(Religious Flavored Poem) Now In It’s Time

Now In It’s Time

 

The Spirit of God speaks to the Soul

It is time to go for the Seed is in the womb

The Soul to the Seed now the heart beats

The Seed does swell and fills the womb

Now it is time to breathe and feel the Sun

 

The Soul is given within the Momma’s womb

The Soul is now designated a woman or man

First we crawl then we walk or run the trail of life

Now the Mind learns what the Soul already knows

Now it is time, responsibility is now our own

 

We grow, we learn, we live,  but in our own way

We see evil, we see good, now we do choose

Freedom of choice, this we all have within

Do we choose love, kindness, mercy, or no

How did we choose for now in it time we die

 

 

 

The Sixty Days Of Purim

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CHABAD.ORG)

 

This article will be something of a mixed-media piece. It’ll start with a “Purim Torah,” move on to more serious “Kabbalah” stuff, and conclude with an inspiring Chassidic teaching.

(A “Purim Torah” is what Torah scholars do for fun on Purim: a short exposition that sounds and feels like a typical piece of Talmud, yet is either patently absurd or just skewered enough to be taken seriously on Purim.)

First, the Purim Torah:

Question: We read in the Book of Esther how Hamandesired “to destroy, kill and annihilate all the Jews, from young to old, infants and woman, in a single day — on the 13th of the twelfth month, that is, the month of Adar” (Esther 3:13). But why was it so important to Haman that his evil decree be carried out “in a single day”? Would such a thing even have been logistically possible? Indeed, Haman initially cast lots to determine which month should be chosen as the time for the genocide of the Jews.1 Our sages tell us that when the lot fell on the month of Adar, Haman rejoiced: this was the month in which Moses had died (on Adar 7), surely a month that bodes ill for the Jews.2 Having hit on an apparently auspicious month for his plans, why did Haman continue with his lot-throwing to pinpoint a particular day?

Answer: Haman was a keen student of Jewish history. He knew that the Jewish calendar is dotted with festivals celebrating the Jewish people’s salvation from an enemy who sought to destroy them. What if — Haman worried — their G‑d saves them again? If I designate the month of Adar for their destruction, they’ll celebrate all month long!

Finale: In this, too, Haman’s plan was foiled. When Mordechai and Esther institutionalized the celebration of the Purim miracle, they ordained not only the Purim observances of Adar 14 and 15, but also the commemoration of “the month that was transformed for them from sorrow to joy, from mourning to festivity” (Esther 9:22). Hence the Talmudic ruling, “when the month of Adar enters, increase in joy” (Talmud, Taanit 26b).

Now for the Kabbalah:

There are two ways in which the Jewish Calendar, and the nature of Jewish time, can be understood:

a) The “Special Days” Approach: The annual cycle consists of hundreds of days, most of which are of the ordinary, run-of-the-mill variety. Thankfully, these are punctuated by a number of special days — festivals and holy days imbued with special spiritual qualities. We trudge through the ordinary days, inspired and encouraged by the fact that we’re never more than a few weeks away from a Passover or Purim, or — at the very least — a Lag BaOmer or a “New Year for Trees.”

b) The “Quality of the Month” Approach: Jewish time is comprised not of days but of months, each possessing a distinct spiritual essence. The “special” days of the year are simply days on which the particular month’s quality is more pronounced and actualized. Thus, Nissan is the “Month of Liberation,” while Passover (observed on Nissan 15 to 22) is a week-long period in Nissan during which the month’s freedom-quality is more accessible. Similarly, Sivan is the month of Wisdom, Shevat is the month of Growth and Fruitfulness, Elul is the month of Compassion, and so on. Each month has days in which the month’s quality rises to the surface and manifests itself more than on the month’s “ordinary” days; but these are differences of expression rather than of essence — essentially, each day of the month equally possesses the month’s unique spiritual properties. This is why many of the festivals and special dates of the Jewish calendar occur on the 15th of the month — the night of the full moon, representing the point at which the month’s essence is in its most revealed and luminous state.3

Adar is the month of Transformation. Adar transforms sorrow into joy, doubt into supra-knowledge, oblivion into exuberant being. Adar transforms a “scattered people” into a unified nation, and a moment of national weakness (when the Jewish people participated in Achashverosh‘s feast in the belief that allegiance to a mortal king will ensure their survival) into the greatest statement of Jewish commitment of all time (when for an entire year every single Jew remained faithful to his/her people and G‑d, even as a decree of annihilation hung over the head of every Jew in the world). Adar transforms the most physical of activities — eating and drinking — into an affirmation of our bond with G‑d.

So while two days in Adar — the 14th and the 15th of the month — are observed as “Purim,” these represent the apex of an entire month of joyous transformation and transformative joy.

Finally, here’s the inspiring chassidic thought we promised:

A month on the Jewish calendar includes either 29 or 30 days (reflecting the 29.5-day lunar cycle). But every two or three years — seven times in a 19-year cycle, to be exact — Adar doubles in size: on these “pregnant years,” as they’re called, there’s a 30-day “Adar I” followed by a 29-day “Adar II.” In addition, 30th of Shevat is also the first of Adar I’s Rosh Chodesh (“head of the month”) days. This makes for a total of 60 “Adar days.”

The Lubavitcher Rebbe points out that the number “60” represents the power of transformation. A rule-of-thumb in Torah law is the “nullified by sixty” principle. For example, if a piece of non-kosher food accidentally falls into a pot of kosher food, the undesirable element is “nullified” if the desirable element is sixty times greater than it.

Thus, the Rebbe concludes, in a year blessed with a double, 60-day Adar, all undesirable elements — every and any cause for pain, sadness, discouragement or dejection — are nullified and sublimated by the transformative joy of Adar.

Who Was Nathan The Prophet?

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CHABAD.ORG)

 

Nathan (c. 880-790 BCE1 ) was a prominent prophet during the reign of King David and King Solomon. According to tradition, Nathan studied in an elite academy of mystics2 under the tutelage of the prophet Samuel.3 Although no book in the Biblical Canon is associated with his name, the Talmud tells us that Nathan concluded the writing of the book of Samuel.4

Nathan Rebukes David

Nathan first gains fame in the Biblical account, in the heat of the great debacle of David and Batsheba. King David had cohabited with Bathsheba after observing her beauty from the palace rooftop and was severely reprimanded by G‑d for doing so.5

Nathan delivered G‑d’s rebuke by opening the conversation with a parallel. “There were two men,” said Nathan, “one rich and one poor. The rich man had very many sheep and cattle, and the poor man had nothing but one small ewe which he had bought. He cared for it, and it grew up [under his care] along with his children. It ate from his bread, drank from his cup, and slept in his bosom. It was a daughter to him.”

Nathan continued. “Then a guest came to the rich man. The wealthy host was too miserly to take any of his own sheep or cattle to prepare for the guest who had come to him. [Instead,] he took the poor man’s ewe and prepared it for the guest who had come to him.”

King David was outraged by the arrogance and impudence of the rich man, and declared, “As G‑d lives, the man who did this deserves to die! He shall pay fourfold for the ewe, since he did this and had no pity!”

By issuing a verdict in the case set before him, David had unwittingly set the rules for his own prosecution and conviction.6

Nathan responded and said, “You are the man! . . . Why have you treated G‑d’s word with contempt, doing evil in My sight? You cut down Uriah (Bathsheba’s husband) with a sword and took his wife as your wife! . . . I will raise evil against you from your own house . . . I will do this in the sight of Israel, in the open!”

When David recognized the scope of his sin, admitted his guilt and repented for his actions, Nathan conveyed G‑d’s message that He had accepted his atonement.7

Nathan was thus instrumental in restoring King David’s dignity (allowing him to “raise his head”) in the aftermath of this sin. Having been informed of G‑d’s forgiveness by Nathan, David remarked, “Instead of my beheading, you have raised my head.”8

Prophecy Regarding Building the Temple

When quiet finally reigned in the land of Israel, after King David subdued the enemies of Jews through many bloody battles, he sought the counsel of Nathan with respect to building a sanctuary for G‑d, a Holy Temple. Despite his initial nod, Nathan was informed by prophecy that King David was ineligible to erect the House of G‑d, which was to be a house of peace. King David, he was told,9 whose sword smote the enemies of the Jewish people, would be unsuitable to construct the Temple.10 Instead, his son, King Solomon will build the Temple.11

Through his prophetic vision, Nathan helped design the configuration of the Temple’s floorplan as well as develop the appropriate activities performed therein. The verse states:

“[King Hizkiyah] also stationed the Levites in G‑d’s Temple with cymbals, and harps and Iyres, as commanded by David, Gad the king’s seer, and Nathan the prophet, for this was the commandment of G‑d through his prophets.”12

The Appointment of King Solomon

As the reign of King David was winding down and David took ill, the race was on for a successor to the throne. David’s son, Adoniyahu put forward his candidacy and as the prospect of his nomination appeared to gain traction, a growing number of royal dignitaries declared him king.13

But David had already sworn to Bathsheba that her son Solomon would inherit the throne.14

Nathan proceeded to inform Bathsheba of the development and together they coordinated their appearance before the king.15 When David heard the news he swore, saying: “By the Living G‑d . . . I swore to you by G‑d, L‑rd of Israel: ‘Your son Solomon will reign after me and he will sit on my throne after me,’ and I will fulfill [my vow] today!”16

David then proceeded to have Solomon coronated in public view, by the agency of Nathan, Zadok the high priest, Benayahu ben Yehoyada and many other dignitaries.17

Nathan remained one of the closest confidants of King Solomon. The Midrash teaches that two honorary seats flanked the throne of King Solomon, one for Gad the Seer and the other for Nathan the prophet.18

FOOTNOTES
1.

See Shalshelet Ha-Kabalah p. 98b, cited in Seder Ha-Dorot, s.v. 2935 that Nathan’s lifespan was 94 years.

2.

See I Samuel 10:5. Radak, ibid.

3.

See R. Yehuda Ha-Levi Lifshitz, Dor Yesharim (Piotrkow, 1908) vol. II, p. 10.

4.

Bava Batra 15a.

6.

R. Israel Ba’al Shem Tov, cited in Likutei Maharankama, 113. See also the Lubavitcher Rebbe’s exposition of this teaching in Likutei Sichot, vol. IV, p. 1208 where this is understood as a testimony to the transcendence of the divine soul vested within a Jewish person, insofar as no force of nature or spirit can assert control over his destiny, unless he himself has granted that force the authority to do so, abdicating his state of transcendence above the natural order.

7.

II Shmuel, 12:13-14.

8.

Pesikta d’Rav Kahana II, Parshat Ki Sisa, 1. Midrash Tanchuma, ibid, 3.

9.

I Chronicles 22:7-8. Radak, ibid.

10.

Much like the prohibition against using metal instruments to carve the stones of the altar in the Temple (Metzudat David, I Chronicles 22:8).

Radak (ibid) adds that David also orchestrated the death of Uriah, husband of Bathsheba (See II Samuel 11:15-17). In addition, the tragic slaughtering of 85 kohanim(priests) of the city of Nob (I Samuel 22:22) by the instruction of King Saul, was an inadvertent result of David’s actions. In lamentation, David stated, “I knew that day, when Doeg the Edomite was there, that he surely told Saul. I have caused the death of your clan.”

With respect to casualties of war, the Midrash (Bereishit Rabbah 63:8) states that David’s actions were sanctioned by the Sanhedrin. See also, Kli Yakar (R. Shmuel Laniado, II Shmuel 2:7 p. 133). Yachin Uvoaz-Zera Rav, p. 126. Ezrat Kohanim, p. 48.

11.

I Chronicles ibid. 9.

13.

See I Melachim, 1:5-7. Ibid, 25.

14.

Ibid., 17 and Abarbanel. See Radak, II Shmuel, 12:24who explains that Bathsheba initially refused to bear another child with king David, fearing that he would be taunted for his being of tainted lineage. David assured her that he had been informed by the prophet of G‑d that the first son that would be born to her would inherit the throne.

A commentary attributed to Rabbi Yehuda Ha-Chassid (Pirushei Ha-Torah l’Rebi Yehudah Ha-Chassidhaftorahof parashat Chayei Sarah, cited in Chumash Otzar Ha-Rishonim) presents an alternative narrative. After Solomon was born, Nathan had informed David that Solomon would reign, which prompted David to seek qualified teachers to prepare Solomon for the position. When his mother, Bathsheba, protested saying that she feared that he would be slain by his older brothers such as Abashalom, Adoniyahu and Amnon, David swore that he would ensure his ascent to the throne. He then enlisted Nathan, Tzadok (the high priest), Benayahu ben Yehoyada (the chief commander of the military) to train Solomon in various fields, and an entire corps of guardians to provide physical protection for Solomon.

I am grateful to Rabbi Joseph Asia (publisher of Chumash Otzar Ha-Rishonim) for sharing the original source with me.

18.

Midrash Abba Gurion, 1.

(Poem) So You Saw The Face Of God You Say

So You Saw The Face Of God You Say

 

Though you were but a young child

People still believed what you did say

You swear you saw the Trinity of God

The Holy Spirit, The Father and The Son

From the sky with Golden gifts to you

 

People beaten down will grasp at anything

You say you lost the gift only your family seen

What you say the Scriptures don’t say the same

Are you as ignorant of the Scriptures as you seem

You had to put the Bible away to say your play

 

You say your greater than Moses, the friend of God

Your a Prophet of what as you stash the Bible away

Only the ignorant or a fraud would say the things you say

You and your family wrote your own Evil into play

No human has ever seen the face of The Father

But when you do you’ll pay, for you Hell’s Fire awaits

(Philosophy Poem) The Lord’s Path To Walk

The Lord’s Path To Walk

 

If you walk with The Lord fear not the path you tread

Like the Perfect Doctor He always protects and saves

The wise do not have the wisdom of their own Creator

A sensible person clings to His laws as Divine Oracles

Guard yourself with His Light upon your feet and heart

 

Know what you will say before your words are formed

There is a time that all should stay quiet and to listen

Draw upon your G-d given wisdom when your speaking

The heart of the fool walks within the prints of a Dragon

If our friend mocks the path you walk he is indeed no friend

 

In the days of our life do we make one more important than others

Do we not all along with the Earth rotate around the same Sun

In The Lord’s wisdom each day and each season is appointed to us

We were all made of dust and to it we shall all surely return again

Follow The Lord’s path and His words for they are exalted and blessed

 

Do not give power over your Soul to anyone else for our Creator owns us

All of the Lords works is in pairs of two like a coin with two sides two faces

The wise listen and obey their Master’s voice but the fool walks in darkness

Excel in your daily walk with The Lord, put no undue strain upon your honor

We shall all receive our due inheritance from the life that we choose to walk

 

 

(Theology Based Poem) THE GREAT LIGHT

THE GREAT LIGHT

(The idea for this poem came from reading Matthew 5: 15-16)

 

The darkness of the world surrounds us
The Great Light we know of but cannot see
Life ends in either the dirt or Hells Fire
Wrong Blood, wrong body in the wrong time 
Unclean, unwanted, Dark Angels all around

 

We see the Temple where we cannot tread
From the crumbs of the Table we beg to be fed
The Light that shines covers the living and the dead
We hear the voice from the Wilderness its calling
From the Tree to the Grave the Great Light is shining

 

We now have The Light, a true chance to live again
Many turn their back to The Light preferring the grave
The Light so bright is upon every single living Soul
The Son is The Great Light we now can forever behold
Refuse The Light to the grave then to Hell’s Fire we’ll go

Who Was The Prophet Malachi

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CHABAD.ORG)

 

Malachi (d. 312 BCE) was a member of the Great Assembly during the beginning of the second Jewish commonwealth and was considered the last Jewish prophet.

Who Was Malachi?

Some opinions in the Talmud maintain that Malachi was Mordechai,1 the hero of the Purimstory, but referred to as Malachi because of his position as viceroy of Persia—a designation similar to that of an angel (“malach”) who is subordinate to G‑d.2 Another view, supported by many authorities,3 is that Malachi is a pseudonym for Ezra the Scribe,4 while a third perspective identifies Malachi as neither Mordechai nor Ezra, but a third prophet entirely.

Some contemporary authors suggest that the name Malachi is a reference to the final prophecy of his book which opens with the words, Hineni sholeach malachi (“Behold I send My messenger”).5

The Book of Malachi

The Book of Malachi comprises three chapters of prophecies exhorting the Jewish people to better their ways and portending future upheavals should they fail to do so. It is the last of the series of 12 prophets known collectively as Trei Asar (“twelve”) or Minor Prophets.

Some suggest that the prophecies ascribed to ChaggaiZechariah, and Malachi were actually transmitted to the prophets of preceding generations but publicized by Chaggai, Zechariah, and Malachi who had received them by tradition.6 In the interim, Jeremiahprophesied and was the last to do so.7 Nevertheless, the Talmud still ascribes the conclusion of the prophetic period to Malachi because his prophecies were published at a later date.8

An alternate perspective is that prophecy continued, albeit in minute measure, during the lifetime of Chaggai, Zechariah, and Malachi. Indeed, the Talmud teaches that these prophets prophesied during the second year of King Darius’ reign9 regarding the rebuilding of the Temple.10

The Withdrawal of Prophecy

The life of the prophet Malachi is an important turning point in Jewish history, as it marks the close of the glorious era of Jewish prophecy.11 The Talmud teaches, “After the last prophets Chaggai, Zechariah, and Malachi died, the Divine Spirit of prophetic revelation departed from the Jewish people.”12

Nevertheless, the works of the Talmudic era testify to the continued presence of Divine inspiration amongst the Jewish people well after Malachi’s demise. Moreover, many medieval Jewish works point to the possibility of achieving Divine inspiration should one be worthy of it.13 Although varying in degree and intensity from that of the prophets, Divine inspiration is a subcategory of prophecy,14and the Talmud’s statement limiting prophecy to the pre-Malachi era therefore implies only a general decline in the spiritual efficacy of subsequent generations without precluding the possibility of exceptional individuals attaining prophecy.15

Read: Why Are There No More Prophets?

Love by Choice

Although small in size, the prophecies of Malachi are noted with great interest in Jewish thought, beginning with the very first line—a sententious statement that is most telling of G‑d’s unique relationship with the Jewish people:

I have shown you [Israel] love, said the L‑rd. But you ask, “How have You shown us love?” After all—declares the L‑rd—Esau is Jacob’s brother; yet I have accepted Jacob and have rejected Esau.

This declaration conveys a fundamental principle of Jewish thought: While from a human vantage point it may appear that Esau and Jacob are brothers—equals—and that Jewish identity and Jewish destiny are not guided by Divine preference, Malachi informs us that the Jewish people were singled out by G‑d to be His people. Rabbi Yosef Albo explains that the love described by G‑d in these verses is supra-rational; it cannot be justified by logic alone. It is a love of choice.16

The Chassidic masters further develop this teaching, considering the unique qualities of Divine choice. Unlike human choice, which is an exercise in decision-making based on specific advantages and characteristics of an object or experience, G‑d’s choices are made within His essence which is not contingent upon anything else.17 As such, His love of the Jewish people is unconditional and eternal; as G‑d is eternal so is His chosen people.

Read: Who Is a Jew? Solving the Mystery of Jewish Identity

No Changes

Another of Malachi’s noteworthy prophecies speaks to the heart of Jewish theology:

For I am the L‑rd—I have not changed; and you are the children of Jacob—you have not ceased to be.18

The prelude to the daily prayers includes the following declaration of Malachi’s:

You were the same before the world was created; You are the same since the world has been created.19

G‑d’s enduring and unchanging existence is the fundamental principle of faith upon which the entire edifice of Judaism stands. More specifically, it involves the recognition that the act of creation does not redefine G‑d in any way.

Maimonides writes:

He who is everlasting, constant, and in no way subject to change; immutable in His Essence, and as He consists of naught but His Essence, He is mutable in no way whatever; not mutable in His relation to other things: for there is no relation whatever existing between Him and any other being . . and therefore no change as regard; such relations can take place in Him. Hence He is immutable in every respect, as He expressly declares,” I, the L‑rd, do not change”20: i.e., in Me there is not any change whatever.21

Chassidic teachings expound upon this and explain that since the world is truly nullified in its entirety in relation to G‑d, and is wholly united with Him, He remains one after the world was created as He was prior to its creation.22

Malachi also implies that G‑d’s immutability is what drives the eternal nature of the Jewish people (“And you are the children of Jacob—you have not ceased to be”). Even if worldly affairs seem to indicate that G‑d has abandoned His people, we are reminded by Malachi that G‑d does not change and His love for His people always remains intact. And just as it is impossible for Him to cease to exist, so will the Jewish people eternally endure.23

The eternality of the Jewish people leads us directly to the final lines of Malachi’s prophecy, which tell of the Messianic redemption:

Lo, I will send you Elijah the prophet before the coming of the great and awesome day of the Lord, that he may turn the heart of the fathers back through the children, and the heart of the children back through their fathers…24

FOOTNOTES
1.

Megillah 15a.

2.

Maharsha, ibid.

3.

See Targum Yonatan, Malachi 1:1; Rabbeinu Chananel, Megillah ibid. Rashi, Malachi 2:11. Tosafot, Ketubot 16a, Bosar d’Kansinu; Yevamot 86b., Mipnei Mah. Kuzari, 3:65. Meiri, Avot 1:1. Cf. Radak, Malachi, ibid.

4.

Megillah 15a.

5.

See Otzar Yisrael (Eisenstein), Malachi (vol. VI p. 209). Encyclopedia l’Toarei kavod b’Yisrael, p. 1550.

6.

This is in line with the teaching of the Midrash that all prophecies were initially transmitted at Sinai and were later revealed by the prophets when the time was ripe (See Rashi, Malachi 1:1).

7.

Midrash Aggadah, Bamidbar 30:15. Pesikta d’Rav Kahana, p. 116a.

8.

See Midrash Aggadah ibid. stating, “The prophecies were deposited with them [for safekeeping].”

9.

Megillah 15a.

10.

See Chaggai 1:1. Radak, ibid.

11.

Bava Batra 14b.

12.

Yoma 9b. Sotah 48b. Tosefta ibid, 13:4; Sanhedrin 11:1.

13.

See Pirkei Giluyim, introduction to She’elot uteshuvot Min Ha-Shamayim (Margolis), pp. 25-41.

14.

Likutei Sichot, vol. XIV, p. 73, note 20.

15.

See Likutei Sichot ibid. where the language of the Talmud is demonstrated to be most precise in that the word chosen for the removal of prophecy is nistalkah, meaning withdrawn, as opposed to batlah (“annulled”), or paskah(“curtailed”). Cf. Griz Ha-Levy, Malachi ibid.

16.

Sefer Ha-Ikarim 3:37.

17.

See Torah Ohr p. 120c, Likutei Torah (Gimel Parshiyos) 37a, Ohr Ha-Torah Bereishit vol. III, pp. 565a, and Likutei Sichot vol. IV p. 1341, vol. VII p. 25, vol. XXXVI p. 50.

19.

See Yalkut Shimoni, Va-Etchanan sec. 836.

21.

Guide to the Perplexed I:XI.

22.

See Sha’ar Ha-Yichud Ve-Ha-Emunah ch. VII.

23.

Rambam, Igeret Teiman, sec. U’kvar hivti’ach.

(Philosophy Poem) Living By Faith And G-d’s Grace

(Living By Faith An G-d’s Grace)

 

On a night so very long ago now it seems

Was the first night that a man saw the Stars

On a Sabbath a man from the dirt was made

A rib plucked from his side a helpmate

Designed to grow old in Paradise, not die

 

Seven generations a Holy Man was born

His first Son Abraham gave of his spoils

Methuselah a true High Priest of the day

Not the Lord nor was he anyones King

300 more years and Enoch flew away

 

Elijah the Prophet, here he did not stay

On a Chariot of fire he did fly away

Two Holy Men no bodies to ever be found

Revelation two men at the Wailing Wall

All must die once, a second death burns

 

Child, live your life like a true Holy man of G-d

Hell is coming on and under the face of the Earth

Pray daily for those you love who have no faith

Separation from G-d is indeed one Hell of a place

Die a second time we will never see the Lord’s Face

Christians/Jews Are Going To Love/Hate This

Christians/Jews Are Going To Love/Hate This

This letter to you today is my beliefs which I have garnered from my 50+ years of studying the Bible, mostly the King James Version. I have also studied other Versions as well plus such Books as makeup the Apocrypha. I am not a ‘know-it-all’ but I am always honest with you in anything that I write. Before I write letters to you I always pray for G-d’s guidance through His Holy Spirit and on Biblical Articles like this one I very much pray for His guidance.

 

I would like to start with the very beginning of the Bible, the Book of Genesis, Chapter #1. The first thing that people need to understand is that there were two Creations spoken of here, not one. First G-d created men and women and G-d told them to go and populate the Earth. This was from “Day #6” you can find this in Chapter#1 Verses 26, 27 and 28. ( written as 1: 26-28) Then there was day# 7 where G-d rested from all His work. If you are reading the Scripture right now did you notice that Adam nor Eve have been spoken of yet? Adam does not come to be until 2:7. There G-d created “a man” and the man “became a living Soul.” This was not said of the men and women that G-d created in Chapter #1. In Chapter 2:18 “And the Lord said (Obviously speaking to another Spiritual Being) “it is not good that the man should be alone, I will make him help that is fit for him.” G-d had not yet made Eve as she was not created until very late in Chapter 2 in Verse #22. Two different Creations of mankind, not just one. You see, Adam was a “special” Bloodline and Eve came from him, his rib. When I am speaking of two creations I am only speaking of two creations of man, not two creations of the planet or of the Galaxy. Folks, the first ‘Creation’ was of the Gentile people, Gentile simply refers to “not a Jew.”  Jesus Himself referred to us Gentiles as “people who before this time (the Resurrection) were not a people.)

 

Have you ever pondered the thought of what happened to Adam and Eve’s first child Cain after he killed his younger brother Abel? Folks please read 4:13-15. When G-d cast Cain out Cain went to the east of Eden into the land of Nod where he met his wife and they had children. I have a question for you, where did she come from? The only people on the Earth at that time was Cain and his Mom and Dad, correct? No, that is obviously incorrect! Please go back to Verse 13, 14 & 15 again please. Cain was driven out “from the face of the Earth.” Obviously “Earth” is not meant as “the planet” it simply meant as the ground/land in that area.

 

In Verse 14 Cain makes a statement to G-d “and it shall come to pass that everyone who finds me will kill me–question for you, every one of whom? The only people on the planet was himself and his Mom and Dad, correct?  No, not correct folks! Now, please look at verse #15: “and the Lord set a mark upon Cain so that any finding him would not kill him.” Whosoever whom, his Mom and Dad? Also, “lest any finding him/Cain,” any finding him, any of who?

 

After the death of Abel, Adam and Eve had a third son and they named him Seth. Then in the last Verse (#26) of Chapter #4 we are told that Seth later has a son. I have a question, who did he have the child with, his Mom? Simply folks, by the time of the ‘Creation’ of Adam and Eve there were hundreds of thousands or even a few million other people (Gentiles) on this rock we call Earth. But, ‘big but’ those people were not of the Royal Bloodline of Adam and Eve.

 

Folks if you or I are not of 100% of the “Royal Bloodline” then you and I are Gentiles! Personally I doubt if there are more than a few hundred of such people on the planet today. I would say that there probably aren’t any if it weren’t for the fact of the 144 thousand of Revelation. There are 12 “Tribes” of Israelites times 12,000 from each Tribe=144,000. This 144,000 are of males who had not been defiled by the woman, meaning virgins. We are told throughout the Scriptures that “Salvation is only of the Jew” in the Old Testament then after the Resurrection we Gentile were grafted into this Holy Family. Yet even in the Book of Revelation Jesus made it clear that “salvation is to the Jew first, then unto the Gentiles.”

 

(Religious Poem) A Hollow Vessel

A HOLLOW VESSEL

 

(A Kab), is a hollow vessel, please be not one

For God’s gathering place is a Holy Dwelling

Know ye not that our body is a Holy Vessel

It is a Promise, a Home to the Spirit of God

 

 

Be ye not vacant, nor your Spirit in living in darkness

For a vacant house is open to the Master of death

Clean thy thoughts O man, for the Lord knows them

Thy heart knows thy words before they touch your lips

 

 

Please, always seek ye purity of heart and of your Soul

There is nothing that we know that was not given before unto us

Kiss the ground and bow thy head O man, walk with eyes wide open

Evil is trying to snare your life and Soul with your every thought

 

 

Friends we must keep the stoop to our Soul as clean as we can

At the door to our Soul, the Lord Jesus stands knocking on our heart

All of our bodies are a Home for a Spirit, either of God or Satan to dwell

If our Soul lacks God, our hollow vessel, all our way to Hell Satan will indwell!

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