6 Countries That Have Banned McDonald’s

(THIS  ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

6 Countries That Have Banned McDonald’s

As one of the biggest restaurant chains in the world, with over 37,000 locations worldwide, McDonald’s is pretty easy to find just about anywhere on the globe. However, it is absent in several countries, and that absence hasn’t always been a choice left up to McDonald’s. Here are six countries that have banned the fast-food mega chain.

Bermuda

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This island paradise has had a ban on foreign fast-food restaurants since the 1970s. Despite this ban, however, there was a McDonald’s built in Bermuda in 1985 – on the U.S. Naval Air Station located on the island. When the base closed in 1995, the McDonald’s left with it.

Despite this setback, McDonald’s made another attempt to plant the golden arches in Bermuda in 1999. This time, however, the fast food ban was upheld, and the McDonald’s was never built.

Iran

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Iran was home to a McDonald’s at one point, but the country began to distance itself from Western culture following the Islamic Revolution of 1979. Tense relations in the decades since make the prospect for a new location unlikely.

Should McDonald’s ever regain a foothold in Iran, however, they may find fierce competition. In their absence, an imitator chain known as Mash Donald’s has been selling burgers for years.

Bolivia

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Bolivia is the only country in Latin America besides Cuba without a McDonald’s. While there is no outright ban on McDonald’s in Bolivia, the Bolivian people and government have not welcomed the burger franchise. In fact, there was a location in La Paz until 2002, but poor sales and pushback from locals, who expressed a desire to buy their burgers from locations not owned by an international business, forced the franchise to close.

After the location had closed, the former president of Bolivia stated that corporations like McDonald’s are “not interested in the health of human beings, only in earnings and corporate profits.”

North Korea

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One of the least surprising countries to appear on this list, North Korea’s aversion to foreign interests has kept the country culturally insulated since the end of the Korean War.

While North Korea may have zero McDonald’s franchises, South Korea has over 850. This led to a famous incident in 2011 when North Korean elites used the national airline to smuggle McDonald’s burgers across the border.

Iceland

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There were three McDonald’s locations in Iceland’s capital of Reykjavik until 2009. Unfortunately, the currency of Iceland, the krona, collapsed when the economy faltered, and all three closed their doors in rapid succession.

Iceland is one of the healthiest countries in the world, and the government has been wary of the consequences of allowing the fast food giant to re-establish itself. An Icelandic fast food chain has popped up in McDonald’s absence, serving locally-sourced meat and produce.

Montenegro

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Government concerns about the impact of a McDonald’s franchise on the health of the population caused the closure of a small McDonald’s in the capital city of Podgorica. The local media supported the departure of the country’s only McDonald’s location, favoring the opportunity for local restaurants to serve the community.

However, the public relations department of the government of Montenegro refuted that claim. Stating that “no company, not even McDonald’s, is ‘forbidden’ to do business in Montenegro.” Despite that lukewarm welcome, however, there are still no McDonald’s location in Montenegro.

These are not the only countries without a single McDonald’s, however. There are dozens of countries without McDonald’s, primarily because the corporation has deemed the local economy or political environment too unstable to support a successful franchise. In fact, many economists consider the arrival of a McDonald’s franchise in a developing world an indicator of economic stability.

7 Countries Without a Legal Drinking Age

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

Out of 195 countries recognized by the United Nations, only about a dozen don’t have a legal drinking age. Some of these countries have a long history of conflict, making them unsafe for travel. Meanwhile, others continue to grapple with infectious viral outbreaks. The remaining seven countries without a legal drinking age, however, can serve as great travel destinations for people of all ages.

Cameroon

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Like other countries on this list, Cameroon has a legal drinking age for alcohol consumption in a public venue. Patrons under age 18 can drink alcohol in a bar or restaurant when accompanied by an adult. These age limits don’t apply when drinking off-premises, however.

Note that, as of July 2019, Cameroon continues to experience political turmoil. Check for travel warnings before heading to Cameroon, but don’t discount this charming and diverse country. Its rich history and culture make it a great adventure travel destination. You’ll also love the pristine white sand beaches, mountains, and rain-forests.

São Tomé & Príncipe

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Africa’s second-smallest nation lies in the Gulf of Guinea and welcomes travelers from around the globe. No age limits exist for alcohol consumption here.

Composed of two islands, São Tomé and Príncipe offer visitors exciting options for water sports, jungle exploration, and ecotourism. With only 7,000 residents, Príncipe is especially geared towards nature-lovers and outdoor-enthusiasts who enjoy unspoiled locales.

Visitors can also take in the Portuguese-inspired architecture on the islands. Be sure to check out the large network of plantations, which once served as the center of global cocoa production. The islands are also famous for their location: you can cross the Equator at Rolas Island, which lies at the southern tip of Sao Tome.

Haiti

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Haiti gained attention in the last decade due to a catastrophic earthquake in 2010. Efforts to rebuild the country continue today. The country draws aid workers and humanitarian organizations that accept volunteers for community development projects. Taking your teenagers to Haiti on a spring or summer vacation will be a trip to remember. There’s no drinking age here. Note, however, that alcohol won’t be sold to minors below 18 years of age.

Meanwhile, don’t forget to visit picturesque beaches on the north shore of Haiti near Cap Haitien, where you can also observe beautiful French colonial architecture.

Antigua and Barbuda

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Nestled in the crystalline waters of the Caribbean, Antigua and Barbuda is another two-island country. Beach lovers and sun-worshipers adore the white and pink sand beaches on these stunning islands.

Above all, opportunities abound for snorkeling and scuba diving excursions. Participate in one of these excursions, and you’ll see amazing marine life living among the island reefs. Those who want to drink at one of Antigua’s world-class restaurants or cafes must be at least 16 years of age. But, don’t fret. No drinking age exists for enjoying a tropical drink elsewhere on the island.

Bermuda

Credit: wwing/ iStock

Like some of the other countries on this list, Bermuda has no drinking age for those who consume alcohol outside of bars and restaurants.

Those who drink in public establishments must be 18 years of age, however. Bermuda is a one-stop-shop vacation destination which offers something for every type of traveler. Beyond the incredible pink sand beaches, Bermuda is also famous for sailing, whale-watching as well as various types of water-sports.

Sports enthusiasts will enjoy hiking and biking through Bermuda’s picturesque landscapes. Meanwhile, golf enthusiasts will appreciate playing a few rounds of golf at one of the island’s championship golf courses.

Grenada

Credit: Falvio-Vallenari/ iStock

Grenada, affectionately known as the “Spice Isle,” is the last Caribbean country without a legal drinking age on this list. Note, however, that those who drink in a bar or restaurant, must be at least 16 years of age.

Although Grenada boasts silky white sand beaches, characteristic of many Caribbean Islands, it’s most famous for its simplistic, laid-back atmosphere.

The country is also known for the beautiful waterfalls at Grand Etang National Park and its diverse British, French, and African-influenced architecture.

Additionally, Grenada is a favorite destination for scuba divers. Aside from its colorful coral reefs, Grenada also has an underwater sculpture park and exciting shipwrecks to explore, such as the famous Bianca C (known as the “Titanic of the Caribbean”).

Cambodia

Credit: Akarat Phasura/ Shutterstock

Cambodia has no drinking age, regardless of whether you’re in a restaurant, bar or another public establishment.

Accommodations are inexpensive, and the country offers multiple experiences for various travel interests. Cambodia is generally safe. For more information, check the travel advisory at the U.S. Department of State when making travel arrangements.

Through the decades, Cambodia’s government has become more open and its citizens have continued to thrive. Don’t skip Phnom Penh, the capital, to learn about Cambodia’s history under the Khmer Rouge and to enjoy some amazing street food. During your stay, you won’t want to miss the famous temples of Angkor Wat, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Beach lovers should head to the south to enjoy some of the most unspoiled beaches in Southeast Asia.

Holidays you won’t believe actually exist

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

Holidays you won’t believe actually exist

There isn’t much that beats a long weekend during a public holiday, one that you can celebrate with your family and friends. Typically, these days mark a significant historical date or commemorate a watershed moment in a society’s past—and sometimes they don’t. Here are some publicly recognized holidays that you won’t believe actually exist.

Fifth of July

Credit: gilaxia / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: United States

Independence Day is one of the most important holidays celebrated in America. It celebrates the virtue that is the core of the American ideology – freedom. The holiday marks the signing of the Declaration of Independence, a document that represents a turning point in United States and world history. It is also a celebration of summer, epitomized by backyard barbecues, company picnics and elaborate fireworks displays.

However, since the Fourth of July is federal holiday on a hard date, it sometimes falls on a weekend. If this is the case, federal employees, schools, and the post office take the following Monday off, and many businesses follow suit. This makes the Fifth of July the holiday. July 5 is also National Bikini Day in the United States, which makes a perfect day to head to the beach.

National Picnic Day

Credit: JaySi / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Australia

The first Monday of August is Picnic Day in the Northern Territory of Australia. Schools are closed, the postal service is suspended, and businesses are expected to give employees the day off.

While it may seem strange to suspend all business activities for something as simple as a picnic, the tradition comes from Australia’s industrial heritage. Picnic Day was originally a company wide event for railroad employees, which soon expanded into a region-wide series of events culminated in the Harts Range Races in Central Australia. However, some groups in Australia celebrate the day to mark a different occasion. It is sometimes used to remember the day when Chinese indentured servants were released from their tasks related to building the North Australia Railway.

Up Helly Aa

Credit: HelenL100 / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Scotland

Up Helly Aa is a celebration of many things: winter, fire, Vikings, and, perhaps most significantly, alcohol. The celebration is held on the last Tuesday in January in multiple locations across the Shetland Islands and typically consists of costumed revelers parading through the streets of the largest nearby town. The festival begins with participants drinking heavily and ends with the burning of a replica Viking ship.

While the tradition might seem steeped in history, it is not, as there is no record of Norse cultures holding a similar event at that time of year. By most accounts, the celebration began as a way to combat public drunkenness and disorder in the early 1800s. Despite all these odd facts, Up Helly Aa is a publicly-recognized holiday, and all government operated offices are closed.

Day of the Sea

Credit: StreetFlash / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Bolivia

A holiday honoring a country’s maritime history wouldn’t be anything out of the ordinary – unless that country was landlocked, as Bolivia is. The Day of the Sea, held every March 23, is the day that Bolivia remembers the loss of their last stretch of oceanfront property, the Port of Caluma. To commemorate the event, participants hold a parade that is accompanied by recordings of ship horns and sea gulls.

Bermuda Day

Credit: wwing / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Bermuda

At first glance, Bermuda Day seems normal enough. What country doesn’t take time to celebrate their heritage and way of life? What makes Bermuda Day intriguing, however, is the specific details of island life highlighted during the event. Bermuda day, celebrated every May 24, is widely known as the first day it is socially acceptable to swim in the ocean and wear shorts to work. In that way, it is a little like casual Friday, except it lasts all summer.

Holidays You may not believe actually exist

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

Holidays you won’t believe actually exist

There isn’t much that beats a long weekend during a public holiday, one that you can celebrate with your family and friends. Typically, these days mark a significant historical date or commemorate a watershed moment in a society’s past—and sometimes they don’t. Here are some publicly recognized holidays that you won’t believe actually exist.

Fifth of July

Credit: gilaxia / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: United States

Independence Day is one of the most important holidays celebrated in America. It celebrates the virtue that is the core of the American ideology – freedom. The holiday marks the signing of the Declaration of Independence, a document that represents a turning point in United States and world history. It is also a celebration of summer, epitomized by backyard barbecues, company picnics and elaborate fireworks displays.

However, since the Fourth of July is federal holiday on a hard date, it sometimes falls on a weekend. If this is the case, federal employees, schools, and the post office take the following Monday off, and many businesses follow suit. This makes the Fifth of July the holiday. July 5 is also National Bikini Day in the United States, which makes a perfect day to head to the beach.

National Picnic Day

Credit: JaySi / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Australia

The first Monday of August is Picnic Day in the Northern Territory of Australia. Schools are closed, the postal service is suspended, and businesses are expected to give employees the day off.

While it may seem strange to suspend all business activities for something as simple as a picnic, the tradition comes from Australia’s industrial heritage. Picnic Day was originally a company wide event for railroad employees, which soon expanded into a region-wide series of events culminated in the Harts Range Races in Central Australia. However, some groups in Australia celebrate the day to mark a different occasion. It is sometimes used to remember the day when Chinese indentured servants were released from their tasks related to building the North Australia Railway.

Up Helly Aa

Credit: HelenL100 / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Scotland

Up Helly Aa is a celebration of many things: winter, fire, Vikings, and, perhaps most significantly, alcohol. The celebration is held on the last Tuesday in January in multiple locations across the Shetland Islands and typically consists of costumed revelers parading through the streets of the largest nearby town. The festival begins with participants drinking heavily and ends with the burning of a replica Viking ship.

While the tradition might seem steeped in history, it is not, as there is no record of Norse cultures holding a similar event at that time of year. By most accounts, the celebration began as a way to combat public drunkenness and disorder in the early 1800s. Despite all these odd facts, Up Helly Aa is a publicly-recognized holiday, and all government operated offices are closed.

Day of the Sea

Credit: StreetFlash / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Bolivia

A holiday honoring a country’s maritime history wouldn’t be anything out of the ordinary – unless that country was landlocked, as Bolivia is. The Day of the Sea, held every March 23, is the day that Bolivia remembers the loss of their last stretch of oceanfront property, the Port of Caluma. To commemorate the event, participants hold a parade that is accompanied by recordings of ship horns and sea gulls.

Bermuda Day

Credit: wwing / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Bermuda

At first glance, Bermuda Day seems normal enough. What country doesn’t take time to celebrate their heritage and way of life? What makes Bermuda Day intriguing, however, is the specific details of island life highlighted during the event. Bermuda day, celebrated every May 24, is widely known as the first day it is socially acceptable to swim in the ocean and wear shorts to work. In that way, it is a little like casual Friday, except it lasts all summer.

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