Argentina: 4 Things to Do in Ushuaia, Earth’s Southernmost City

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

4 Things to Do in Ushuaia, Earth’s Southernmost City

Not many people have the opportunity to explore the southernmost city in the world: Ushuaia, Argentina. But those who do will find that the former navy base nestled between high Argentinian peaks and the Beagle Channel has been transformed into an adventure destination complete with five-star hotels, world-class restaurants, and even a couple of casinos. Here are four of the most exciting things you can do when you visit Ushuaia.

Visit the End of the World

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Ushuaia likes to call itself the city at the end of the world, so why not take the time to see the real thing? Visit the Les Eclairs lighthouse, a white and red obelisk that sits on a rock in the middle of the Beagle Channel. The lighthouse is the last vestige of civilization before Antarctica, and there really isn’t another lighthouse like it in the world.

While you’re exploring the end of the world, you would do well to take some time to navigate the Beagle Channel that it sits in. From the water you will enjoy breathtaking views of the Patagonia surroundings, mountaintops, and one of the best views of Ushuaia itself. You can also cruise past the Isla de Pajaros, known for its large bird population, and the Isle de los Lobos, home to a colony of sea lions.

Get into the Snow

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As the southernmost point of South America, Ushuaia and the surrounding mountains receive a good amount of snow during their winter months of June through September. Take advantage of the snow at the nearby ski resort, Cerro Castor. While Cerro Castor may not be as expansive as some of the resorts closer to Buenos Aires, it is a great place to get a few runs in over the course of an afternoon. The resort is also a great entry point for a cross-country skiing adventure, if that is more your speed.

Another great way to enjoy the South American winter is to take a dog sled ride. Getting pulled through the forest by a team of Siberian huskies is an experience you’ll be hard-pressed to find anywhere else. A dog sled ride is also an excellent option if you are travelling with children, who will never forget meeting these amazing animals and being pulled through the snow behind them.

Explore the Patagonian Countryside of Tierra Del Fuego

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If you find yourself in Ushuaia during the warmer months, take some time to explore the Patagonian countryside. This unique landscape has held a special allure for explorers and adventurers for generations, and the Tierra Del Fuego offers many great places to take in the region.

Hike to Laguna Esmerelda, a colorful body of water surrounded by steep mountains, or kayak away from your camping spot on the edge of Lago Roca, where you’ll glide over calm glacial waters for a relaxing afternoon.

If you prefer not to hike, you can instead take the End of the World Train through Tierra del Fuego. This railroad once took the convicts who occupied the prison camp in Ushuaia to work at Mt Susana. The train now offers a guided tour in multiple languages alongside views of the Pipo River, Macarena cascade, and the rugged mountains surrounding the landscape.

Take in Argentinian History

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Learn about the history of the ancient Patagonia region at the End of the World Museum. Here you’ll find exhibits that date from the pre-Columbian era to the 20th century. You can also learn about the lives of the prisoners who were sentenced to stay cut off from society in Ushuaia at the Museuo Maritime y del Presido de Ushuaia. At this museum you’ll have to chance to walk the somber hallways and enter the claustrophobic cells that caged some of the most dangerous criminals in South America from 1920 to 1947.

Your adventure doesn’t need to end there, however. There are many restaurants that offer high quality Argentinian dishes, bars and clubs that will let you unwind after a long day of exploring, and many other experiences you won’t find anywhere else but at the end of the world.

5 Best Places to See Wild Penguins Beyond Antarctica

(THIS ARTICLE IS CUTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

5 Best Places to See Wild Penguins Beyond Antarctica

Penguins may be rare to see in the wild, but that doesn’t mean you have to go all the way to Antarctica to catch a glimpse of them in their natural habitat. There are between 17 and 19 species of penguin that currently exist on the planet, mostly in the Southern Hemisphere. Unfortunately, the penguin population is declining because of climate change, overfishing, and pollution, all of which have had a drastic impact on the places they call home.

Cape Town, South Africa

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South Africa’s southern tip is home to the African penguin, particularly at Boulders Beach just outside of Cape Town. The African penguin is one of the endangered species, having lost 80 percent of its population over the past 50 years. The penguin colony in Africa, which begins in southern Namibia and goes all the way down to Port Elizabeth in South Africa, began not too long ago, in 1983. They migrated from Dyer Island to reach the plentiful food source at Boulders Beach. Thanks to conservation efforts, there are now more than 3,000 African penguins in the Boulders Beach colony, so plenty to see here where penguins are concerned. Boulders Beach is located inside of Table Mountain National Park, and aside from penguin viewing with magnificent views, the area is also great for swimming, hiking, wind sailing, and plenty of other wildlife viewing opportunities.

Tierra del Fuego, Argentina and Chile

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The Tierra del Fuego archipelago at the southernmost part of South America is separated from the mainland by the Strait of Magellan. Two-thirds of the area is Chilean and one-third is Argentine. The islands of Tierra del Fuego are where Magellanic, Humboldt, Rockhopper, Gentoo, and King penguins can be found in the wild. Penguins can be reached via the southernmost city in the world: Ushuaia, Argentina. From there, you can find day tours to visit the penguins, some even offering the chance to walk among them (in tour groups that never exceed 20 people). Here the penguins, often in crowds of hundreds, waddle adorably along the shore.

Galapagos Islands, Ecuador

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Most penguins don’t live in tropical climates, nor in the Northern Hemisphere; in fact, only the endangered Galapagos penguins do, and they live here year-round. This is unusual for penguins, as they usually migrate with the seasons. The western Galapagos islands have much cooler water, and that is where many of the penguins can be found, namely on Fernandina Island or Isabela Island. No tour of the Galapagos Islands would be complete without visiting the penguins. Likely you will see the penguins from a boat, but if your tour offers swimming, you may very well find yourself in the rare circumstance of being in the water alongside these cute little guys. The Galapagos National Park Service does not allow tourists in certain areas, so before booking a tour, it’s best to determine with them that you will be able to see the penguins from a reasonable distance.

Phillip Island, Australia

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The smallest species of all penguins, called the Little Penguin, live mainly on Phillip Island, about a 90-minute drive from Melbourne (where you can also see koalas, seals, whales, anteaters, and wallabies). The only other place they can be found is in New Zealand. These penguins are about a foot tall and weigh less than 3 pounds. Today, the most typical way to see them is from an elevated viewing platform when they get back from the day’s fishing to feed their young. If you would like to see this grand parade of penguins up-close, there are limited tour options available, allowing people to walk among the penguins on a remote beach.

Sub-Antarctic New Zealand

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While 13 species of penguin have been spotted in New Zealand, only nine breed there, and only three on the mainland. Those three, which people can visit, are the Little Penguin, the Hoiho Penguin, and the Fiordland Crested Penguin. You can see the Little Penguin in the evening or at night when they are on shore in Oamaru, Akoaroa Harbour, Marlborough Sounds, Dunedin, and Stewart Island. At Otago Peninsula, not too far south from Dunedin, you’ll be able to visit the rare, yellow-eyed Hoiho Penguins up-close in their natural habitat. The Fiordland Crested Penguin is one of the rarest of them all, and they live on New Zealand’s South Island in the rainforests of Lake Moeraki, Stewart Island, Fiordland, and Haast. Because these wild penguins are on the decline, many tour operators offer sustainable ecotourism.

Some penguin species are endangered and some aren’t (yet). The best time to pay wild penguins a visit, outside of Antarctica, is during the Southern Hemisphere summer season. During this time these charming tuxedoed creatures spend more time breeding and nesting onshore.

5 Southernmost Capitals in the World

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

5 Southernmost Capitals in the World

All of the world’s top five southernmost capitals are located in the temperate zone of the southern hemisphere, and nearly all are oceanic. These cities, by and large, enjoy milder climates than regions at higher latitude and experience winters from June to September. Trade, education, and multiculturalism are hallmarks of the southernmost capitals of the world, which make them must-see sites for those with wanderlust.

5. Cape Town, South Africa

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The oldest city in South Africa is also one of the world’s southernmost capitals. The coastal “Mother City” is known for its harbor and as a destination for expats and immigrants. It is the oldest urban center of South Africa, dating back to 1652 when it served as a supply station for Dutch ships. The region was first described in writing by Portuguese explorer Bartolomeu Dias in 1488, and little is known of its first inhabitants. The nation’s end to Apartheid was marked in the 1990s, and the city currently serves as a multicultural hub. South Africans predominantly speak English with Afrikaans and Xhosa following in second and third.

4. Buenos Aires, Argentina

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The city of “fair winds” is the fourth southernmost capital in the world. As of 1994, an Argentinian constitutional amendment in the wake of a long political battle granted the city autonomy through federalization. As such, it is no longer part of the province of the same name. Quality of life in Buenos Aires is ranked among the highest in Latin America for its multicultural citizens. It is a “World City” or “alpha city,” referring to its significance in global trade, and is home to European architectural influences as well as a rich cultural heritage.

3. Montevideo, Uruguay

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Montevideo is the third southernmost capital city in the world and the southernmost in the Americas. The City’s history dates back to 1724 when Bruno Mauricio de Zabala of Spain founded the city as a strategic move in the Spanish-Portuguese regional dispute. The name of the city remains a subject of debate to this day, though there is agreement that “Monte” refers to the hill “Cerro de Montevideo” across the bay. The capital of Uruguay, Montevideo is the ninth-highest income-earning city in the world, serving as an economic, cultural, and technological hub. Montevideo is home to many of the nation’s top institutes of higher learning and the nation’s chief port.

2. Canberra, Australia

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The capital of Australia, in addition to its being located at one of the lowest latitudes among capital cities, also makes the top ten list for largest cities in the world. In fact, it was the size of Canberra that led to its selection as a capital in 1902 over rivaling-sized Melbourne. Similar to Brasilia and Washington, D.C., the development of Canberra was entirely planned. Although the first World War and the Great Depression affected world trade to the extent of hindering initial plans for the Australian capital, modern Canberrans enjoy the influences of the garden city movement with large expanses of natural vegetation as well as geometric design motifs like circles, triangles, and hexagons.

1. Wellington, New Zealand

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With a little over 400,000 residents, Wellington is the most populous urban area of New Zealand. Situated between Cook Strait and the Remutaka Range, Wellington is both the world’s southernmost capital and the windiest city in the world. Home to the New Zealand Symphony Orchestra, the New Zealand Ballet, and the world’s largest wooden building (the Government building), Wellington has served as New Zealand’s capital since 1865. Though the city serves as the nation’s chief port, most of Wellington’s economy is service-based with a focus on business, finance, and social services.

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The 6 Longest Shared Borders in the World

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

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6 Longest Shared Borders in the World

Borders are the geographical limits between countries, federal states, sovereign states and subnational entities. Some have stayed the same for centuries while others are the subject of constant negotiation among politicians and state officials. Borders come in a whole host of forms. Around the world there’s unscalable fencespainted cobblestones and even a public library separating two countries. Here we’ll take a look at the longest shared borders on our planet.

Bangladesh–India (2,582 miles)

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India borders seven different countries; one of them, Bangladesh, is surrounded almost entirely by Indian territory. The dividing line is a crazy zigzagging marker that separates Bangladesh from the Indian states of West Bengal, Meghalaya, Assam, Tripura and Mizoram. It was drawn up during the 1947 Partition of British India, when the province of Bengal became the Indian state of West Bengal and the Pakistani province of East Bengal. East Bengal became Bangladesh in 1971. Some suggest that the China-India border is longer, but India’s Ministry of Home Affairs says otherwise.

China–Russia (2,615 miles)

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Russia and China are the largest and third largest counties in the world, respectively. Incredibly China shares borders with 14 countries and Russia has borders in both Asia and Europe. No surprise, then, that these two giant land masses make our list. The border has two non-contiguous sections. The eastern section travels for 2,500 miles from a China–Mongolia–Russia triple border to the Tumen River. The 115-mile-long western section starts atop Tavan Bogd mountain and ends where the two counties converge with Kazakhstan.

China–Mongolia (2,906 miles)

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Of all of its 14 bordering countries, the one that China touches most is Mongolia. Curiously, the east and west points of the border are both triple borders between China, Mongolia and Russia. The westernmost point is by far the most impressive as it stands close to the summit of the 14,350-feet-tall mountain massif Tavan Bogd. It also runs through the heart of the dunes and mountains of the Gobi Desert.

Argentina–Chile (3,293 miles)

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Argentina is about four times as large as Chile; however, the enormous lengths of both countries mean that they have the third-longest border. It begins at a triple frontier between Argentina, Bolivia and Chile and then travels south across the snowy peaks of the Southern Andes before weaving through the Tierra del Fuego archipelago. The southernmost section, called the Southern Patagonian Ice Field, is under constant political debate. The Beagle Channel and the 22,615-feet-tall Ojos del Salado, which is the world’s highest stratovolcano, are some major natural landmarks found on the border.

Kazakhstan–Russia (4,254 miles)

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Russia gets its second entry in the list with its huge border with Kazakhstan, itself the world’s ninth largest country. At its southernmost point, the border sits on a peninsula that stretches out into the Caspian Sea. It then meanders through the remote north of Kazakhstan and south of Russia, areas characterized by green pastures, hundreds of lakes and isolated villages. In 2018 Kazakhstan launched a tourism development program to improve bilateral tourism and make border crossings smoother.

U.S.–Canada (5,525 miles)

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At number one on our list, and the clear winner by over a thousand miles, is the border shared between the world’s second and fourth largest countries. It passes through 13 U.S. states and eight Canadian provinces and is broken up into two segments. There’s the east to west border of continental U.S. and a north to south section that incorporates Alaska, the Yukon Territory and part of British Columbia. Four of the Great Lakes straddle the border, as does Niagara Falls and the Thousand Islands.

Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas): Truth, Knowledge And The Known History Of

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE CIA WORLD FACTBOOK)

 

Falkland Islands (Islas Malvinas)

Introduction Although first sighted by an English navigator in 1592, the first landing (English) did not occur until almost a century later in 1690, and the first settlement (French) was not established until 1764. The colony was turned over to Spain two years later and the islands have since been the subject of a territorial dispute, first between Britain and Spain, then between Britain and Argentina. The UK asserted its claim to the islands by establishing a naval garrison there in 1833. Argentina invaded the islands on 2 April 1982. The British responded with an expeditionary force that landed seven weeks later and after fierce fighting forced an Argentine surrender on 14 June 1982.
History The islands are referred to in the English language as “[The] Falkland Islands”. This name dates from an expedition led by John Strong in 1690, who named the islands after his patron, Anthony Cary, 5th Viscount Falkland. The Spanish name for the islands, “Islas Malvinas”, is derived from the French name “Îles Malouines”, bestowed in 1764 by Louis Antoine de Bougainville, after the mariners and fishermen from the Breton port of Saint-Malo who became the island’s first known settlers. The ISO designation is “Falkland Islands (Malvinas)”.

As a result of the continuing sovereignty dispute, the use of many Spanish names is considered offensive in the Falkland Islands, particularly those associated with the 1982 invasion of the Falkland Islands.[7] General Sir Jeremy Moore would not allow the use of Islas Malvinas in the surrender document, dismissing it as a propaganda term.

Geography Location: Southern South America, islands in the South Atlantic Ocean, east of southern Argentina
Geographic coordinates: 51 45 S, 59 00 W
Map references: South America
Area: total: 12,173 sq km
land: 12,173 sq km
water: 0 sq km
note: includes the two main islands of East and West Falkland and about 200 small islands
Area – comparative: slightly smaller than Connecticut
Land boundaries: 0 km
Coastline: 1,288 km
Maritime claims: territorial sea: 12 nm
continental shelf: 200 nm
exclusive fishing zone: 200 nm
Climate: cold marine; strong westerly winds, cloudy, humid; rain occurs on more than half of days in year; average annual rainfall is 24 inches in Stanley; occasional snow all year, except in January and February, but does not accumulate
Terrain: rocky, hilly, mountainous with some boggy, undulating plains
Elevation extremes: lowest point: Atlantic Ocean 0 m
highest point: Mount Usborne 705 m
Natural resources: fish, squid, wildlife, calcified seaweed, sphagnum moss
Land use: arable land: 0%
permanent crops: 0%
other: 100% (99% permanent pastures, 1% other) (2005)
Irrigated land: NA
Natural hazards: strong winds persist throughout the year
Environment – current issues: overfishing by unlicensed vessels is a problem; reindeer were introduced to the islands in 2001 for commercial reasons; this is the only commercial reindeer herd in the world unaffected by the 1986 Chernobyl disaster
Geography – note: deeply indented coast provides good natural harbors; short growing season
People Population: 3,105 (July 2007 est.)
Age structure: 0-14 years: NA
15-64 years: NA
65 years and over: NA
Population growth rate: 2.44% (2007 est.)
Birth rate: NA
Death rate: NA
Net migration rate: NA
Infant mortality rate: total: NA
male: NA
female: NA
Life expectancy at birth: total population: NA
male: NA
female: NA
Total fertility rate: NA
HIV/AIDS – adult prevalence rate: NA
HIV/AIDS – people living with HIV/AIDS: NA
HIV/AIDS – deaths: NA
Nationality: noun: Falkland Islander(s)
adjective: Falkland Island
Ethnic groups: British
Religions: primarily Anglican, Roman Catholic, United Free Church, Evangelist Church, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Lutheran, Seventh-Day Adventist
Languages: English

Russia Says Trump Putin Meeting Will Happen At G20

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NEWSWEEK)

 

RUSSIA DOESN’T BELIEVE DONALD TRUMP ABOUT WHY HE CANCELED PUTIN MEETING AND SAYS IT’LL HAPPEN ANYWAY

Russian government officials said President Donald Trump canceled his meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin on the sidelines of the G20 meeting in Argentina because he was having trouble with the “U.S. domestic political situation.”

On Thursday, Trump announced he was canceling the meeting he had scheduled with Putin because of Russia’s refusal to release Ukrainian sailors who were detained last Sunday during a standoff between Ukrainian and Russian troops in the Kerch Strait, which separates the Black Sea from the Sea of Azov. The confrontation led caused Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko to declare martial law in 10 of Ukraine’s regions that are in proximity to Russian military capabilities.

But Russian officials said that the situation in Ukraine wasn’t the real reason that Trump opted to cancel the much-anticipated meeting with Putin.

“Was the provocation organized by Kiev in this region the real reason for cancellation?” Maria Zakharova, the Kremlin’s spokeswoman, asked during a press conference. “Publicly, we heard just such an explanation; we took note of it. Is this a reality?…I think that you still need to look for answers in the U.S. domestic political situation.”

gettyimages-1066356068-594x594Michael Cohen, former personal attorney to President Donald Trump, exits a New York City federal court on November 29.DREW ANGERER/GETTY IMAGES

On Friday, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov, known to be Putin’s right-hand man, suggested that the two leaders would engage in a “brief and impromptu” meeting at the G20, even if an official meeting is not scheduled, according to reports.

Trump’s cancellation came just hours after Michael Cohen, the president’s former longtime lawyer and fixer,  pleaded guilty to lying to Congress about his attempts to launch a Trump Tower project in Moscow at the same time Trump was running for president. Cohen had originally testified that he had dropped the proposal in January 2016, but recently admitted that negotiations had continued until June 2016.

Cohen began cooperating with special counsel Robert Mueller, who is investigating potential collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia to influence the outcome of the 2016 presidential election, since he pleaded guilty in August to eight felonies. He is considered a key witness in the Mueller case and, having worked with Trump for more than a decade, could reveal many details about the inner workings of Trump’s business empire and its ties to Russia.

Trump said his longtime colleague was lying to obtain a reduced sentence, and continued to call the investigation into collusion with Russia a “witch hunt.”

Nevertheless, the Mueller investigation appears to be gaining speed since Trump submitted written answers to the investigators’ questions through his lawyers. Mueller is believed to be focusing his attention on the Trump Tower deal and connections between Trump associates and the radical transparency organization Wikileaks.

It’s possible, however, that the Russia investigation and the ongoing conflict between Russia and Ukraine, which is now almost in its fifth year, will derail the relationship between Trump and Putin entirely.

AN F.U. Statement To The World: Saudi Crown Prince Arrives in Argentina

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF SAUDI NEWS AGENCY ASHARQ AL-AWSAT)

 

Saudi Crown Prince Arrives in Argentina

Wednesday, 28 November, 2018 – 10:15
Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. Saudi Press Agency/Handout via REUTERS/File Photo
Asharq Al-Awsat

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdulaziz, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Defense, arrived in Argentina on Wednesday after leaving Tunisia on the last leg of his Arab tour.

Upon leaving Carthage Presidential Palace, the Crown Prince was seen off by Tunisian President Beji Caid Essebsi, the Saudi Press Agency reported.

At the Presidential Airport, the Crown Prince was also seen off by Tunisian Prime Minister Youssef Chahed, and a number of senior officials, it said.

Crown Prince Mohammed will attend the G20 summit in Buenos Aires at the end of this week.

His Arab tour included Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, Egypt and Tunisia.

Argentina’s missing submarine found a year after it vanished with 44 aboard

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

Argentina’s missing submarine found a year after it vanished with 44 aboard

Buenos Aires (CNN)A missing Argentine naval submarine has been found, a year and a day after it vanished in the South Atlantic with 44 crew members on board, authorities said Saturday.

The wreckage of the ARA San Juan, which “suffered an implosion,” was found about 870 meters (2,850 feet) down on the ocean floor, Argentine Naval Captain Gabriel Attis later told reporters in Buenos Aires.
Family members at the navy headquarters were shown three images of the remains of the San Juan’s “sail,” or tower, and bow sections.
Hours before the wreckage was positively identified, the Argentine navy tweeted an image of a point of interest on the seabed, suggesting that a 60-meter-long object might be the missing vessel. It was found by an American company contracted by Argentina to locate the submarine.
Footage showed relatives of the lost submariners grieving in the northern port of Mar del Plata, the submarine’s home base, as they received the news that the submarine had been found. It’s not yet clear what condition the vessel is in or whether it will be possible to recover it.
Relatives of the missing crew embrace Thursday, November 15, 2018, after a ceremony marking the anniversary of the ARA San Juan's disappearance at a navy base in Mar del Plata, Argentina.

The ARA San Juan disappeared November 15 last year off Argentina’s coast, about midway on its journey from Ushuaia in the country’s south to Mar del Plata.
The Argentine navy said in the following days that the vessel’s captain had reported a short circuit in the vessel’s battery system shortly before the last known contact. The short circuit was caused by seawater entering the vessel’s “snorkel,” a tube that reaches the surface to refresh the vessel’s air and recharge the batteries, the captain said in a call to his commander on land.
Days later, it emerged that a sound consistent with an explosion had been detected in the ocean near the sub’s last known location by the United States and an international nuclear weapons monitor.
The hunt for the vessel — which at its height involved 28 ships and nine airplanes from 11 nations, including the United States and United Kingdom — centered on an area roughly 900 kilometers (559 miles) off the Argentine coast.
Relatives of crew members prayed for their return in Mar del Plata even as hopes dwindled that the diesel-powered submarine would be found before the air supply ran out.
The Argentine navy called off its rescue operation about two weeks after the sub’s disappearance, saying there was “no chance of survival” for its crew, but search efforts continued.
Among those lost was Eliana Maria Krawczyk, Argentina’s first female submarine officer.
Argentina's first female submarine officer, Eliana Krawczyk, was among the crew of the ARA San Juan.

Ocean Infinity, a US company specializing in deep water search and recovery, began looking for the ARA San Juan in September, using autonomous underwater vehicles operated by a team on board its ship Seabed Constructor, the firm said in a news release. The same ship was previously involved in the search for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370.
Three Argentine navy officers and four family members of the crew of the ARA San Juan were invited on board as observers for the search mission, Ocean Infinity said.
The vessel’s loss raised questions over the navy’s maintenance of its submarine fleet.
The ARA San Juan was an old diesel submarine, built in Germany in the mid-1980s but was refitted with new engines and batteries around five years before its disappearance, Peter Layton, a visiting fellow at the Griffith Asia Institute at Griffith University in Australia, told CNN last year.
The sub was designed to have a shelf life of around 30 years, which had expired, he said. If intact after the explosion, the hull could have been expected to withstand ocean depths up to around 500 to 600 meters, he said. Below that, it would buckle under pressure.

Argentina Is In Crisis, In Danger Of Collapse From The Inside, Government Is Aloof

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF BRAZIL 247 NEWS)

 

Argentine ex-president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner charged with treason

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON POST)

 

Argentine ex-president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner charged with treason

 1:06
Argentine ex-president Fernández charged with treason

According to a court ruling on Dec. 7, a federal judge asked for the arrest of Argentine ex-president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner. 

 December 7 at 6:04 PM
 A federal judge on Thursday indicted former president Cristina Fernández de Kirchner on treason charges and sought her arrest over allegations that she covered up possible Iranian involvement in the 1994 bombing of a Jewish community center in Buenos Aires.In court documents, Judge Claudio Bonadio accused Fernández of obfuscating the Iranian role in the attack, which killed 85 people, in exchange for a potentially lucrative trade deal. The court requested the lifting of her immunity from prosecution, a protection she enjoys as a sitting senator.

Underscoring the seriousness of the charges, authorities conducted raids linked to the case on Thursday, arresting three of Fernández’s former aides and associates. Héctor Timerman, her former foreign minister, was placed under house arrest.

The charges stem from an investigation initially conducted by Alberto Nisman, a crusading prosecutor who accused Fernández of a coverup in 2015 and was later found dead in the bathroom of his apartment with a bullet in his right temple.

Though rare, the lifting of parliamentary protection is not unprecedented. In October, Congress voted to lift the protection afforded to her former planning minister, Julio De Vido, who was facing charges of fraud and corruption.

Fernández, a Peronist, served as president of Argentina from 2007 to 2015 and once formed part of a cadre of left-leaning leaders in Latin America, including Venezuela’s late Hugo Chávez. She has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing while in office, and on Thursday she lashed out at the fresh charges.

“This has nothing to do with justice or democracy,” Fernández told reporters in Buenos Aires. “There’s no cause, no crime, no motive. There was a judgment without cause. God knows it, the government knows it, President [Mauricio] Macri knows it, too.”

There is little precedent for prosecuting treason in Argentina. Local media has reported that the country’s only previously applied charge of treason dates to 1936, when Maj. Guillermo Mac Hannaford was accused of selling information to Bolivia and Paraguay.

And while Fernández has only about a dozen hardcore supporters in the Senate, observers say it doesn’t look probable that the chamber will revoke her immunity. Some argue that such a move could risk turning her into a political martyr for a left-wing Peronist movement that has been losing traction in the country since Macri took office in 2015.

The charges come a month after a new police report reignited the Nisman case, which has captivated Argentina. His mysterious death came only days after he alleged that Fernández and Timerman had colluded to shield Iran’s role in the car-bomb attack on the AMIA jewish community center. In 2005, Nisman concluded that Ibrahim Hussein Berro, a Hezbollah operative from Lebanon with Iranian backing, had carried out the act of terrorism.

An initial report concluded that Nisman had died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound. But a new police report obtained by the Associated Press in November listed key evidence that suggested foul play. Nisman’s nasal septum, for instance, was broken and he had suffered blows to his hip and elsewhere. A strong anesthetic was found in his body.

Before his death, Nisman reportedly wiretapped officials and uncovered information in connection to a “Memorandum of Understanding’ that Argentina signed with Iran on January 27, 2013, in Ethiopia. He argued that it outlined a plan to “collaborate with Iran on its goal to accelerate and support nuclear development” in exchange for an oil-for-grain trade deal and a finding by Argentina that the Iranians were innocent in the 1994 attack, official court documents said.

However, the timing of Fernández’s indictment also focuses the  spotlight on Bonadio, the judge. He is under investigation over allegations of money laundering and illicit enrichment, with some critics suggesting that he may be targeting Fernández as a smokescreen.

“The higher his profile, the more involved he is in politically sensitive cases and the less able anyone will be to bring him down for corruption,” said Mark Jones, a fellow of political science at Rice University’s Baker Institute. “He’ll be able to deflect them as being politically motivated.”

Faiola reported from Miami.

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