Baltimore: Trump tweets ‘no human being would want to live there’

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)
(ONE OF THE THINGS THAT I FIND HYPOCRITICAL ABOUT OUR COWARD IN CHIEF IS WHEN HE TALKS TRASH ABOUT BALTIMORE IS THE VERY WELL KNOWN FACT THAT FOR MANY DECADES NOW THE CITY OF NEW YORK THAT HE SEEMS TO LOVE SO MUCH HAS MANY MORE RATS THAN IT DOES HUMAN BEINGS. THIS IS WITHOUT TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THE TWO LEGGED RAT PACK ALSO KNOWN AS THE TRUMP FAMILY TREE WHICH IS ROTTED THROUGH ITS ROOTS.)oped: oldpoet56)

 

Baltimore stands up for its city after Trump tweets ‘no human being would want to live there’

(CNN)Baltimore did not take President Donald Trump’s recent attack of the city lying down. Instead, Charm City was quick to stand up and fight back.

Trump lashed out at another prominent African American lawmaker on Saturday, tweeting that his Baltimore district is a “disgusting, rat and rodent infested mess.”
The President’s tirade was directed at House Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings, who represents Maryland’s 7th Congressional District in the House and recently lambasted conditions at the border. Trump’s attack against Cummings was the latest verbal assault against a minority member of Congress who is a frequent critic of the President.
The President suggested that conditions in Cummings’ district, which is majority black and includes parts of Baltimore, are “FAR WORSE and more dangerous” than those at the US-Mexico border and called it a “very dangerous & filthy place.”
Cummings, the city’s leaders and residents were quick to defend Baltimore. The Twitter hashtag #wearebaltimore was trending Saturday night, with users posting pictures and comments expressing their pride in the city.
“Mr. President, I go home to my district daily,” Cummings wrote on Twitter Saturday in response. “Each morning, I wake up, and I go and fight for my neighbors. It is my constitutional duty to conduct oversight of the Executive Branch. But, it is my moral duty to fight for my constituents.”
Baltimore’s Mayor Jack Young also took the attack to heart, criticizing Trump for disparaging a “vibrant American City.”
“It’s completely unacceptable for the political leader of our country to denigrate a vibrant American City like Baltimore, and to viciously attack U.S. Representative Elijah Cummings a patriot and a hero,” Young tweeted.
The Baltimore Sun’s editorial board published a response, highlighting aspects of the city they felt the president left out: the beauty of Inner Harbor, the history of Fort McHenry, the prominence of Johns Hopkins Hospital, and the national dependency on the Social Security Administration, which is housed in the city.
“And it surely wasn’t about the economic standing of a district where the median income is actually above the national average,” the board wrote.
“Better to have some vermin living in your neighborhood than to be one.”
Other Democrats came to Baltimore’s defense on Saturday, including California Sen. Kamala Harris, whose national 2020 presidential campaign headquarters is located there.
“Baltimore has become home to my team and it’s disgraceful the president has chosen to start his morning disparaging this great American city,” Harris wrote on Twitter.

‘City of good Americans’

Others called out the city’s character: “There’s a block party today on my southside street. This is a city of good Americans who deserve more than a grifting, hollow and self-absorbed failure of a man as their president,” tweeted author David Simon.
And while they defended their city, some had criticisms for Trump.
“It should be beneath the dignity of the President of the United States, the person who is supposed to be the leader of the free world, to disparage and personally attack a great American city and another great American leader,” Baltimore City Council President Brandon Scott told reporters Saturday. “Instead of up upholding his oath of office to put the greater good of all American citizens, no matter where they live and who they voted for above all else, that he decided to do the opposite.”
Many of the elected officials who spoke out praised Cummings, who grew up in Baltimore, for his help in the recent developments the district has undertaken, though they acknowledge there is still more work to do.
“We stand ready and willing to work with the President, if he is willing to go beyond tweets, to help us solve some of the problems that are deep enrooting in Baltimore’s history,” Scott said.

Baltimore Sun: Trump is a Rat and the most dishonest man to ever occupy Oval Office

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HILL NEWSPAPER)

 

Baltimore Sun editorial board lashes out at Trump: ‘Better to have a few rats than to be one’

The Baltimore Sun editorial board ripped President Trump as the “most dishonest man to ever occupy the Oval Office” on Saturday in a scorching piece after Trump referred to Rep. Elijah Cummings‘ (D-Md.) 7th congressional district, which includes west Baltimore, as a “rat and rodent infested mess.”

In a scathing column, the editors of one of the country’s oldest newspapers wrote that Trump himself had more power to affect immediate change in Baltimore than Cummings does, who Trump also targeted for criticism Saturday, and urged him to use the power of the presidency to affect positive change.

“[W]e would above all remind Mr. Trump that the 7th District, Baltimore included, is part of the United States that he is supposedly governing,” the Sun’s editors wrote.

“The White House has far more power to affect change in this city, for good or ill, than any single member of Congress including Mr. Cummings. If there are problems here, rodents included, they are as much his responsibility as anyone’s, perhaps more because he holds the most powerful office in the land,” they added.

The editors then went on to launch into a full-scale attack on Trump, likening him to “vermin.”

“[W]e would tell the most dishonest man to ever occupy the Oval Office, the mocker of war heroes, the gleeful grabber of women’s private parts, the serial bankrupter of businesses, the useful idiot of Vladimir Putin and the guy who insisted there are ‘good people’ among murderous neo-Nazis that he’s still not fooling most Americans into believing he’s even slightly competent in his current post,” they wrote.

“Or that he possesses a scintilla of integrity,” they continued. “Better to have some vermin living in your neighborhood than to be one.”

Trump’s attack on Cummings earlier Saturday came after similar attacks in previous weeks targeting other minority members of Congress including Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), Ayanna Pressley (D-Mass.), Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.), and Rashida Tlaib (D-Mich.).

The House, led by Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-N.Y.) largely condemned the president’s remarks and voted mostly along party lines to label the remarks “racist.”

Teenager Charged in Killing of Baltimore County Officer With Jeep

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON TIMES)

 

Teenager Charged in Killing of Baltimore County Officer With Jeep

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Amy Caprio, a police officer with the Baltimore County Police Department, was killed on Monday on a residential street in the Perry Hall neighborhood.Creditvia Baltimore County Public Safety

A teenager was charged with murder on Tuesday in the death of a Baltimore County police officer who was killed while she was trying to stop a group of people who had broken into a home, the authorities said.

The suspect, Dawnta Anthony Harris Jr., 16, was arrested shortly after the officer, Amy Caprio, was gravely injured around 2 p.m. on Monday, the police said. Officer Caprio, 29, was responding to 911 calls of a suspicious vehicle in a residential cul-de-sac. Mr. Harris told detectives that he ran over Officer Caprio in a Jeep after she ordered the group out of the car, according to court records.

The authorities did not announce Mr. Harris’s arrest until Tuesday morning, when he was charged with first-degree murder as an adult.

The police said they also took three other teenagers into custody on Tuesday who were believed to have been with Mr. Harris. Detectives have linked the group to a string of burglaries in Baltimore County, the police said, but the three other teenagers had not yet been charged in Officer Caprio’s death.

BACO Public Safety@BACOPoliceFire

Police confirm 16yr old male was arrested yesterday shortly after death of officer. Suspect awaiting bail hearing. Name and charges will be released after hearing. More details to follow throughout the day. Three suspects continue to be sought.^SV

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Police officers blocked off a neighborhood in Baltimore County, Md., on Monday while they searched for four people after a police officer was killed.CreditJerry Jackson/The Baltimore Sun, via Associated Press

For nearly 12 hours on Monday, the Baltimore County Police Department locked down the residential neighborhood of Perry Hall as officers methodically combed the area, searching wooded fields and behind homes for the suspects. The search continued past nightfall and picked up in the morning.

Officer Caprio was a four-year veteran with the department. Her death drew a fiery response from the police chief, Terrence B. Sheridan, who said it was a dangerous time for officers in the United States.

“It’s terrible,” Chief Sheridan said on Monday afternoon. “We are seeing something in this country that we have never seen before.”

Fifty-five law enforcement officers have been killed nationwide so far in 2018, a slight increase from the same period last year, according to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund, which tracks officer fatalities. In all of 2017, 129 officers were killed on duty, the second-lowest yearly total in the past six decades, according to the same group.

Residents on Linwen Way in Perry Hall said the episode started when a neighbor spotted four men walking behind a home on the block. That neighbor called 911 to report suspicious activity and then called again when she spotted the men carrying items out of the house and into a dark-colored Jeep on the street, said Tony Kurek, who lives on Linwen Way.

While three people were inside the house, Mr. Harris waited in the driver’s seat of the Jeep, according to court records. As they started to pull out of the cul-de-sac, Officer Caprio, who was on patrol, pulled up and parked her car to block the Jeep, according to Mr. Kurek, whose son Dakota was in the front yard and saw the confrontation unfold.

Her gun drawn, the officer stepped out of her car and ordered the men to exit the Jeep, Mr. Kurek said.

“They hit the throttle and went at her,” Mr. Kurek said in an interview on Tuesday. “The path that they took was right through her and they drove right over and out of the neighborhood.”

Dakota ran to the officer, who was lying motionless on the street, her gun next to her. He then sprinted back to his house to alert his father and older brother, Logan, who is a volunteer firefighter. The three of them ran back to her side.

Logan picked up her radio and screamed, “Officer down! Officer down! Officer down!” He then started CPR.

“She was showing no signs of life,” Mr. Kurek said.

While his oldest son continued the chest compressions, Mr. Kurek ran toward the end of the street to help direct the responding officers and paramedics. By that time, he said, the four men had ditched the Jeep on a nearby street and fled on foot.

Officers stopped Mr. Harris about a block from where they abandoned the Jeep.

Next to the officer’s body was a single bullet casing, according to Mr. Kurek. “She got one shot off,” he said.

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Slain Detective Was Set to Testify in a Police Corruption Probe the Next Day

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME NEWS AND THE ASSOCIATED PRESS)

 

By Associated Press

November 23, 2017

(BALTIMORE) — Baltimore’s police commissioner says a detective killed last week was slain a day before he was set to testify in a corruption probe into activities of indicted police officers.

Commissioner Kevin Davis announced the revelation Wednesday, a week after the detective was shot in the head in a vacant lot.

Rumors have been running rampant in Baltimore about the unsolved case.

Davis emphasizes that Detective Sean Suiter was not the target of any criminal investigation. But he says Suiter was scheduled to testify before a grand jury “the day after he was murdered.”

The grand jury is investigating a group of Baltimore officers who worked together on a firearms crime task force and have been charged with stealing money, property and narcotics from people over two years.

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A new, liberal tea party is forming. Can it last without turning against Democrats?

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON POST)

A new, liberal tea party is forming. Can it last without turning against Democrats?

Angry Utahns pack Chaffetz’s home state town hall
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Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) got a frosty reception in his home state on Feb. 9, at a town hall. Angry constituents packed a high school auditorium, grilled the high-ranking congressman with questions and peppered him with boos and chants while protesters amassed outside.(Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post)
February 11 at 4:50 PM
Grass-roots movements can be the life and death of political leaders.It’s a well-worn story now about how John A. Boehner, then House minority leader, joined a rising star in his caucus, Rep. Kevin McCarthy, in April 2009 for one of the first major tea party protests in the California Republican’s home town of Bakersfield.

A little more than six years later, after they surfed that wave into power, the movement consumed both of them. Boehner was driven out of the House speaker’s office and McCarthy’s expected succession fell apart, leaving him stuck at the rank of majority leader.

Democrats are well aware of that history as they try to tap the energy of the roiling liberal activists who have staged rallies and marches in the first three weeks of Donald Trump’s presidency.

What if they can fuse these protesters, many of whom have never been politically active, into the liberal firmament? What if a new tea party is arising, with the energy and enthusiasm to bring out new voters and make a real difference at the polls, starting with the 2018 midterm elections?

Boycotts and outrage: A new normal on Capitol Hill?

Republicans were forced to reschedule votes for key cabinet picks after Democrats intensified their opposition to President Trump’s nominations. (Video: Alice Li, Whitney Leaming/Photo: Getty/The Washington Post)

The women’s marches that brought millions onto streets across the country the day after Trump’s inauguration — spurred organically through social media — opened Democratic leaders’ eyes to the possibilities.

With a 10-day recess beginning next weekend, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has instructed her members to hold a “day of action” in their districts, including town halls focused on saving the Affordable Care Act. The following weekend, Democratic senators and House members will hold protests across the country, hoping to link arms with local activists who have already marched against Trump.

“It was important to us to make sure that we reach out to everyone we could, to visit with them, to keep them engaged, to engage those that maybe aren’t engaged,” Rep. Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.), chairman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, told reporters at a Democratic retreat in Baltimore that ended Friday. The trick is to keep them aiming their fire at Republicans and Trump, not turning it into a circular firing squad targeting fellow Democrats.

“Now we want people to run for office, to volunteer and to vote,” Luján added.

It’s too early to tell which direction this movement will take, but there are some similarities to the early days of the conservative tea party.

In early 2009, as unemployment approached 10 percent and the home mortgage industry collapsed, the tea party emerged in reaction to the Wall Street bailout. It grew throughout the summer of 2009 as the Obama administration and congressional Democrats pushed toward passage of the Affordable Care Act.

Many of the protesters were newly engaged, politically conservative but not active with their local GOP and often registered as independents. Their initial fury seemed directed exclusively at Democrats, given that they controlled all the levers of power in Washington at the time; the protesters famously provoked raucous showdowns at Democratic town halls over the August 2009 recess.

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer’s first brush with the anti-Trump liberal movement came in a similar fashion to Boehner and McCarthy’s Bakersfield foray in 2009. Originally slated to deliver a brief speech at the women’s march in New York, Schumer instead spent 4 1/2 hours on the streets there, talking to people he had never met. By his estimate, 20 percent of them did not vote in November.

That, however, is where Schumer must surely hope the similarities end.

By the spring and summer of 2010, the tea party rage shifted its direction toward Republican primary politics. One incumbent GOP senator lost his primary, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) defeated the Kentucky establishment favorite, and three other insurgents knocked off other seasoned Republicans in Senate primaries (only to then lose in general elections).

One force that helped the tea party grow was a collection of Washington-based groups with some wealthy donors, notably the Koch-funded Americans For Prosperity, who positioned themselves as the self-declared leaders of the movement. For the next few years, they funded challenges to Republican incumbents, sparking a civil war that ran all the way through the 2016 GOP presidential primaries.

Boehner could never match the rhetorical ferocity of the movement. He was perpetually caught in a trap of overpromising and under-delivering. Republicans never repealed Obamacare, as they derisively called the ACA, and they could not stop then-President Obama’s executive orders on immigration. Boehner resigned in October 2015.

Democrats want and need parallel outside groups to inject money and organization into their grass roots. There are signs it is happening: The thousands of activists who protested at a series of raucous town halls hosted by Republican congressmen over the past week were urged to action in part by sophisticated publicity campaigns run by such professional liberal enterprises as the Indivisible Guide, a blueprint for lobbying Congress written by former congressional staffers, and Planned Parenthood Action.

What is less clear is whether such energy and resources will remain united with Democratic leaders — or will be turned on them, as happened with the tea party and the Republican establishment, if the activist base grows frustrated with the pace of progress.

There have been some signs of liberal disgruntlement toward Democratic leaders. Pelosi and Schumer (D-N.Y.) were jeered by some in a crowd of more than 1,000 that showed up at the Supreme Court two weeks ago to protest Trump’s executive order travel ban. Marchers showed up outside Schumer’s home in Brooklyn, demanding he “filibuster everything” and complaining that he supported Trump’s Cabinet members involved in national security.

But there are two key differences between the conservative and liberal movements: their funding, and their origins. Some anti-establishment liberal groups have feuded with leaders, but they are poorly funded compared with their conservative counterparts. And the tea party came of age in reaction not only to Obama but, before that, to what the movement considered a betrayal by George W. Bush’s White House and a majority of congressional Republicans when they supported the 2008 Wall Street bailout.

There is no similar original sin for Democrats, as the liberal protests have grown as a reaction to Trump, not some failing by Schumer and Pelosi.

Schumer remains unconcerned about the few protesters who are angry at Democratic leaders. “I think the energy’s terrific. Do some of them throw some brickbats and things? Sure, it doesn’t bother me,” Schumer said in a recent interview.

How the liberal activists respond to early defeats may be the next sign of which direction the movement takes. Their demand that Schumer block Trump’s Cabinet is impossible to satisfy, because a simple majority can confirm these picks. All Schumer can do is drag out the debate, which he has done to an unprecedented degree.

The stakes will be even higher for the Supreme Court nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch, whose lifetime appointment still requires a 60-vote supermajority to reach a final confirmation vote. A Trump victory on Gorsuch might deflate the liberal passion, and some think that was the main ingredient missing for Democrats in 2016.

“We just didn’t have the emotional connection,” Pelosi told reporters in Baltimore. “He had the emotional connection.”

‘Where Evil Resides’: Veterans ‘Deploy’ To Standing Rock To Engage The Enemy — The US Government

(THIS ARTICLE IS FROM ‘TASK AND PURPOSE’ WEBSITE)‘Where Evil Resides’: Veterans ‘Deploy’ To Standing Rock To Engage The Enemy — The US Government

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On Dec. 4, if everything goes according to plan, hundreds of veterans will muster at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. The mission: To stop the Dakota Access Pipeline.

“Most civilians who’ve never served in a uniform are gutless worms who’ve never been in a fight in their life,” Wes Clark Jr. declares. “So if we don’t stop it, who will?”

Clark Jr. is one of the most vociferous opponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline, a controversial 1,170-mile project that, if and when it is completed, will shuttle an estimated 470,000 barrels of crude oil every day from North Dakota to Illinois. “It’s immoral, and wrong, and dangerous to us all,” Clark Jr. adds.

He doesn’t fit the traditional tree-hugger mold. He’s not a hippie. Nor is he a member of the Lakota or Dakota tribes, the two Native American group known collectively as the Sioux. He’s a former Army officer and the organizer of an upcoming three-day deployment of U.S. military veterans to the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in southern North Dakota, the site of an escalating months-long standoff between law enforcement-backed security contractors and activists that has so far resulted in multiple injuries, more than 500 arrests, and a United Nations investigation of potential human rights abuses.

According to an “operations order” for the planned engagement, posted to social media in mid-November, “First Americans have served in the Unites States Military, defending the soil of our homelands, at a greater percentage than any other group of Americans. There is no other people more deserving of veteran support.”

Dakota Access Pipeline protesters stand waist deep in the Cantapeta Creek, northeast of the Oceti Sakowin Camp, near Cannon Ball, N.D., Wednesday, Nov. 2, 2016. Officers in riot gear clashed again Wednesday with protesters near the Dakota Access pipeline, hitting dozens with pepper spray as they waded through waist-deep water in an attempt to reach property owned by the pipeline's developer.

Clark Jr. is a 47-year-old writer, political commentator, and activist based in California. Joining him in the fight is Michael A. Wood Jr., a Marine Corps veteran and former Baltimore police officer who retired his badge in 2014 to become an advocate for national police reform. Earlier this month, the duo formed Veterans Stand For Standing Rock with the hope of drawing scores of veterans, as well as fire fighters, ex-law enforcement officers, emergency medical personnel and others to the battleground for a three-day “deployment” in early December to “prevent progress on the Dakota Access Pipeline and draw national attention to the human rights warriors of the Sioux tribes.” Both men say they’re prepared to take a bullet, rubber or otherwise, for a cause they believe should be of critical importance to any patriotic American.

“… if we’re really going to be those veterans that this country praises, well, then we need to do the things that we actually said we’re going to do…”

“This country is repressing our people,” Wood Jr. says. “If we’re going to be heroes, if we’re really going to be those veterans that this country praises, well, then we need to do the things that we actually said we’re going to do when we took the oath to defend the Constitution from enemies foreign and domestic.”

The Standing Rock Sioux Reservation was originally established as part of the Great Sioux Reservation under Article 2 of the Treaty of Fort Laramie of April 29, 1868. In 1877, the U.S. government initiated the still ongoing process of chipping away and dividing the land it had granted to the people of the Lakota and Dakota nations, with significant reductions taking place in 1889 and then again during the 1950s and 1960s, when the Army Corps of Engineers built five large dams along the Missouri River, uprooting villages and sinking 200,000 acres of land below water.

When the Corps of Engineers returned to Standing Rock in 2015, it was to assess whether or not it should approve a path for the Dakota Access Pipeline across the Missouri River, a project that would involve construction on some of the land that had been stripped from the Sioux, who still regard it as sacred — although, that fact seems to have been ignored, maybe even intentionally, in the assessment.

Because the Corps neglected to consult the Standing Rock Sioux, as it was required to do under the National Historic Preservation Act (Section 106), the Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Interior, and the American Council on Historic Preservation all criticized the assessment, but the project was eventually approved. The decision was a major victory for Energy Transfer Partners, the Texas-based parent company of Dakota Access LLC, which estimates the pipeline will bring $156 million in sales and income taxes to state and local governments and create thousands of temporary jobs.

For the Standing Rock Sioux, the Dakota Access project poses two immediate threats. First, the pipeline would run beneath Lake Oahe, the reservoir that provides drinking water to the people of Standing Rock. (An earlier route that avoided native lands was ruled out in part because it posed a danger to drinking water.) Second, according to the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, the building of the pipeline would destroy the sacred spots and burial grounds that were overlooked in the Corps’ assessment. But as the protests have intensified, and more outsiders, including members of more than 200 Native American tribes from across North America, have become involved, Standing Rock has, for some, come to represent something much bigger than a struggle between a disenfranchised people and a government-backed, billion-dollar corporation. It’s a battle to save humanity from itself.

“Mother Earth’s axis is off and it’s never going back,” says Phyllis Young, a Sioux tribal elder. “And we have to help keep it in balance for as long as we can. I am a mother and a grandmother. Those are my credentials to ensure a future with clean drinking water — a future of human dignity, human rights, and human survival.”

A Dakota Access pipeline protester defies law enforcement officers who are trying to force them from a camp on private land in the path of pipeline construction, Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016 near Cannon Ball, ND. Soldiers and law enforcement officers dressed in riot gear began arresting protesters who had set up a camp on private land to block construction of the Dakota Access oil pipeline.

Young grew up on the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation. She has been present at many of the protests and says she’s seen people brutalized at the hands of the security contractors and law enforcement officials guarding the land where the drilling is set to take place. It was Young who got Clark Jr involved. In late summer, she was in Washington, D.C., lobbying for the military to promote an alternative (and scientifically dubious) clean energy source called low-energy nuclear reaction, when she heard of a military veteran who was a forceful advocate for environmental conservation. Clark Jr. was eager to help. He spent weeks trying to assemble a legal team for the Standing Rock Sioux, and even contacted Independent Diplomat, a nonprofit organization that helps governments navigate complex diplomatic processes. “I pulled all of the levers, and none of them worked,” Clark Jr. recalls. Then, in early November, the plan dawned on him: He’d bring his fellow veterans. Lots of them. And they’d come prepared to put their lives on the line.

“We’re not going out there to get in a fight with anyone,” Clark Jr. says. “They can feel free to beat us up, but we’re 100% nonviolence.”

You may have heard of Clark Jr.’s father. Wesley Clark Sr. retired from the Army in 2000 as a four-star general. His career began in the jungles of Vietnam, where he was shot four times during an enemy ambush near Saigon, and culminated in a posting as Supreme Allied Commander Europe during the Kosovo War. In 2004, he ran for the Democratic Party presidential nomination on platform that criticized the Iraq War and called for measures to combat climate change. Clark Jr., who was born in Florida while Clark Sr. was in Vietnam and grew up on military bases throughout the United States and Europe, seems to have inherited both his father’s commanding spirit and his progressive ideals.

Wes Clark Jr. on The Young Turks.

Clark Jr. had just graduated from Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service when he joined the Army as a cavalry officer. He served on active duty from 1992–1996 —  “nothing dangerous,” he says. On Sept. 11, 2001, he was living in New York City, and after seeing the towers fall, he decided to re-enlist. “I was like, ‘I’m going back in. I’m going to go in there and fuck people up,’” he recalls. It was Clark Sr., the decorated war hero, who convinced him not to. As Clark Jr. recalls, his father foresaw U.S. military intervention in Iraq and warned that as a soldier he would be fighting a war that had nothing to do with defeating al Qaeda. “He was right, but I’ll tell you, I’ve never felt worse about a decision in my life,” Clark Jr. says.

Clark Jr. may never have served in combat, but when he talks about Standing Rock, he sounds like a battle-hardened general. This isn’t his first foray into boots-on-the-ground environmental activism. He’s currently working with an organization called Climate Mobilization, which is focused on “building and supporting a social movement that causes the US federal government to commence WWII-scale climate mobilization.” But he’s perhaps best known as a co-host of the political web series The Young Turks. On the The Young Turks website, Clark Jr. is described as an Army veteran “currently trying to save human civilization from climate change.” The impending confrontation at Standing Rock, he says, will be “the most important event up to this time in human history.”

“We’re not going out there to get in a fight with anyone. They can feel free to beat us up, but we’re 100% nonviolence.”

Vets Standing For Standing Rock was announced via an official sounding letter formatted like a five-paragraph military operation order, breaking down the “opposing forces” — “Morton County Sheriff’s office combined with multiple state police agencies and private security contractors” — “Mission,” “Execution” and “Logistics,” among other things. A packing list virtually mirrors the ones issued to soldiers preparing to deploy to the field (minus the weapons). But there are also parts of the document that read like a revolutionary manifesto. Under the section titled “Friendly Forces,” for example, the op order states, “we are there to put our bodies on the line, no matter the physical cost, in complete nonviolence to provide a clear representation to all Americans of where evil resides.”

The document was accompanied by a link to a GoFundMe campaign that has raised nearly $20,000 of its $100,000 goal since it was created on Nov. 11. The money, Clark Jr. says, will only be used for helping volunteers with transportation costs and then bailing those who are arrested out of jail.

Wood Jr. says the op-order was Clark Jr.’s idea, but the two men agree that organizing like a military unit is the smartest approach, especially because most of the people expected to join them on the ground have served.

“It’s simple and we have clearly defined goals, so people don’t get caught up in the confusion,” says Wood Jr., who served with the Baltimore Police Department for more than a decade. “One of the issues the police are going to face is that our level of planning and coordination is vastly superior to theirs, so they may end up with a problem when it comes to that.”

“We’ll have those people who will recognize that they’re not willing to take a bullet, and those who recognize that they are.”

Here then is the plan: On Dec. 4, Clark Jr. and Wood Jr., along with a group of veterans and other folks in the “bravery business,” as Wood Jr. puts it — 500 total is the goal, but they’re hoping for more — will muster at Standing Rock. The following morning they will join members of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, including Young, for a traditional healing ceremony. With an eye toward the media, old military uniforms will be donned so that if the veterans are brutalized by the police, they are brutalized not as ordinary citizens, but as people who once served the government they are protesting against. Then body armor, ear plugs, and gas masks will be issued to those who didn’t bring their own. Bagpipes will play, and traditional Sioux war songs will be sung. The music will continue as everyone marches together to the banks of the Missouri, on the other side of which a line of guards in riot gear will be standing ready with rifles, mace, batons, and dogs. Then, the veterans and their allies — or at least the ones who are brave enough — will lock arms and cross the river in a “massive line” for their “first encounter” with the “opposing forces.” The goal is to make it to the drilling pad and surround it, arm in arm. That will require making it through the line of guards, who have repelled other such attempts with a level of physical force Sioux tribal members and protesters have described as “excessive” — claims that recently prompted a United Nations investigation. Of course, that’s what the body armor and gas masks are for.

“We’ll have those people who will recognize that they’re not willing to take a bullet, and those who recognize that they are,” says Wood Jr. “It’s okay if some of them step back, but Wes and I have no intention of doing so.”

Michael A. Wood Jr.

Of course, as most veterans know full well, even the best plans go out the window the moment the shit hits the fan. It seems probable that the group will be met by fierce resistance from those charged with keeping people out of the construction site. Despite a recent decision by the Corps of Engineers to delay further work on the pipeline, Energy Transfer Partners is still hoping to complete the project by January. The segment that will cross beneath the Missouri at Standing Rock is the last major piece of the puzzle. Strengthening the resolve of the company’s executives is the fact that Energy Transfer Partners CEO Kelcy Warren donated more than $100,000 to elect Donald Trump, and Trump himself owns stock in the company. “I’m 100% sure that the pipeline will be approved by a Trump administration,” Warren told NBC News on Nov. 12.

Nonetheless, Clark Jr. and Wood Jr. remain undeterred. If anything, the likelihood of approval only makes them more determined. After all, this is war.

“The Joint Chiefs of Staff labeled the climate emergency as the number one security threat to the country, and they’ve been labeling it that for years,” Clark Jr. says. “All you need to do is put an overlay on any map in the world where there’s a water and crisis and you’re going to see massive political violence in that location. And unless we act, we’re going to be dealing with that exact same situation right here in the United States.”

Hypocritic Democratic Protesters Rail At Trump For Him Being Honest About Them!

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

President-elect Donald Trump complains about ‘unfair’ protesters as thousands of Americans take to the streets

Donald Trump sat down with President Obama before taking to Twitter to vent his frustration with how "unfair" he thinks the protesters are.

Donald Trump sat down with President Obama before taking to Twitter to vent his frustration with how “unfair” he thinks the protesters are.

(JIM WATSON/AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

After a couple of unusually quiet days, Donald Trump was back to his campaign trail social media tactics Thursday evening, complaining about the thousands of “unfair” protesters demonstrating throughout cities across the country.”Just had a very open and successful presidential election,” Trump tweeted as scores of angry New Yorker’s gathered outside Trump Tower. “Now professional protesters, incited by the media, are protesting. Very unfair!”

The President-elect’s media bashing tweet comes on the heels of a cordial sit-down with President Obama at the White House earlier in the day. The incoming President said he had “great respect” for Obama and commended him on some of the “really great things” he has achieved.

After the meeting, Trump thanked the President for a “fantastic day” with “great chemistry.”

Rage is not the answer

Hundreds gathered outside Trump Tower Thursday to protest Trump's election win.

Hundreds gathered outside Trump Tower Thursday to protest Trump’s election win.

(SPENCER PLATT/GETTY IMAGES)

“Melania liked Mrs. O a lot!” he added, referring to First Lady Michelle Obama.

Trump has become notorious for frequently insulting politicians and journalists over Twitter, but since winning the election Wednesday, he has only sent out two uncharacteristically toned down tweets — one pledging to as President unify the country and another congratulating the Marine Corps on its 241st anniversary.

That spell of politeness broke Thursday, and Twitter users were quick to rip into the President-elect after his latest tirade.

The protesters toted signs and chanted outside the midtown skyscraper.

The protesters toted signs and chanted outside the midtown skyscraper.

(SAM COSTANZA/FOR NEW YORK DAILY NEWS)

“Here we go, again,” Republican strategist Ana Navarro said. “Trump tweeting against protestors & the media. Well, it was nice to see him be presidential for all of, what…40 hours?”

Anti-Trump protests resume for second night across U.S.

The chief strategist for Obama’s presidential campaigns, David Axelrod, also took a jab at the President-elect.

“Not a good look for the POTUS-elect,” he said. “Instead of reaching out, he reaches for his Twitter account. Again! Winners don’t whine. They heal.”

MANDATORY CREDIT; WASHINGTON EXAMINER OUT

Throngs of protesters in Baltimore blocked traffic outside the Ravens’ football stadium. (ARREST THEM FOR BREAKING THE LAWS OF OUR NATION, CHARGE THEM AND  PUT THEM IN JAIL!)(TRS)

(LLOYD FOX/THE BALTIMORE SUN VIA AP)

While Trump was tweeting, tensions remained high on the street outside his building, with hundreds of protesters chanting “we reject the President-elect” and “not our President.”

Paula Sternitzky, 54, of Brooklyn, came to the protests toting a sign emblazoned with the words “F–k Trump” alongside an unflattering hand drawn portrait of the soon-to-be commander-in-chief.

VIDEO: Trump, Obama sit down in historic White House meeting

“Tuesday evening was shock, Wednesday morning it was complete fear,” Sternitzky told the Daily News about her reaction to the election results. “I’m genuinely scared about what a President Trump could do to this country.”

Verane Frediani, 42, of Lille, France, was visiting the city for a couple of days, and said she came to the protest to show that Trump’s election upset is sending shock waves beyond U.S. borders.

“We have the extreme right as well so I think it’s important to come out and show that this is a problem,” Frediani told The News, referencing the controversial leader of France’s National Front party, Marine Le Pen, who was among the first European politicians to congratulate Trump on his win. “We’re breathing the same political air and everything he said about immigrants, about women — it’s not okay.”

Meanwhile, some 600 protesters outraged over the outcome of the election marched to the M&T Bank Stadium where the Ravens were hosting the Cleveland Browns for Thursday Night Football.

LUPICA: Grace from Obama, Clinton and Trump after ugly campaigns

Woman throwing laundry detergent at protesters here at the march here in

 Throngs of demonstrators blocked traffic and lay down in the middle of roadways nearby the stadium, but otherwise remained peaceful. Police said at least two people were detained, but not charged, in the commotion.

Discontent with the President-elect turned violent in Portland, Ore., where officials announced around 9 p.m. local time that the protests had turned into “a riot” as demonstrators marched onto major highways.

“Due to extensive and criminal and dangerous behavior, protest is now considered a riot,” the Portland Police Department said in a tweet.

Hundreds of protesters in Washington, D.C. came out for a second night of protests.  

Hundreds of protesters in Washington, D.C. came out for a second night of protests.

(JOSHUA ROBERTS/REUTERS)

The Oregon Department of Transportation shut down traffic on portions of Interstate 5 and 84 as police tried to deescalate the situation.

Muslim women assaulted on campuses as fear of Islamophobia rises

A bizarre Twitter video showed a female motorist swinging at protesters and dousing them in laundry detergent after they blocked traffic on the Hawthorne Bridge near the city’s downtown area.

In another part of the city, a protester was arrested for hurling a Molotov cocktail into a bonfire and cops reported widespread vandalism, graffiti and street fires.

 Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti called the protests in his city "a beautiful expression of democracy." 

 Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti called the protests in his city “a beautiful expression of democracy.”

(AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

For the second night in a row, thousands of protesters marched through both Washington D.C. and Philadelphia, holding signs emblazoned with slogans like “Not Our President” and “Make America Safe For All.”

A large crowd gathered outside the Philly’s historic City Hall chanted, “We must remember to love ourselves and each other, not our President.”

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, a Democrat, condemned a “very, very small group of people” disrupting otherwise peaceful protests after 28 people were arrested for blocking traffic and vandalizing some buildings and a news truck.

Besides the arrests, Garcetti commended the protesters on exercising their democratic rights.

“I actually thought it was a beautiful expression of democracy,” Garcetti said at a news conference. “I think it was a marvelous thing to see the next generation of this country get engaged and involved.”

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