/iStock

153 Billion Cubic Meters

Just like all the other lakes on this list, Lake Volta wouldn’t be around without a dam to fill it up. In this case, it’s Akosombo Dam, built between 1961 and 1965. Interesting to note about Lake Volta, before the dam was built, the Black Volta and White Volta rivers used to meet, but once the lake started filling in, that confluence was wiped away. It’s a navigable lake, which was probably part of the point of building the dam. With it, the trip from the savanna to the coast and vice versa got a lot easier.

Bratsk Reservoir | Bratsk, Russia

Credit: fibPhoto/Shutterstock

169 Billion Cubic Meters

As much as we hate to play into stereotypes, it seems like Russians really know how to handle the cold. The Bratsk Dam was built through Siberian winters, far away from the things needed to build it, including supplies, laborers and construction support. But they did it anyway and ended up with the Bratsk Reservoir to show for it. The reservoir is on the Angara River and just to show it’s not a one-off, there are four other power-producing facilities on the same river, with stations in Irkutsk, Ust-Ilim and Boguchany.

Lake Nasser | Egypt and Sudan

Credit: Shootdiem/Shutterstock

169 Billion Cubic Meters

The construction of the Aswan High Dam, and by extension the formation of Lake Nasser, came with some uniquely Egyptian challenges. Namely, the fact that a large number of historical sites would be submerged by the filling lake, with the tombs and temples of Philae and Abu Simbel at the greatest risk. Luckily, the Egyptian government didn’t plow ahead the way other countries have been known to. The Egyptians worked with UNESCO to move the sites to higher ground.

Lake Kariba | Zambia and Zimbabwe

Credit: Lynn Yeh/Shutterstock

180 Billion Cubic Meters

The impressive Lake Kariba is an excellent example of lake creation done right. The dam produces plenty of electricity for the surrounding area, and its existence has given rise to a thriving tourism industry and also increased biodiversity. There was a short five-year period when the rate of earthquakes increased, but that hasn’t stuck around. What has is the tiger fish, tilapia, catfish and vundu, all supporting a strong fishing industry. And the water. A truly awesome amount of water has stuck around. It’s closer to an inland sea than anything else.

Ten arrested in connection with Montreal’s eighth homicide of the year

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE MONTREAL GAZETTE) 

 

Ten arrested in connection with Montreal’s eighth homicide of the year

One minor was among the 10 arrests in connection with a street fight in the Villeray district in July.

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Montreal police arrested 10 people — including one minor — on Thursday in connection with the city’s eighth homicide of the year.

According to the SPVM, the suspects reside in Montreal, Terrebonne and Boisbriand. Police apprehended the suspects after conducting searches related to the investigation on July 25 and Aug. 15.

The suspects will be questioned by investigators in the coming days.

On the morning of July 21, a man died from a head injury inflicted by a sharp object during a street fight in the Villeray district, becoming Montreal’s eighth homicide of the year.

The previous night, police drove to Louis-Hémon St. after a call was placed to 911 at 9:10 p.m.

They found two men: the 49-year-old victim and a 24-year-old man whose injuries were not life-threatening. Both were taken to a hospital.

The attackers had fled the scene by the time police arrived.

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Quebec Superior Court overturns province’s ban on homegrown cannabis

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE MONTREAL GAZETTE)

 

Quebec Superior Court overturns province’s ban on homegrown cannabis

Ruling means that Quebecers are now free to cultivate up to four cannabis plants at home without facing legal repercussions.

“As a Quebec citizen, I subscribe to the idea that it’s better to control cannabis by allowing it to be grown at home,” said Julien Fortier, the lawyer who led the challenge. ALLEN MCINNIS / MONTREAL GAZETTE

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Quebec Superior Court Judge Manon Lavoie overturned the province’s ban on homegrown cannabis on Tuesday, meaning that Quebecers are now free to cultivate cannabis at home without facing legal repercussions.

In June 2018, the provincial government passed Quebec’s cannabis law, which included provisions banning the cultivation of cannabis at home.

However, Lavoie ruled that these provisions are unconstitutional as they infringe upon the jurisdiction of the federal government, which has sole responsibility for legislating on criminal matters.

As a result, homegrown cannabis in Quebec is now regulated by Canadian law, which allows citizens to grow up to four cannabis plants.

“As a Quebec citizen, I subscribe to the idea that it’s better to control cannabis by allowing it to be grown at home,” said Julien Fortier, the lawyer who led the challenge.

Fortier took on the case after being approached by Janick Murray Hall, who wanted to bring the action to court on behalf of all those in Quebec who have been prosecuted for being in possession of cannabis plants.

According to the lawyer, Lavoie’s ruling fits with why the government opted to legalize cannabis in the first place.

“The entire idea behind the legalization of cannabis was that the government wanted to remove the production of this plant from organized crime,” Fortier said. “If you allow people to cultivate this plant themselves, that purpose would be achieved.”

Still, Fortier is urging Quebec home growers to avoid celebrating prematurely, as the provincial government has 30 days to file a petition to the Court of Appeal. In fact, he warns there is a “very strong chance” the government will seek an appeal.

“I don’t think the Quebec government will do nothing and let it slide,” he said. “Regardless, we’re looking forward to the fight.”

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3 Countries in North America No One Remembers – But Should

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

3 Countries in North America No One Remembers – But Should

When you think of North America, you probably focus on the three nations that currently occupy the continent — Canada, the United States, and Mexico — from top to bottom. And for the most part, these are the only official countries that have claimed a part of this landmass since explorers began venturing across the pond. But the reality is, many people called this continent home long before the first European scientist realized that the Earth was round and one’s ship wouldn’t fall off the side at the end of the ocean. Here are three former countries, or rather lands, that predate the current North American nations.

Cherokee Nation

A beautiful mountain valley
Credit: anthony heflin / Shutterstock.com

To be clear, while we’re highlighting countries that no longer exist, there’s a bit of ambiguity around the Cherokee Nation. The original Cherokee Nation that we’re discussing in this article references an autonomous tribal government that lived in what is now the American South before being moved to Northern Oklahoma and existed between 1794 and 1907. In addition to being composed of Cherokee Native Americans, the nation also included Cherokee freedmen (former slaves), people of the Qualla Boundary, and other Native Americans who relocated either voluntarily or were forced to because of the Trail of Tears.

After relocating to Oklahoma, the Cherokee Nation relied on cattle ranching to maintain its economy and autonomy from the U.S. government. But federal interference and refusal to lease land to Cherokee cattlemen had a negative effect. This was part of an effort to undermine tribal infrastructure and dissolve the Cherokee claim to the land so that it would be ceded back to Oklahoma during their quest for statehood. Eventually, the original Cherokee Nation government was dissolved in 1906. However, under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, a new tribal government for the modern Cherokee Nation, which still exists today, was ratified in 1938 after the passing of the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934.

Vinland

A lighthouse on a cliffside overlooking a sunset over the ocean
Credit: Scott Heaney / Shutterstock.com

Long before the British, French, Portuguese, and Spanish empires laid claim to North America, the Vikings were braving the elements to explore beyond their original homelands in Scandinavia. While not a formal country, Vinland deserves recognition because it was a settlement spearheaded by the famous Viking Leif Erikson some time around 1000 CE. To be clear, even today archeologists and historians aren’t sure where exactly Vinland existed. Experts theorize that the settlement could have been located somewhere in Eastern Canada, including Newfoundland and areas flanking the St. Lawrence Seaway.

There are conflicting theories about exact locations, and a lot of that is because of the name Vinland. In Old Norse, it translates to “Wineland.” But in the case of Newfoundland, there aren’t — nor have there ever been — any grapes growing in that region. However, there’s better evidence to suggest that areas around the St. Lawrence Seaway such as Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia, and New Brunswick are more likely options because they have thriving grape crops. Still, Vinland was a short-lived Viking experiment as references to hostile locals and the extreme distance from their homeland caused the settlement to be abandoned 10 years after its founding.

Toltec Empire

Ruins of a Toltec Empire pyramid
Credit: Lukiyanova Natalia / Shutterstock.com

Let’s move a bit south to Mexico and discuss one of the most influential Pre-Columbian cultures from the Mesoamerica period. Also known as the Toltec Kingdom, the Toltecs existed between 674 and 1122 CE. While the Toltecs don’t get a lot of attention in traditional world history classes, they impacted many of the surrounding Pre-Columbian cultures, not just in Mexico but in Central America. Most notably, many of the characteristics that we associate with Aztec culture were influenced by the Toltecs. And their architectural style of building pyramids can be found in some Mayan settlements.

The Toltecs were expert architects, weavers, metal workers and artisans. According to many historians, even their name “Toltec” came to be synonymous with “artisans.” Unfortunately, aside from the remaining ruins of their former cities like the capital of Tula (northwest of Mexico City) and artwork, little is known about the inner workings of the society. Like many cultures of this period, their writings were based on a hieroglyphic system that isn’t found on surviving buildings or artifacts.

Each of these cultures represent a fascinating aspect of North American history. And although western education tends to focus on the achievements of our European descendants, it’s important to remember the ancient cultures that came before.

China says US, Canada staged political farce on Huawei executive’s detention

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SHANGHAI CHINA NEWS AGENCY “SHINE’)

 

China says US, Canada staged political farce on Huawei executive’s detention

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China says US, Canada staged political farce on Huawei executive's detention

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Huawei chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou leaves her home to attend a court appearance in Vancouver, British Columbia, Wednesday, March 6, 2019.

The United States and Canada have echoed each other, distorted facts and staged a political farce on the matter of a Huawei senior executive’s detention, a Chinese foreign ministry spokesperson said Friday.

The remarks came after US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Canadian Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland commented on the arrest of Huawei executive Meng Wanzhou by Canada and the detention of two Canadians by China.

When meeting with the press on Thursday in Ottawa, Canada, Pompeo said that the “arbitrary detention” of two Canadian citizens in China was a “fundamentally different matter than the Canadian decision to apply the rule of law that’s consistent with the way decent nations work.”

The extradition of Meng is not a political matter, Freeland said.

Spokesperson Geng Shuang tore apart these remarks at a routine press briefing, saying the US side trumped up Meng’s case and resorted to state power to crack down on Chinese high-tech enterprises, while the Canadian side played an inglorious part in the process.

Meng’s case is a serious political incident, while the two Canadians, Michael John Kovrig and Spavor Michael Peter Todd, were arrested on suspicion of crimes against state security, Geng said.

What the United States and Canada have done to Meng is true “arbitrary detention,” he added, saying that out of pure political motivation, the two countries have abused the bilateral extradition treaty and severely violated a Chinese citizen’s legitimate rights and interests.

Geng called on other countries to be vigilant to avoid falling into the “American trap.”

He also urged Canada and the United States to earnestly deal with China’s serious concern, correct its mistakes, release Meng immediately and let her return home safe and sound.

When meeting with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Freeland on the same day, Pompeo said it is wrong that the two Canadians were being held and the US side is focused on helping them be released.

Geng refuted Pompeo’s remarks by stressing that China is a country under the rule of law, and that China’s judicial organs handle cases independently and protect the legitimate rights of Canadian citizens in accordance with the law.

“The cases of Canadian citizens have nothing to do with the United States. The US side is not entitled to make irresponsible remarks,” Geng said.

10 Most Educated Countries

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

10 Most Educated Countries

For most countries, the average education level of the population can be an indicator of its financial stability and literacy rates. It can even contribute to how healthy the country is overall. With all of this in mind, do you know which countries rank as the most educated in the world? While you might be able to guess a few, there may be some countries on the list that surprise you. Here are the top 10 most educated countries, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development.

Luxembourg

Luxembourg

Credit: querbeet/iStock

Luxembourg comes in as the smallest country to make the list. The country has only around 615,70 residents. Luxembourg is a landlocked country, surrounded by Germany, France, and Belgium. According to the OECD, 87% of adults between the ages of 25 and 34 have completed at least a secondary education (compared to the OECD average of 84%). Also, 54% of residents in this age group have completed at least some level of higher education. Maybe this has something to do with why Luxembourg comes in as the wealthiest country in the world.

Norway

Norway

Credit: Zarnell/iStock

It probably comes as no surprise that Norway ranks among the most educated countries. The European nation consistently ranks high for various quality of life factors, including healthcare, environmental awareness, and overall happiness. Colleges in Norway are tuition-free, which gives citizens greater access to higher education. The rate of adults with higher education has been increasing in Norway, and the country saw a 5% jump from 2007 to 2017. In 2017, 48% of adults aged 25 to 34 had some level of tertiary education.

Finland

Finland

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Another country with free education, this Scandinavian nation ranks among the most educated in the world. It’s not just Finnish residents that can take advantage of the free education. Non-native residents can get free schooling, as well. The Finnish education system is a stark contrast to that in the United States. Some key differences are that Finnish children receive 75 minutes of recess every day (as opposed to 27 minutes in the U.S.), there is no mandated testing until the age of 16, and most teachers stick with the same group of students for at least five years. It’s no wonder Finland has been ranked as the happiest country in the world for two years running.

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Australia

Australia

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The land down under just barely misses the top five when it comes to the percentage of adults who have a higher education. An impressive 52% of adults between the ages of 25 and 34 have completed higher education courses. The country also ranks among the highest level of citizens who have a bachelor’s degree or higher. This is despite how Australia has some of the highest tuition rates in the world.

United States of America

United States of America

Credit: Sean Pavone/iStock

Public opinion on the state of the education system in the United States varies, depending on who you ask. The country is known to have an unbelievable amount of student debt, and tuition continues to be on the rise. On the other hand, the United States has some of the best universities in the world and is one of the world’s strongest powers. So it’s probably not surprising that the U.S. comes in smack dab in the middle of the top 10 most educated countries. The U.S. Census estimates that 59% of adults have completed some college.

United Kingdom

United Kingdom

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One thing that sets the United Kingdom apart from other countries is its focus on early education. The country sees high enrollment levels for young children. Education is a top priority for citizens as reports have shown a direct correlation between education level and pay. In fact, one study found that residents with upper education earned on average 48% more than their peers without upper education. The United Kingdom is home to two of the oldest universities in the world, the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge.

South Korea

South Korea

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South Korea places high demands on its students. Consequently, the country has a high number of adults with upper education. When it comes to students graduating from secondary school, Korea ranks number one. 98% of citizens graduate from secondary education. South Korea also ranks number one for attaining tertiary education, with nearly 70% of its residents completing some higher education.

Israel

Israel

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The education system in Israel is different from those in most of the world, but it still ranks as one of the best. In Israel, most schools are divided by the student’s faith. It is also not uncommon for schools to include weapon training. Because of its strong focus on education, the country has more university degrees per capita than any other country in the world. According to the OECD, nearly 25% of all residents have a bachelor’s degree or higher.

Japan

Japan

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It may be hard to believe, but Japan does not come in at the top spot when it comes to education. Though the country is world-renowned for its education levels, it falls just short of number one. The amount of tertiary schooling comes in at a staggering 60% for adults between the age of 25 and 34. While the country has one of the highest percentages of adults expected to complete a bachelor’s degree, it has one of the lowest levels for doctorate degrees. Just 1% of its citizens are expected to attain a doctorate.

Canada

Canada

Credit: DenisTangneyJr/iStock

Canada just barely edges out Japan when it comes to adults who will complete some amount of college. A whopping 60.9% of Canadians between the age of 25 and 34 have completed some level of college, whereas that number is 60.4% in Japan. There seems to be some level of correlation between education level and happiness because Norway, Finland, and Canada all ranked among the happiest countries in the world.

6 Longest Highways on the Planet

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

6 Longest Highways on the Planet

If you’re used to traveling by car, you’re probably quite familiar with the highways in your local area. These lengthy stretches of empty roadway can seem nearly endless on long trips and are notorious for prompting complaints from the backseat. And while no roadway lasts forever, these six highways come the closest. Buckle up and prepare for an epic road trip.

6. National Highway 010 – China

Credit: Anna Frodesiak / Wikimedia

First on our list is National Highway 010, the longest highway in China. Also known as the Tongsan Expressway, this highway is over 3,500 miles long and runs through nine of China’s major provinces. A curious feature of this highway is that it’s interrupted by the Qiongzhou Strait, where cars must be ferried across the water to reach the province of Hainan. However, after decades of research, China is finally exploring new ways to subvert this problem and connect Hainan with a dedicated road-rail tunnel.

5. Golden Quadrilateral Highway Network – India

Credit: Soham Banerjee / Wikimedia

Completed in 2012, India’s Golden Quadrilateral Highway Network is the newest roadway on this list yet already stands as the fifth-longest highway in the world. Spanning over 3,600 miles, the Golden Quadrilateral Network gets its name from the shape the roads make from connecting four of India’s major metropolitan areas: Delhi in the north, Chennai in the south, Kolkata in the east, and Mumbai in the west. It was an ambitious project that ended up creating a network of highways throughout all 13 of India’s states, and it stands to this day as the country’s primary transit route for commerce, industry, and agriculture.

4. Trans-Canada Highway – Canada

Credit: FrankvandenBergh / iStock

Ranking as the fourth-longest highway in the world and the second-longest national roadway is the Trans-Canada Highway. This long, interconnected system of roadways extends 4,860 miles, running through all 10 of Canada’s provinces and joining most of the country’s major cities. The Trans-Canada Highway took 21 years to build and required over $1 billion to finish, and the final results are pretty impressive: At the time of its completion, it was the world’s longest uninterrupted highway.

Of course, it wouldn’t hold this title for long, but it does still have a few cool features that others on this list don’t. For example, electric vehicle charging stations were installed along many segments of the highway in 2012, helping owners of electric cars make their trips across the country without relying on gasoline.

3. Trans-Siberian Highway – Russia

Credit: bksrus / iStock

With a total length of over 6,800 miles, the Trans-Siberian Highway is the longest highway in Russia and the Asian continent as a whole. Comprised of seven federal highways that were built separately and combined, the Trans-Siberian Highway runs an impressive distance from St. Petersburg in Western Russia all the way to the eastern city of Vladivostok.

Unlike some other highways on this list, the Trans-Siberian Highway is a dangerous route to travel. Many of the sections are poorly-maintained and extend far into the cold Russian tundra, with few gas stations or rest areas in sight. It’s recommended that drivers make the trip only between June and September when the weather is warm and the conditions are easier—if they must make the trip at all.

2. Highway 1 – Australia

Credit: Michael R Evans / Shutterstock.com

Runner-up on our list is Highway 1 in Australia. While it’s not the longest highway in the world compared to our first place winner, Highway 1 does bear the distinction of being the longest national highway owned by any single country, so it has that going for it.

Highway 1 is just over 9,000 miles long; a series of interconnected roads that connects to all of Australia’s major state capitals by way of a giant loop that circles the entire Australian continent. Known locally as the “Big Lap,” this long highway certainly isn’t the most direct way to travel around Australia — but it’s a popular route for motorists interested in taking a scenic tour of the country.

1. Pan-American Highway – North/South America

Credit: Vadim Petrakov / Shutterstock.com

The longest highway in the world is undoubtedly the Pan-American Highway. This sprawling maze of interconnected roadways spans over 29,000 miles, beginning up north in Prudhoe Bay, Alaska, and running all the way to Ushuaia, Argentina.

Yep, that’s right—this particular highway runs nearly the entire length of North and South America combined. Motorists who travel the whole length of the highway will pass through 14 countries, two continents, and a diverse array of climates that include forests, prairies, jungles, deserts, and arctic tundra, to name a few. It’s a trip that few can claim to have made, but in terms of sheer length, this highway is second to none.

The World’s Longest Roadways

Credit: 35007 / iStock

Many of these highways are destinations for world travellers who love the road and want a challenge — but be careful on these long trips! Just because these regions are designated as “highways” doesn’t mean that they’re well-kept or safe in all areas. Make sure you do your research and prepare well in advance before tackling any of these.

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Canadian Teenage Murder Suspects Found Dead, Police Say

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE NEW YORK TIMES)

 

Canadian Teenage Murder Suspects Found Dead, Police Say

ImageRoyal Canadian Mounted Police searching for the suspects last month near Gillam in Manitoba, Canada.
Credit Manitoba Royal Canadian Mounted Police

The Canadian police said on Wednesday that they believed they had found the bodies of two teenagers suspected of killing three people in British Columbia.

Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18, had been the subject of an intense two-week manhunt that riveted the country. An autopsy was underway to confirm their identities, Assistant Commissioner Jane MacLatchy, the commanding officer of the Manitoba Royal Canadian Mounted Police, said at a news conference.

But she said the police were confident the bodies belonged to the teenagers.

The bodies were found in northern Manitoba, the police said. Assistant Commissioner MacLatchy said the investigation had a breakthrough on Friday after police officers discovered personal items belonging to the suspects on the shorelines of the Nelson River. The police also found a damaged aluminum boat.

The discovery of the personal items led the police into a dense area of brush, about a kilometer away, where they found the bodies, the assistant commissioner said.

ImageThe suspects — Kam McLeod, 19, and Bryer Schmegelsky, 18 — in surveillance footage released by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.
Credit Royal Canadian Mounted Police

The teenagers were suspects in the deaths of Leonard Dyck, a 64-year-old University of British Columbia lecturer, and a young couple: Lucas Fowler, 23, an Australian, and Chynna Deese, 24, an American.

This story is developing and will be updated soon.

9 Things You Never Knew About Canada

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

9 Things You Never Knew About Canada

With Canada Day just around the corner, what better way to celebrate the country than with some weird and wonderful facts? You may already know that the country stretches across six different time zones and has the longest coastline in the world. However, there are many other wonderful oddities that may surprise you. Read on for nine facts you never knew about the Great White North.

Canadians Love to Say ‘Sorry’

Canadians Love to Say 'Sorry'

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Canadians are so polite that they’ll say sorry even if they aren’t in the wrong. In fact, the desire to apologize is so strong that the country passed The Apology Act in 2009. The act means that if the word “sorry” is used in court, it can only be taken as an expression of sympathy or regret, not an admission of guilt.

There’s a Town Called Saint-Louis-du-Ha! Ha!

There’s a Town Called Saint-Louis-du-Ha! Ha!

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As well as being apologetic, Canadians are pretty funny. This town, in Quebec, is up there with some of the most amusing names we’ve heard. There is a little more to it than just wanting to sound amusing, though. The expression ha-ha was used in the country to explain an unexpected obstacle, in this case, nearby Lake Témiscouata. What’s more, the town is the only place name in the world with two exclamation marks. It’s so surprising, they exclaimed it twice.

Road Safety Is for Animals Too

Road Safety Is for Animals Too

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The Trans-Canada Highway boasts wildlife crossings in Banff National Park. Roaring traffic on the road doesn’t hinder big mammals crossing the road, which is highly dangerous to the mammals and drivers alike. The underpasses and overpasses in the park are used by grizzly bears, moose, lynxes and more so they can get safely to the other side.

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Canada Is Ready for Alien Invasions

Canada Is Ready for Alien Invasions

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Again, highlighting how friendly the Canadians are, in 1967, they built the world’s first UFO Landing Pad. The Centennial project was funded by the town with local businesses providing the building supplies and labor. The aim was to attract foreigners, both from this world and beyond, welcoming all visitors to the Town of St. Paul, Alberta.

There’s a Secret Underground Laboratory

There’s a Secret Underground Laboratory

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Underneath the nickel mines of Sudbury, Ontario, lies a secret underground physics laboratory. SNOLAB lies at a depth of 2 km below the surface, creating a good environment for sensitive experiments. As the deepest clean laboratory in the world, the site is used for the study of dark matter physics.

The Largest Concentration of Snakes in the World

The Largest Concentration of Snakes in the World

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If you’re afraid of snakes, then Manitoba may well not be the place for you, especially in May. The snake population in the early 2000s was dangerously low, so the Narcisse Snake Pits Wildlife Management Area was born. Today, the area has the largest population of snakes in the world, around 70,000, in fact. The most prolific are the red-sided garter snakes.

There Is a Polar Bear Prison

There Is a Polar Bear Prison

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There are plenty of polar bears in Canada. In fact, 60% of the world’s population of polar bears spend most of their time there. The town of Churchill in Manitoba is famous as a key stop-off point on their winter migration up Hudson Bay. However, there are so many bears that at times they outnumber the town’s population. With so many bears and so few people, it’s vital to keep them in check. The polar bear prison, located in a former aircraft storage hangar, is reserved for animals who don’t take the hint not to keep coming back to the town. They’re released on good behavior, of course.

Canadians Eat a Lot of Donuts

Canadians Eat a Lot of Donuts

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It may seem like a stereotype, but Canadians really do like donuts, and there’s nothing wrong with that. They love them so much, in fact, that there are more donut shops per capita than in any other country. The famous Tim Hortons brand has become synonymous with the country, building a coffee and donut community culture that keeps residents coming back for more.

Canada Has National Parks Bigger Than Entire Countries

Canada Has National Parks Bigger Than Entire Countries

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Canada is a huge country with a huge amount of national parks and, you guessed it, they’re huge. In fact, many of Canada’s national parks are bigger than entire countries. The largest of the parks, Wood Buffalo National Park in Alberta, is bigger than countries like Denmark and Switzerland. The park was created in 1922 to protect its enormous wood bison herd. Home to an intriguing array of wildlife, the park is also the last known nesting site of the endangered whooping crane.