10 U.S. States With the Largest Populations

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

10 U.S. States With the Largest Populations

America is home to more than 328 million people, but did you know that more than 53 percent live in just 10 states?

Naturally, these 10 states are home to the country’s biggest urban centers. The most popular states are, for the most part, located along the United States’ borders, giving rise to the term “flyover states” to refer to the more sparsely populated interior states.

The following population estimate numbers were obtained from the most recent count by the U.S. Census, which was completed in 2018.

10. Michigan

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With 9,995,915 residents, Michigan beats out New Jersey by more than 900,000 people to slide into the tenth spot. The auto industry in Detroit has historically been linked to population growth in the Great Lakes State. While that industry has downsized considerably, cheap real estate has recently attracted home-hungry millennials to the state.

9. North Carolina

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About 10,383,620 people call the Tarheel State home. There are lots of reasons North Carolina has grown to be such a populous state, including its temperate climate, prestigious universities, and a relatively low cost of living. Perhaps chief among them is the favorable business climate, which has drawn many employers to the state and jobs to boot. Forbes named North Carolina the Best State for Business two years in a row (2017 and 2018).

8. Georgia

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The Peach State is home to 10,519,475 people. Like North Carolina, its population blossomed between 2010 and 2018, growing a robust 8.57 percent. Close to half of the state residents, more than 5.8 million people, live in the Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell metro area. The next biggest metro area, Augusta, is home to 600,000.

7. Ohio

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The perennial swing state of Ohio has 11,689,442 million residents. While many of its traditional Rust Belt cities like Cleveland, Dayton, and Akron have seen shrinking populations, the capital city of Columbus has boomed, growing more than 11 percent since 2010.

6. Illinois

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Buoyed by Chicago, the country’s third-most populous city, The Land of Lincoln is home to 12,741,080 people. Of all the states in the top 10, Illinois is the only one that actually shrunk during the last eight years. The state shed 0.71 percent of its population, the equivalent of over 90,000 people.

5. Pennsylvania

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The Quaker State grew at a snail’s pace of 0.82 percent over the last eight years, but it was enough to take the fifth-place spot from Illinois. Pennsylvania is now home to an estimated 12,807,060 people.

4. New York

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From the top of the Adirondacks to the hot dog stands of Coney Island, about 19,542,209 people call the Empire State home. A big chunk of them, about 44 percent of the state’s population, live in close proximity to each other in New York City.

3. Florida

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Florida is the second-fastest growing state on the list, boosting its population by 13.27 percent over the last eight years. That brings the state’s total population to about 21,299,325 people. A steady flood of retiring Baby Boomers has given a bump to the Sunshine State’s growth.

2. Texas

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Everything is bigger in Texas, including population growth. The Lone Star State is the fastest-growing state in the country, expanding its population at a rate of 14.14 percent since the last census tally and is now home to 28,701,845 million people.

Texas’ growth is powered by its cities. Houston, San Antonio, and Dallas all have a spot in the top 10 most populous cities in the country. Austin is right behind in 11th place. All told, some 6 million Texans live in it four biggest cities.

1. California

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Apparently, everybody wants to move to California, and for good reason. Not only is the California economy the largest in the nation, but if California were a country, it would have the fifth largest economy in the world.

The Golden State grew more than 6 percent from 2010 to 2018, reaching a population of 39,557,045 people. It is also the third-largest state by area, covering more than 163,000 square miles. That gives California even more room to grow.

Some people, however, think California should be broken up into three smaller states. Activists came close to getting a referendum to break up California on the ballot in 2018. Proponents argued that the proposal would allow all residents to obtain better infrastructure, better education, and lower taxes, according to venture capitalist Tim Draper who sponsored the failed measure. It would also give the people more representation in the U.S. Senate, giving the population within its boundaries six senators instead of just two.

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4 Newest U.S. National Parks

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

Newest National Parks

The National Park System dates back to 1872. Since Yellowstone became the first national park, dozens of locations have been recognized as well (61 total, as of 2019, though there are 419 NPS-operated units like national monuments and historic sites). However, new parks are few and far between. The most recent four were established between 2004 and 2019 (yes, a new national park was added to the list this year!) Every now and again, the United States sees a reason to add to the list. Be sure to grab a park pass and go visit. Here are the four newest national parks.

Great Sand Dunes National Park

Great Sand Dunes National Park

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Established as a national park in September 2004, the Great Sand Dunes preserve is located in Colorado. The large sand dunes tower at up to 750 feet on the eastern edge of the San Luis Valley. The park has the tallest sand dunes in North America, spanning an area of about 30 square miles. Evidence of human habitation in the sandy park and its surrounding valleys dates back about 11,000 years. The first people known to inhabit the area were the Southern Ute Tribe. Apaches and Navajo also have cultural connections to the dunes area.

Pinnacles National Park

Pinnacles National Park

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With the most national parks in the nation (and some of the oldest and best), you may have overlooked California’s most recent addition to the National Park Service inventory: Pinnacles National Park. Located mid-state toward the coast, Pinnacles protects the mountainous area east of the Salinas Valley, a prominent farming community. The national park is divided by rock formations, which are only connected by foot trails. Pinnacles has a long history as public land, despite being established as a national park by President Barack Obama in 2013. It was originally established as a national monument by President Theodore Roosevelt in 1908. The most developed areas of the park are on its East side, but Pinnacles still offers mostly pristine wilderness.

Gateway Arch National Park

Gateway Arch National Park

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You may have missed it in the news, but the St. Louis Gateway Arch was designated as a national park after many years as a national memorial in 2018. The city-defining Gateway Arch is a 630-foot monument that was completed in 1965 and is known as The Gateway to the West. The memorial was initially established to commemorate the Louisiana Purchase and subsequent westward movement of American explorers and pioneers, as well as the first civil government west of the Mississippi. Today, there is a museum on the 91-acre property as well.

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Indiana Dunes National Park

Indiana Dunes National Park

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On the shores of Lake Michigan is the newest national park in the U.S., the Indiana Dunes, authorized by Congress as a national lakeshore in 1966 and upgraded to national park status on Feb. 15, 2019. Containing approximately 15,000 acres of land, the park runs for nearly 25 miles along the lake’s southern shore. It’s Indiana’s first national park, and contains a surprising amount of rare plants and animals, some of which are on the federal list of threatened and endangered species (Mead’s milkweed and Pitcher’s thistle among them). The park is more than just sand dunes, too. You’ll find wetland, prairie, river and forest ecosystems.

5 Fastest Growing U.S. Cities

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

Fastest Growing U.S. Cities

For jobs, lifestyle choices, weather, cost of living, retirement — you name it — we’re moving a lot. Using census data, trends surveys rely on myriad criteria and methodology to determine the fastest growing areas, often breaking down information based on small, medium and large cities. Not to mention use of precise definitions for metropolitan statistical areas, metropolitan divisions and so on. Confused yet? Not to worry. The overall trends are driven by a few easy to understand factors.

People are still moving to take jobs in coastal tech hubs. Then there are inland cities growing due to “tech dislocation,” places with rapid tech sector growth due to the exodus of workforces from more expensive cities. Another huge factor is retirement (think Florida and Arizona). Note that the cities on this list are all large, and made the top five based on pure volume of growth. Meanwhile, many small and medium cities had a higher percentage of growth. Based solely on overall growth numbers released in May by the United States Census Bureau, the five fastest growing cities in the country are highlighted below.

Los Angeles, California

Los Angeles, California

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Perhaps the poster child for urban sprawl, Los Angeles grew by 18,643 people since the last annual count, for a total 2017 population of 3,999,759. That’s just over 50 people per day. With a mild year-round climate of near-perpetual sun, weather has to be one of the biggest enticements for new residents. The Southern California mega-city has long been a draw for free spirits, artists and aspiring actors, along with being a domestic melting pot with large Hispanic and Asian populations. Hollywood, the center of the television and film industry in the U.S., accounts for much of the city’s industry, along with the music biz.

Fort Worth, Texas

Fort Worth, Texas

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With its recent growth, Fort Worth has overtaken Indianapolis, Indiana, to become the 15th largest city in the country. For a city that started as a trading post for cowboys at the end of the Chisholm Trail, Fort Worth has come a long way. The city in North Central Texas grew by 18,644 for a total population of 874,168. Cowboy heritage is retained here, where the Fort Worth Stockyards are still home to some of the nation’s largest rodeo events, and the National Cowgirl Museum and Hall of Fame honors early pioneers. It’s not all about country culture, however, as this metropolitan city is home to international art institutes like the Kimbell Art  Museum. Considering a move or visit to Fort Worth? A great resource is the city’s website, fortworthtexas.gov.

Dallas, Texas

Dallas, Texas

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Long the commercial and cultural hub of north Texas, Dallas is a modern metropolis sprouted from western roots. After all, the city’s NFL franchise is called the Cowboys. The culture and charm of Dallas — which grew by 18,935 to an overall population of 1,341,075 — are highlighted by the Lake and Garden district in East Dallas (parks, lakes, an arboretum and gardens), Deep Ellum (a former warehouse district turned nightlife hotspot), the Arts District (largest urban arts district in the nation, in the core of downtown) and Highland Park (high-end shopping and dining in North Dallas). Potential Dallas transplants and visitors will find great information at the visitdallas.com.

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Phoenix, Arizona

Phoenix, Arizona

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The capital of Arizona, Phoenix grew by 24,036 residents to reach a population of 1,626,078. Retirement and the resort lifestyle are keys to the area’s growth, with aging baby boomers flocking for year-round sun and warmth. Ritzy resort spas and world-class golf courses, among them a Jack Nicklaus design, are attractive to a crowd with plenty of expendable income and leisure time. Beyond the country club gates, Phoenix offers everyone cultural pursuits, with a vibrant nightlife fueled by glitzy nightclubs and dive bars alike, along with a cosmopolitan culinary scene. Spring training baseball and abundant outdoor recreation are additional draws, while the city’s Desert Botanical Garden showcases the abundance of life that flourishes amidst harsh growing conditions, with displays of hearty cacti and native plant species.

San Antonio, Texas

San Antonio, Texas

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Whether or not they “remember the Alamo,” folks are flocking to San Antonio, which grew by 24,208 to reach a population of 1,511,946. The major city in south-central Texas is steeped in colonial history, including the Alamo, the 18th-century Spanish mission preserved as a museum to commemorate the infamous 1836 battle for Texan independence from Mexico. Tracing the contours of the San Antonio River for miles through the heart of the city, San Antonio’s River Walk is its most prominent modern landmark, an alluring pedestrian promenade of shops, restaurants and bars. Future residents and vacationers can grab a great perspective on the city atop the 750-foot tall Tower of the Americas, which overlooks the entire city from its location in HemisFair Park.

7 Scenic Coastal California Parks

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

7 Scenic Coastal California Parks

In many parts of the U.S., winter is still hanging on by its icy fingertips, causing us all to do a lot of California dreaming. We can do more than dream, though – we can actually go to California and enjoy some warm, sunny weather! If you are heading that way, be sure to check out these seven scenic coastal California parks, each with its own unique type of beauty that you won’t want to miss.

Año Nuevo State Park

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The first park on our list offers something truly incredible. Between December and April every year, Año Nuevo State Park welcomes home nearly 10,000 elephant seals, who return to the beach to breed, have babies and molt. Long-term visitors can watch an entire lifetime play out before their eyes, something that you just can’t get anywhere else. The park’s “coastal terrace prairie landscape,” dune fields and wetland marshes are also home to endangered animals like the San Francisco Garter Snake and the California Red-legged Frog.

Limekiln State Park

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California is famous for its enormous redwood trees. If they’re the reason you are headed to California, make sure to check out Limekiln State Park, where there is an entire forest full of them. With 24 campsites, this park is a perfect place to spend a few days enjoying nature and taking in the beauty of the Big Sur Coast, where you might even be lucky enough to spot an otter, or even a few migrating whales.

Angel Island State Park

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If you are looking for a little history in addition to spectacular ocean views, then Angel Island State Park is right up your alley. Referred to as the “Ellis Island of the West,” this park in San Francisco Bay saw the arrival of 175,000 Chinese and 60,000 Japanese immigrants between 1910 and 1940. Long before that, though, it was a hunting ground for Native Americans. During the Cold War, it was home to a missile base and radar control station. Now, the park holds overnight educational programs so children can learn about all of this history and more.

Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park

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Pfeiffer Big Sur State Park offers some truly amazing views. The high cliffs of the Santa Lucia Mountains meet the sea here at this park, where you can walk amongst the giant redwoods, oak trees, sycamores, cottonwoods, alders, willows, conifers and maple trees as you follow the winding Big Sur River. Campers who spend the night here often see bobcats, raccoons and several species of rare birds.

Morro Bay State Park

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Morro Bay State Park is an interesting place to spend an afternoon. It has a preserve featuring a large lagoon and the impressive Morro Rock, a volcanic plug formed 23 million years ago by volcanoes that have long since gone extinct. It also has a golf course, a museum and a marina, and is home to hundreds of species of birds you could spend all day watching. From November to February, visitors can also visit the butterfly grove to see a flock of monarchs in their roost.

Montaña de Oro State Park

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Montaña de Oro State Park has a little something for everyone. For aspiring cowboys and cowgirls, there are high, rugged cliffs, canyons, streams and hills, all of which you can explore on horseback as you follow the park’s winding trails. For those who prefer the beach, there are large coastal plains, secluded beaches and tide pools. And for everyone else, there are huge, rolling fields of wildflowers to gaze at as you marvel at nature’s beauty.

Point Lobos State Natural Reserve

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The last entry on our list may just be the best of all. The Point Lobos State Natural Reserve is not only stunning to look at it with its ocean views and scenic backdrops, but it’s also of great scientific importance. It is home to several rare plant communities, as well as to communities of otters, seals, sea lions and migrating whales. It is also home to a few endangered archaeological sites that can enlighten future generations about how our ancestors lived. This park, dubbed “the crown jewel of the State Park System,” combines beach coves with rolling meadows and plant life from both the ocean and the land surrounding it, making it a great place to explore.

4 Overlooked U.S. Beach Towns to Visit This Summer

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

4 Overlooked U.S. Beach Towns to Visit This Summer

When summer heat hits, a tranquil beach getaway is just what the doctor ordered. Avoid getting someone else’s sand on your blanket and plan a visit to one of these overlooked beach towns this summer, where relaxation is high and crowds are low.

Gloucester, Massachusetts

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This hidden gem is well-known by locals and art lovers alike. Gloucester calls itself the “oldest working art colony in North America” and has no shortage of artistic representation. Visit one of the beach town’s many art galleries or pop on over to the weekly Cape Ann Farmers Market for some fresh produce and live music. Home to America’s oldest seaport, the cuisine in Gloucester is a seafood lover’s dream. Summer is also the best time to spot whales on one of the many whale-watching tours that depart from the town’s port.

Jensen Beach, Florida

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Share the beach with turtles instead of tourists at Jensen Beach, Florida, where the sands every year are home to a huge number of nesting sea turtles. During the months of June and July, visitors can even go on guided sea turtle walks each night led by the Florida Oceanographic Society. Jensen Beach Causeway Park is a popular spot for a picnic or a kayak launch, and offers great fishing as well as beach access. Grab a quick drink or a vitamin-packed açai bowl at the Bunkhouse Coffee Bar and enjoy the local wildlife — which in this case means wild birds and manatees.

Carmel-by-the-Sea, California

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Located right next to the popular Pebble Beach, Carmel-by-the-Sea is much less crowded but no less beautiful than its neighbor. Enjoy the flavors of Monterey County at one of its many wine tasting roomsor take in the gorgeous views on a wildlife hike. The Carmel River State Beach has launch spots for kayaking and scuba diving and is a great location to spot various wild bird species preening by the lagoon. No matter what your style, this fairytale village has something to suit everyone — and at only one square mile, it’s easy enough to explore everything this romantic little town has to offer.

Harpswell, Maine

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If you’re longing for a glimpse into seacoast life, look no further than Harpswell, Maine. Situated about 45 minutes outside of bustling Portland, this historic region is made up of almost 200 tiny islands, some of which are only accessible by boat. Learn to sail, take a kayak tour or relax on a yacht as you explore the coast. With fewer attractions than other coastal towns, Harpswell is perfect for those who want to relax in solitude and enjoy the area’s natural beauty. Join in the Harpswell Hiking Challenge on the first weekend of June to hike the views of Casco Bay or simply relax and take in the calm ambience of rural Maine.

Make a Pit Stop at These 5 Wacky Roadside Attractions

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

Make a Pit Stop at These 5 Wacky Roadside Attractions

The classic road trip is one of America’s quintessential summer activities. It calls for curated music, a well-stocked snack supply, and of course, ample stops at the wacky roadside attractions that decorate our nation’s highways. No summer road trip would be complete without a visit to these intriguing—and in some cases, downright odd—places that are just an interstate exit away.

Carhenge

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Where to see it: Alliance, Nebraska

Who needs a trip to the U.K. to see Stonehenge when Alliance, Nebraska, has something even better? This wacky monument is an homage to vintage American vehicles, all painted gray to look like the stones of the famous ancient site. The artist, Jim Reinders, enjoys experimenting with unusual and interesting concepts within his art installations. He wanted to copy Stonehenge after living in England for some time, and with that, Carhenge was born. Using 39 vehicles that assume the same proportions of Stonehenge, Carhenge is approximately 96 feet wide. Located off Highway 87, Carhenge attracts plenty of summer tourists each year. There is a gift shop in case you want a commemorative magnet or postcard to mark your visit to this wacky roadside attraction.

The Tree of Utah

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Where to see it: Great Salt Lake Desert, Utah

Created by Swedish artist Karl Momen in the 1980s, you can find this large-scale art installation in the Great Salt Lake Desert of Utah, just off Interstate 80. About 25 miles north of the town of Wendover and halfway between the now abandoned railroad communities of Arinosa and Varro, the artists created the sculpture as an ode to life. The Tree of Utah is over 80 feet tall and can withstand desert winds up to 130 mph, tornados, or earthquakes. It is one of the most resilient art structures in the world.

Local highway patrol estimates that 2 million cars travel past the Tree of Utah annually. On average, five cars an hour stop to gaze at Momen’s construction and ponder the meaning of life. The Tree of Utah is made mainly of concrete but has six spheres coated with natural rock and minerals native to Utah. It’s said that Momen had a vision of it while driving across the Bonneville Salt Flats.

Sun Tunnels

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Where to see it: Great Salt Lake Desert, Utah

If you are up near Wendover, Utah, it’s worth the trip to head over to Nancy Holt’s tunnel art installation as well. These four large concrete tubes, completed in 1986, form an open-X shape on the dried Great Salt Lake bed. The 18-foot long concrete tunnels are tall enough that you will not need to duck when you go inside. These tunnels have holes of varying sizes drilled into them that replicate constellations and allow visitors to gaze at the heavens.

Holt’s focus on the changing degrees of light show different shadow forms inside the tunnels. This enables visitors to “bring the vast space of the desert back to human scale.” During the summer and winter solstices, check out the sunset on the horizon, centered through the tunnels. Holt’s work is considered one of the most defining installations of “land-art” and has largely defined her career.

Enchanted Highway

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Where to see it: Southwestern North Dakota

A collection of large art installations dot the landscape of North Dakota, making the Enchanted Highway an ideal roadside attraction to add to your list. This stretch of highway features metal sculptures of local prairie animals. There are also nods to the local indigenous culture and history of the region. Visitors to this wacky roadside attraction can even enjoy an entire collection featuring Teddy Roosevelt, which has a horse-drawn carriage. Alternatively, check out the World’s Largest Tin Family made completely from empty oil drums. Head over to Highway 94 at Gladstone and enjoy over 30 miles of very unusual art.

Salvation Mountain

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Where to see it: Southern California

This unusual roadside attraction is in the remote desert of Southern California and located less than 100 miles from Palm Springs. Salvation Mountain is the life’s work of local resident Leonard Knight. Knight wanted to illustrate his love and devotion to his faith and wanted to make sure the world could see it. Murals, messages, and imagery that depict Christian Bible verses cover the mountain in colorful paint. Make sure you avoid visiting Salvation Mountain in the summertime, as temperatures in the region can exceed 100F. This attraction took Knight almost three decades to complete and has used over half a million gallons of paint.

With more than 4 million miles of roads and highways that crisscross the country, you are sure to be within driving distance of these quirky and unusual roadside attractions. So the next time you’re feeling a little worn or need something extraordinary to spark your imagination, stop by for a visit.

These U.S. states consume the most coffee

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

These U.S. states consume the most coffee

In 2018, Americans drank an average of 2 cups of coffee per day. The USDA forecasts 174.5 million bags of coffee will be produced in 2019 and lists the United States as the 2nd largest importer of coffee in the world. Across the country, we consume 25,835,000 bags of coffee.

We are a highly caffeinated nation.

We are merely doing our civil duty — after the Boston Tea Party, drinking coffee was a sign of patriotism. Since then, the popularity of coffee in the U.S. has only grown. The National Coffee Association’s annual report showed coffee drinking in America is at its highest levels with over 60% of all Americans consuming coffee every day.

Coffee in the Pacific Northwest

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It would be very difficult to discuss coffee in America without Seattle, Washington. Seattle might be the origin story for Starbucks, but Conde Naste doesn’t list it in their top 10 best Seattle coffee shops. Still, cities all over Washington are listed in the top 10 best cities in America for coffee lovers on many lists.

Here are some quick stats on Washington’s caffeine addiction:

Seattle, Washington:

  • 1 coffee shop per 2,308 residents
  • 278 coffee shops total

Everett, Washington:

  • 1 coffee shop per 2,752 residents
  • 40 coffee shops total

Vancouver, Washington:

  • 1 coffee shop per 2,224 residents
  • 78 coffee shops total

Travel & Leisure listed Portland, Oregon, the best coffee city due to its high number of coffee shops per capita. Portland also has the most coffee manufacturers per capita than anywhere else in the United States.

Coffee in New York City

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Frank Sinatra crooned he wanted “to wake up in the city that never sleeps.” With the most coffee shops per capita, the most donut shops per capita and the most affordable coffee shops per capita, New York fits the bill and is WalletHub’s #1 choice for “Best Coffee Cities in America.”

Coffee in California

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The west coast is a standout region for coffee drinkers. WalletHub found 4 of the top 5 cities for highest average coffee spend are in California: Fremont, Irvin, San Francisco and San Jose. California also holds 3 out of the 5 cities with the highest percentage of adult coffee drinkers as well: Anaheim, Los Angeles and Santa Ana.

Apartment Guide released a list of best cities for coffee lovers in America and Berkley was their top pick.

Coffee consumption in the Southeast

Nowhere in the southeastern corner of the U.S. makes any list of “cities with the most coffee shops” or “states with the highest coffee consumption.” The northeastern United States consumes the most coffee, according to Statista.

More coffee statistics

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  • If you love to grab coffee on the way to work, don’t move to Laredo, Corpus Christi and Garland, Texas. They have the fewest coffee shops per capita, alongside Hialeah, Florida, and San Bernardino, California.
  • Despite having so few coffee shops, Hialeah has the 3rd highest percentage of adult coffee drinkers.
  • Square analyzed data over the course of a year and found the latte is America’s most-ordered drink.
  • More than 60% of adults 18 and over consume coffee every day. And more than half of the coffee consumed is gourmet. Cold brew orders are up 42% over iced coffee.

With younger people driving the gourmet coffee market and 70% of coffee consumption happening at home, surely we can get a good Alexa-enabled coffee pot worth more than a hill of beans.

5 Biggest Chinatowns in the U.S.

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

5 Biggest Chinatowns in the U.S.

If you don’t live near a big city, you might be unfamiliar with the term “Chinatown” and its significance in American history.

The Oxford Dictionary defines a Chinatown as: “A district of a large non-Chinese town or port in which the population is predominantly of Chinese origin.” So-called Chinatowns exist all around the world, though there are particularly large concentrations in North America, Europe, and Australia.

While Chinatowns had existed in other countries for hundreds of years before making their way to the U.S., the United States features a particularly high number of Chinatowns relative to its size. Here are a few of the biggest Chinatowns you’ll find in the states.

5. Honolulu, Hawaii

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While the exact boundary (and thus, the exact population) of the Honolulu Chinatown isn’t precisely known, it deserves mention on this list for its historical role in Chinese-American culture.

One of the earlier Chinatown settlements, Chinese immigrants came to Hawaii to work the island’s rich sugar plantations. Many of these laborers stayed in the area to work as merchants, and eventually, the early boundaries of Hawaii’s first Chinatown began to form. Of course, the area wasn’t without hardship—the Honolulu Chinatown was rocked by a great fire in 1886, an outbreak of bubonic plague in 1899, and another huge blaze in 1900. But the area endured, and it stands today as the home of the largest Chinese population in Hawaii.

4. Seattle, Washington

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Further north than most other U.S. Chinatowns, the Seattle Chinatown — more officially known as the Chinatown-International District of Seattle — is the biggest Chinese enclave in the American northwest. Home to a diverse range of Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, and Vietnamese populations, the area acts as a hub of Asian culture in the region and brings in substantial tourism throughout the year.

3. Chicago, Illinois

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The second-oldest in the United States, the Chinatown neighborhood in south Chicago is certainly worth visiting. The bulk of the Chicago Chinatown population came from immigrants fleeing persecution on the West Coast; the establishment of the San Francisco Chinatown (as detailed below) made Chinese culture a staple in America, but the immigrants there faced extensive prejudice from U.S. nationals.

In an ironic twist, U.S. citizens viewed Chinese influence as a detriment to American culture, despite the fact that American culture (not even 100 years old at that point) had its foundation in African slave labor and Native American blood. Regardless, immigrants found some relief in their newly-formed Chinatown, where it stands today as one of the most populous Chinese enclaves in the country.

2. San Francisco, California

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The San Francisco Chinatown is possibly the largest, and certainly the oldest, Chinese enclave in America. Its origins date back to the 1850s, when large influxes of Chinese immigrants made their way to the West Coast. These immigrants typically worked hard-labor jobs, such as mining or railroad construction, and struggled to integrate into American culture. As their populations grew, so too did their enterprise, with Chinese-owned shops, restaurants, and apartments filling the town. This gentrification led to the birth of the United States’ first Chinatown, a historic landmark that exists to this day.

1. Manhattan, New York

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The Manhattan Chinatown is one of the biggest in the world, with the New York City area featuring the biggest Chinese population outside of Asia. Indeed, there are so many Chinese people there that one Chinatown can’t hold everyone; to date, there are nine different Chinatown neighborhoods in New York City alone.

This particular Chinatown is considered a bastion of Chinese culture, both in the U.S. and abroad. The region is home to the Museum of Chinese in America and is a regular destination for new Chinese immigrants coming to the country. However, in true Manhattan fashion, rent prices are skyrocketing in the area, forcing out many of the poorer populations in favor of wealthier patrons who can afford the exorbitant prices.

Going Down to Chinatown

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This list is just a small sampling of the diverse Chinatowns that exist in America. The enclaves have long been thought of as cultural oddities to natives, but to Chinese immigrants, they’re welcome reminders of the comfort and culture they left behind. And while most Chinatowns these days have experienced surges in diversity compared to what they once had, there’s no taking away from the cultural impact they’ve had on our history.

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Kamala Harris proposes $100 billion plan for black homeownership

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF POLITICO NEWS)
(OPED: Senator Harris wants to talk about anti-discrimination yet at the same time wants totally discrimination type laws for the purpose of helping out only one race of people. She is a total hypocrite in her propaganda. Besides she isn’t even a black person even though the keps portraying herself to be so. Her parents are from India and Jamaica, all of the folks that I have ever come across from Jamaica very much get upset if they are referred to as being Blacks. I hope and pray that this 2020 election cycle does not end up being a race issue election.)(Harris also pledged to work to expand HUD’s fair housing program, strengthen anti-discrimination laws.)(I agree with helping poor Black families out but only if all poor families are helped out, not to pick and choose by the color of skin.)(oldpoet56)(The far left Democrats like to talk about reverse discrimination and reverse racism, there is no such thing folks, all racism is racism, all discrimination is discrimination!)

2020 ELECTIONS

Kamala Harris proposes $100 billion plan for black homeownership

Updated 

Kamala Harris, calling on the nation to “deal with the racial wealth gap,” on Saturday proposed a $100 billion federal program to help black people buy homes.

The California senator said the plan, which would provide down payment and closing cost assistance of up to $25,000 to people renting or living in historically red-lined communities, would help some 4 million home-buyers.

The plan’s release comes as Harris surges in Democratic presidential primary polls following a debate last week in which she chastised former Vice President Joe Biden for his past opposition to busing and former associations with segregationist senators. The controversy has continued in recent days, with Biden defending his record.

Black voters are a critical constituency in the Democratic primary, especially in the South.

Harris, speaking at the Essence Festival in New Orleans, said her program would “put homeownership within the reach” of millions of families.

“A typical black family has just $10 of wealth for every $100 held by a white family,” she said. “So we must right that wrong and, after generations of discrimination, give black families a real shot at homeownership — historically one of the most powerful drivers of wealth in our country.”

Harris’ housing program would come in the form of U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development grants limited to families with incomes up to $100,000, or $125,000 in high-cost areas.

Democrats concerned about income and racial inequality in the United States have long pointed to the lasting effects of red-lining — and persistent gaps in the rates of black and white homeownership, a traditional means of building wealth.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a fellow 2020 contender, previously proposed providing down payment grants to first-time homebuyers in formerly red-lined, segregated and lower-income areas.

On Saturday, Harris also pledged to work to expand HUD’s fair housing program, strengthen anti-discrimination lending laws and amend the Fair Credit Reporting Act to require that credit scores include rent, phone and utility payments.

8 Creepiest Places on the Planet

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

8

Creepiest Places on the Planet

There is no shortage of downright spooky spots to visit. You could easily spend years traveling to some of the most haunted and bone-chilling sites around the world. To get you started, here are eight of the creepiest places on the planet.

Winchester Mystery House

Winchester Mystery House

Credit: Uladzik Kryhin/Shutterstock

If you’re in San Jose, California, you can visit the Winchester Mystery House, one of the strangest buildings you’ll ever enter. When Sarah Winchester lost her husband and child, a psychic told her that the family was haunted by spirits from all those who were killed by Winchester guns. To appease the spirits, she needed to build a home according to the spirits’ requests, and as long as construction continued, she would be left alive. The home now has 160 rooms, 10,000 windows, 2,000 doors, six kitchens, 47 fireplaces and 47 staircases.

Dargavs

Dargavs

Credit: StasEtvesh/Shutterstock

The village of Dargavs in Russia looks like a quaint hillside establishment at first glance. However, it’s actually the City of the Dead, where people buried their loved ones along with their personal belongings and clothes. There are many legends surrounding the place, including one suggesting that locals would not go here, because they believed they would not come out alive.

Sedlec Ossuary

Sedlec Ossuary

Credit: Aleksandr Vrubleviskiy/Shutterstock

From the outside, this Roman Catholic Church in the Czech Republic appears perfectly normal, but once you step inside, that all changes. The chapel is quite unique, considering that its décor is comprised of human bones from an estimated 40,000 bodies. And don’t miss the chandelier at Sedlec Ossuary, which is said to contain at least one of every bone found in the human body.

Door to Hell

Door to Hell

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The Darvaza gas crater in Turkmenistan is more commonly known as the “Door to Hell.” It’s a massive, 230-foot-wide crater that was created when scientists drilling for natural gas had their rig collapse. They set it on fire out of concern for spreading poisonous methane gas. That was in 1971 and the crater still burns today.

Pripyat

Pripyat

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Pripyat is the abandoned town near Chernobyl that was quickly evacuated after the explosion in 1986. It’s still too radioactive to be habitable as a functioning city and remains a snapshot of life in the Soviet Union during the 80s.

Paris Catacombs

Paris Catacombs

Credit: Wyatt Rivard/Shutterstock

In the 17th and 18th centuries, Paris’ cemeteries were so full that corpses had become uncovered and the ground was caving in at certain spots. The solution was to place bodies in limestone tunnels that existed for centuries below the city. The burials have since ended, but there are around six million bodies buried in the Paris catacombs.

Hoia Baciu Forest

Hoia Baciu Forest

Credit: Daniel Marian/Shutterstock

The Hoia Baciu Forest is often called the Bermuda Triangle of Romania and is said to be the world’s most haunted forest thanks to its reputation for paranormal activity and other unexplained happenings. Some of these include unexplained disappearances, faces appearing in photographs that were not seen with the naked eye, ghost sightings and even UFO sightings in the 70s. If this isn’t all creepy enough, the vegetation takes on a bizarre appearance here, and visitors report strong feelings of anxiety when visiting.

Island of the Dolls

Island of the Dolls

Credit: avf71/Shutterstock

The iconic canals of Xochimilco near Mexico City are stunning, but you’ll also find there is a dark side, at least on one of the artificial islands. Legend has it that caretaker Don Julian Santana Barrera witnessed a little girl drowning in the canal but was unable to save her. Her doll floated up to the island and he hung it in the trees to pay respects. Some say dolls kept washing ashore, and he continued to hang them as a vigil until he was found dead years later in the same spot where she died.

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