5 Lakes That Are Disappearing Before Our Eyes

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

5 Lakes That Are Disappearing Before Our Eyes

Most people know that water is a precious resource. Between climate change and the needs of the world’s ever-growing population, water is vanishing more and more rapidly. Many bodies of water around the world aren’t what they once were. You may even be aware of water shortages in your area. And while some water sources are gradually diminishing, other cases are much more dramatic. The following are five lakes that are tragically disappearing before our eyes.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Dead Sea — Israel and Jordan

The Dead Sea — Israel and Jordan

Credit: aeduard/ iStock

The Dead Sea is a remarkable place for many reasons. Tourists flock to the area because you can swim in the sea and float due to the salinity of the water. The salt and mineral-rich mud are known for their health benefits, another big draw. The Dead Sea is also the lowest place on Earth at 430.5 meters (or 1,412 feet) below sea level!

Unfortunately, the water level is decreasing by about a meter per year. The water loss is primarily due to the fact that one of its main water sources, the Jordan River, was dammed in the 1960s. As the population grows, water from this river goes to maintaining crops and supporting the human community in the region. And because of the tense political climate, the potential solution of creating a pipeline from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea has been hard to implement. There’s still a lot of water left in the Dead Sea, but if you want to see this anomaly of nature and float in the water yourself, you might be smart to go sooner rather than later.

Lake Poopó — Bolivia

Lake Poopó — Bolivia

Credit: FernandoPodolski/ iStock

Lake Poopó is a tragic example of what can happen when humans divert too much water from a lake. This lake was once the second-largest lake in Bolivia, but now it’s all but completely dried up. Some stark aerial photos from NASA show the lake is virtually gone. This is a huge loss considering the lake saw highs of up to 3,000 square kilometers (1,200 square miles). Since the lake was always shallow, the locals are used to fluctuations in the size of the lake.

The current disappearance is not good news for the local communities that rely on the lake for fish. However, those who have been in the area for a long time have seen this before. The lake dried up entirely in 1994 because of drought and evaporation, and eventually replenished itself. So there is hope that the lake will fill back up, and the ecosystem will eventually rebuild. The rainy season in Bolivia is from December to March, so if the drought doesn’t drag on, the lake could potentially fill back up.

The Aral Sea — Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan

The Aral Sea — Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan

Credit: Daniel Prudek/ Shutterstock

This sea that lies on the border of Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan used to be the fourth-largest lake in the world, with only Lakes Superior, Victoria, and the Caspian Sea being larger. But when the water was diverted in the 1970s, the lake slowly began to dry up, and now only 10% of the water remains. The disappearance of the water is especially distressing for communities that used to live off of the fishing industry. The BBC describes the demise of this sea as “one of the most dramatic alterations of the Earth’s surface for centuries.”

A visual reminder of the death of this lake, perhaps for people who weren’t alive before the 1970s when the lake was full, are the stranded ships that accidentally ran ashore as the water levels dropped. The mud dried, and the landscape became a desert, with the boats as relics of what once was. People who used to farm and fish in the region have had to look for other means of income, and many have struggled to do so.

Category IconHistory
3pts

Daily trivia question

Today’s Trivia Question

Where was the first lighthouse in the U.S. located?

PLAY!Plane icon

Poyang Lake — China

Poyang Lake — China

Credit: chuyuss/ Shutterstock

Poyang Lake was once China’s largest freshwater lake. The size has always been hard to define due to the fluctuations throughout the seasons. Now, however, Poyang Lake is nearly gone due to drought and the diversion of the Yangtze River. Unlike some of the other disappearing lakes, the former lake is now an eerie grassland instead of a desert. However, if the drought continues, the land could quickly turn to sand and dirt like we’ve seen in the Aral Sea.

Some aerial photos reveal bizarre paths in the grass from people cutting through the lake bed. The disappearance of the lake certainly affects the logistics of the surrounding cities and towns. For example, the city of Nanchang used to sit right on the water’s edge. Now the shoreline is over 15 miles away. And all this change has happened in just the last century. Animal activists are especially concerned about the impending extinction of a finless porpoise that mainly lives in Poyang Lake.

Lake Chad — Chad, Niger, Nigeria, and Cameroon

Lake Chad — Chad, Niger, Nigeria, and Cameroon

Credit: HomoCosmicos/ iStock

Lake Chad in Africa is another story of a once-enormous lake shrinking because of irrigation, climate change, and a steadily-growing population. This African lake has shrunk by 90% since the 1960s and is the water source for 20 to 30 million people. Is there any hope for restoring its waters?

Some propose routing water from the Congo River. The main problem with that is that the river is over 2,400 kilometers away (1,500 miles), and the governments of the four countries who share the lake (Chad, Niger, Nigeria, and Cameroon) are having a hard time coming to a consensus. Proponents of the plan suggest that if they can refill the lake, it would ease the crisis of nearly 11 million people in the region who need humanitarian aid to survive.

6 Countries That Have Banned McDonald’s

(THIS  ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

6 Countries That Have Banned McDonald’s

As one of the biggest restaurant chains in the world, with over 37,000 locations worldwide, McDonald’s is pretty easy to find just about anywhere on the globe. However, it is absent in several countries, and that absence hasn’t always been a choice left up to McDonald’s. Here are six countries that have banned the fast-food mega chain.

Bermuda

Credit: wwing / iStock

This island paradise has had a ban on foreign fast-food restaurants since the 1970s. Despite this ban, however, there was a McDonald’s built in Bermuda in 1985 – on the U.S. Naval Air Station located on the island. When the base closed in 1995, the McDonald’s left with it.

Despite this setback, McDonald’s made another attempt to plant the golden arches in Bermuda in 1999. This time, however, the fast food ban was upheld, and the McDonald’s was never built.

Iran

Credit: silverjohn / iStock

Iran was home to a McDonald’s at one point, but the country began to distance itself from Western culture following the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Tense relations in the decades since make the prospect for a new location unlikely.

Should McDonald’s ever regain a foothold in Iran, however, they may find fierce competition. In their absence, an imitator chain known as Mash Donald’s has been selling burgers for years.

Bolivia

Credit: benedek / iStock

Bolivia is the only country in Latin America besides Cuba without a McDonald’s. While there is no outright ban on McDonald’s in Bolivia, the Bolivian people and government have not welcomed the burger franchise. In fact, there was a location in La Paz until 2002, but poor sales and pushback from locals, who expressed a desire to buy their burgers from locations not owned by an international business, forced the franchise to close.

After the location had closed, the former president of Bolivia stated that corporations like McDonald’s are “not interested in the health of human beings, only in earnings and corporate profits.”

North Korea

Credit: Omer Serkan Bakir / iStock

One of the least surprising countries to appear on this list, North Korea’s aversion to foreign interests has kept the country culturally insulated since the end of the Korean War.

While North Korea may have zero McDonald’s franchises, South Korea has over 850. This led to a famous incident in 2011 when North Korean elites used the national airline to smuggle McDonald’s burgers across the border.

Iceland

Credit: patpongs / iStock

There were three McDonald’s locations in Iceland’s capital of Reykjavik until 2009. Unfortunately, the currency of Iceland, the krona, collapsed when the economy faltered, and all three closed their doors in rapid succession.

Iceland is one of the healthiest countries in the world, and the government has been wary of the consequences of allowing the fast food giant to re-establish itself. An Icelandic fast food chain has popped up in McDonald’s absence, serving locally-sourced meat and produce.

Montenegro

Credit: GoodLifeStudio / iStock

Government concerns about the impact of a McDonald’s franchise on the health of the population caused the closure of a small McDonald’s in the capital city of Podgorica. The local media supported the departure of the country’s only McDonald’s location, favoring the opportunity for local restaurants to serve the community.

However, the public relations department of the government of Montenegro refuted that claim. Stating that “no company, not even McDonald’s, is ‘forbidden’ to do business in Montenegro.” Despite that lukewarm welcome, however, there are still no McDonald’s location in Montenegro.

These are not the only countries without a single McDonald’s, however. There are dozens of countries without McDonald’s, primarily because the corporation has deemed the local economy or political environment too unstable to support a successful franchise. In fact, many economists consider the arrival of a McDonald’s franchise in a developing world an indicator of economic stability.

Landscapes Around the World You Won’t Believe Exist

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

Landscapes Around the World You Won’t Believe Exist

Earth is home to some spectacular natural vistas – dense forest, raging rivers and rugged mountains are sights we are all familiar with. But there are a few places that you may be surprised that you can even visit on this planet. Here are some landscapes from around the world that you won’t believe exist.

DAILY QUESTION

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia

Credit: Delpixart / iStock

This expansive salt flat covers over 4,000 square miles high in the Bolivian Andes. Formed by the slow growth, reduction, and disappearance of many different lakes over the last 50,000 years, Salar de Uyuni is like no place on Earth. While the unending plain of snow-white salt is something to see on its own, the real show begins after a rain has passed over and transforms Salar de Uyuni into the world’s largest mirror.

Lake Baikal, Russia

Credit: fyw PHOTOGRAPHY / iStock

The largest freshwater lake in the world, Lake Baikal holds more water than all the Great Lakes combined. But it becomes much more than just a massive lake during the winter, when the lake freezes over for five months. The frozen water is so clear that you can see almost 150 feet below the surface. In March, as temperatures begin to rise, the icy crust begins to crack, and ice shards are pushed above the surface. Sunlight streams though the blocks of ice and shines in an unearthly shade of turquoise.

Waitamo Glowworm Caves, New Zealand

Credit: MarcelStrelow / iStock

There are over 300 limestone caves in the Waitamo region of New Zealand. One has been capturing the imagination of visitors for generations – the Waitamo Glowworm caves. The roof of this cave is home to a massive population of Arancamoa Luminosa, glow worms that bathe the cave in pale greenish blue light as visitors glide across the shallow waters of the cave.

Mount Roraima, Venezuela

Credit: MaRabelo / iStock

This flat-top mountain sits at the intersection of Venezuela, Brazil, and Guyana. It has inspired both the native South Americans and visitors to the region for centuries. Somewhat more recently, the unique landscape served as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s inspiration for his novel, The Lost World.

In the novel, Sir Doyle imagines a world apart from the rest of the planet, cut off and inaccessible, still inhabited by dinosaurs and other creatures from bygone eras. If you have a chance to see Mount Roraima’s flat, 12-square mile summit towering above the clouds, surrounded by cliffs over 1,000 feet high, you’ll understand how Sir Doyle envisioned a world where life could continue undisturbed.

Zhangjiajie, China

Credit: aphotostory / iStock

Deep within the Wulingyuan scenic area of China’s Hunan province lies the Zhangjiajie National Forest Park. Abundant greenery hides the true star of the park – freestanding pillar formations that were carved out over centuries of physical erosion. These pillars also served as the inspiration for a famous science-fiction setting: the alien jungle of James Cameron’s film Avatar. It was modeled after the Zhangjiajie forest.

Zhangye Danxia, China

Credit: Photons_in_action / iStock

The Zhangye National Geopark consists of natural rock formations with fabulous bands of color streaked through them. The formations are the result of more than 20 million years of sandstone and other minerals depositing in the area. The deposits were then twisted to their current angle by steady tectonic movements, which give them the striking appearance they have today.

Valley of the Ten Peaks, Canada

Credit: Wildroze / iStock

High in Canada’s Banff National Park lies Moraine Lake, an Alpine destination where crystal-clear waters are bordered by a tall evergreen forest, which is in turn dwarfed by ten imposing peaks, all of which are over 10,000 feet. The lake can be easily reached by road, which means you can visit one of the most awe-inspiring destinations in North American with little more than a long drive.

Holidays you won’t believe actually exist

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

Holidays you won’t believe actually exist

There isn’t much that beats a long weekend during a public holiday, one that you can celebrate with your family and friends. Typically, these days mark a significant historical date or commemorate a watershed moment in a society’s past—and sometimes they don’t. Here are some publicly recognized holidays that you won’t believe actually exist.

Fifth of July

Credit: gilaxia / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: United States

Independence Day is one of the most important holidays celebrated in America. It celebrates the virtue that is the core of the American ideology – freedom. The holiday marks the signing of the Declaration of Independence, a document that represents a turning point in United States and world history. It is also a celebration of summer, epitomized by backyard barbecues, company picnics and elaborate fireworks displays.

However, since the Fourth of July is federal holiday on a hard date, it sometimes falls on a weekend. If this is the case, federal employees, schools, and the post office take the following Monday off, and many businesses follow suit. This makes the Fifth of July the holiday. July 5 is also National Bikini Day in the United States, which makes a perfect day to head to the beach.

National Picnic Day

Credit: JaySi / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Australia

The first Monday of August is Picnic Day in the Northern Territory of Australia. Schools are closed, the postal service is suspended, and businesses are expected to give employees the day off.

While it may seem strange to suspend all business activities for something as simple as a picnic, the tradition comes from Australia’s industrial heritage. Picnic Day was originally a company wide event for railroad employees, which soon expanded into a region-wide series of events culminated in the Harts Range Races in Central Australia. However, some groups in Australia celebrate the day to mark a different occasion. It is sometimes used to remember the day when Chinese indentured servants were released from their tasks related to building the North Australia Railway.

Up Helly Aa

Credit: HelenL100 / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Scotland

Up Helly Aa is a celebration of many things: winter, fire, Vikings, and, perhaps most significantly, alcohol. The celebration is held on the last Tuesday in January in multiple locations across the Shetland Islands and typically consists of costumed revelers parading through the streets of the largest nearby town. The festival begins with participants drinking heavily and ends with the burning of a replica Viking ship.

While the tradition might seem steeped in history, it is not, as there is no record of Norse cultures holding a similar event at that time of year. By most accounts, the celebration began as a way to combat public drunkenness and disorder in the early 1800s. Despite all these odd facts, Up Helly Aa is a publicly-recognized holiday, and all government operated offices are closed.

Day of the Sea

Credit: StreetFlash / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Bolivia

A holiday honoring a country’s maritime history wouldn’t be anything out of the ordinary – unless that country was landlocked, as Bolivia is. The Day of the Sea, held every March 23, is the day that Bolivia remembers the loss of their last stretch of oceanfront property, the Port of Caluma. To commemorate the event, participants hold a parade that is accompanied by recordings of ship horns and sea gulls.

Bermuda Day

Credit: wwing / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Bermuda

At first glance, Bermuda Day seems normal enough. What country doesn’t take time to celebrate their heritage and way of life? What makes Bermuda Day intriguing, however, is the specific details of island life highlighted during the event. Bermuda day, celebrated every May 24, is widely known as the first day it is socially acceptable to swim in the ocean and wear shorts to work. In that way, it is a little like casual Friday, except it lasts all summer.

Holidays You may not believe actually exist

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

Holidays you won’t believe actually exist

There isn’t much that beats a long weekend during a public holiday, one that you can celebrate with your family and friends. Typically, these days mark a significant historical date or commemorate a watershed moment in a society’s past—and sometimes they don’t. Here are some publicly recognized holidays that you won’t believe actually exist.

Fifth of July

Credit: gilaxia / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: United States

Independence Day is one of the most important holidays celebrated in America. It celebrates the virtue that is the core of the American ideology – freedom. The holiday marks the signing of the Declaration of Independence, a document that represents a turning point in United States and world history. It is also a celebration of summer, epitomized by backyard barbecues, company picnics and elaborate fireworks displays.

However, since the Fourth of July is federal holiday on a hard date, it sometimes falls on a weekend. If this is the case, federal employees, schools, and the post office take the following Monday off, and many businesses follow suit. This makes the Fifth of July the holiday. July 5 is also National Bikini Day in the United States, which makes a perfect day to head to the beach.

National Picnic Day

Credit: JaySi / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Australia

The first Monday of August is Picnic Day in the Northern Territory of Australia. Schools are closed, the postal service is suspended, and businesses are expected to give employees the day off.

While it may seem strange to suspend all business activities for something as simple as a picnic, the tradition comes from Australia’s industrial heritage. Picnic Day was originally a company wide event for railroad employees, which soon expanded into a region-wide series of events culminated in the Harts Range Races in Central Australia. However, some groups in Australia celebrate the day to mark a different occasion. It is sometimes used to remember the day when Chinese indentured servants were released from their tasks related to building the North Australia Railway.

Up Helly Aa

Credit: HelenL100 / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Scotland

Up Helly Aa is a celebration of many things: winter, fire, Vikings, and, perhaps most significantly, alcohol. The celebration is held on the last Tuesday in January in multiple locations across the Shetland Islands and typically consists of costumed revelers parading through the streets of the largest nearby town. The festival begins with participants drinking heavily and ends with the burning of a replica Viking ship.

While the tradition might seem steeped in history, it is not, as there is no record of Norse cultures holding a similar event at that time of year. By most accounts, the celebration began as a way to combat public drunkenness and disorder in the early 1800s. Despite all these odd facts, Up Helly Aa is a publicly-recognized holiday, and all government operated offices are closed.

Day of the Sea

Credit: StreetFlash / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Bolivia

A holiday honoring a country’s maritime history wouldn’t be anything out of the ordinary – unless that country was landlocked, as Bolivia is. The Day of the Sea, held every March 23, is the day that Bolivia remembers the loss of their last stretch of oceanfront property, the Port of Caluma. To commemorate the event, participants hold a parade that is accompanied by recordings of ship horns and sea gulls.

Bermuda Day

Credit: wwing / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Bermuda

At first glance, Bermuda Day seems normal enough. What country doesn’t take time to celebrate their heritage and way of life? What makes Bermuda Day intriguing, however, is the specific details of island life highlighted during the event. Bermuda day, celebrated every May 24, is widely known as the first day it is socially acceptable to swim in the ocean and wear shorts to work. In that way, it is a little like casual Friday, except it lasts all summer.

Brazil Chapecoense football team in Colombia plane crash

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE BBC NEWS AGENCY)

Brazil Chapecoense football team in Colombia plane crash

Remains of aircraftImage copyright TELEANTIOQUIA VIA TWITTER
Image caption The plane crashed in a mountainous area on its way to Medellin

A plane carrying 81 people, including a top Brazilian football team, has crashed on its approach to the city of Medellin in Colombia, officials say.

Reports say there are 25 dead and six survivors.

The chartered aircraft, flying from Bolivia, was carrying members of the Chapecoense football team, airport officials said.

The team was due to play in the final of the Copa Sudamericana, against Medellin team Atletico Nacional.

The first leg of the final of the cup, South America’s second most important club competition, was scheduled for Wednesday, but has now been suspended.

The South American Football Confederation (Conmebol) said it was suspending “all activities”.

Chapecoense team at semi-final against Argentina's San Lorenzo - 24 NovemberImage copyrightAFP
Image captionThe team were due to play in the first leg of the final of the Copa Sudamericana
Scene of the crashImage copyright MI ORIENTE
Image caption Rescuers can only reach the crash site by land – local media picture

Chapecoense issued a brief statement saying: “May God be with our athletes, officials, journalists and other guests travelling with our delegation.”

It said it would refrain from any further statements until it had assessed the extent of the crash.

Reports suggest that at least two members of the team – Alan Ruschel and Danilo – may have survived.

The sports network Telemundo Deportes tweeted (in Spanish) that Ruschel was in shock but conscious and talking, and asked to keep his wedding ring and to see his family.

The mayor of the nearby town of La Ceja confirmed that a 25-year-old footballer was among the survivors.

He said that 25 people were known to have died.

The team, from the southern city of Chapeco, was promoted to Brazil’s first division in 2014 and reached the final last week after a victory against Argentina’s San Lorenzo.

Reports say the British Aerospace 146 short-haul plane, operated by Bolivian charter airline Lamia and carrying 72 passengers and nine crew, crashed in Cerro Gordo in the municipality of La Union shortly before midnight local time (05:00 GMT).

According to an airport press release, it was reporting an electrical fault to the control tower.

Map locator

Medellin’s Mayor Federico Gutierrez described it as “a tragedy of huge proportions”.

The Jose Maria Cordova de Rionegro airport, which serves Medellin, posted on its Twitter account: “Confirmed, the aircraft licence number CP2933 was carrying the team @ChapecoenseReal. Apparently there are survivors.”

It later said in a statement that “all possible aid was being mobilised because six survivors are being reported”.

Poor weather has meant that the crash site, in a mountainous area, is only accessible by land.

However, there was no fire on impact, which has given rescuers hope that more survivors may be found.

Conmebol said in a statement that its president, Alejandro Dominguez, was on his way to Medellin.

“The Conmebol family greatly regrets what happened. All activities of the confederation are suspended until further notice,” it said.


Chapecoense football team

  • Founded in 1973.
  • Promoted to the Brazilian top division, Serie A, for the first time in the club’s history in 2014. Currently ninth.
  • Were flying to play in the first leg of the final of the Copa Sudamericana – winner qualifies for Copa Libertadores, top continental competition in South America.
  • Were underdogs – facing current Cope Libertadores holders Atletico Nacional
  • Based in the Brazilian city of Chapeco in the state of Santa Catarina.
  • Brazil’s 21st biggest club in terms of revenue at 46m reais ($13.5m/£10.9m)
Diary of a Gay Dad. I am a full time dad to five young children.

People family relationships children cooking jam making and being a gay dad

المعلومات في جميع المجلات

هذا الموقع يمكنه الكلام في ما يدور في العالم

The Common Sense Theologian

Theology, Politics, Life, Education, Family, Home, Kids, Marriage, Outdoors

India Travel BLog

A Blog about Indian Tourism

Danny's wor(l)d

have a great read here!!

%d bloggers like this: