Syrian President Assad Blasts Trump As An Animal

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE BRITISH ‘EXPRESS’ NEWS)

Home

News

Syria President Bashar al-Assad HITS BACK at Trump and calls the US President an ‘ANIMAL’

SYRIAN President Bashar al-Assad has branded President Donald Trump an “animal” as he hit back at the US leader for describing him with the same derogatory term.

Assad to Trump ‘you are what you say you are’

Assad to Trump ‘you are what you say you are’
Replay

Unmute

0:59
/
0:59
Loaded: 0%

Progress: 0%

FullscreenFacebookTwitterShare

Trump used the language to describe the Syrian President after his alleged involvement in a toxic gas attack last month.

In a tweet the US leader condemned a “mindless chemical attack” in Syria that killed women and children, called Syrian President an “animal” and delivered a rare personal criticism of Russian President Vladimir Putin for supporting the Damascus government.

Explaining how he felt about Trump’s insult, Assad claimed he was not moved by Trump’s words, before then retaliating by returning the insult.

Russian broadcaster RT asked Assad if he also had a nickname for Trump, to which the Syrian president answered: “This is not my language, so, I cannot use similar language.

al assad, bashar assad, assad syria, syria,Trump, Donald Trump, US, strikes, Putin, Vladimir Putin, Russia, Iran, President Trump, animalGetty

Assad has branded President Donald Trump an “animal” as he hit back at the US leader

Donald J. Trump

@realDonaldTrump

Many dead, including women and children, in mindless CHEMICAL attack in Syria. Area of atrocity is in lockdown and encircled by Syrian Army, making it completely inaccessible to outside world. President Putin, Russia and Iran are responsible for backing Animal Assad. Big price…

“This is his language.

“It represents him.”

He added: ”I think there is a very known principle, that what you say is what you are.

“So, he wanted to represent what he is, and that’s normal.”

Assad also stated that Trump’s invention of an insulting nickname did not move him or Syria in the slightest.

He said: “It didn’t move anything and this language shouldn’t move anything for anyone.

“The only thing that moves you is what people that you trust, people who are level-headed, people who are thoughtful, people who are moral, ethical, that’s what should move anything inside you, whether positive or negative.

“Somebody like Trump will move nothing for me.”

Assad and Putin hold meeting on future peace talks

Play Video

al assad, bashar assad, assad syria, syria,Trump, Donald Trump, US, strikes, Putin, Vladimir Putin, Russia, Iran, President Trump, animalGetty

Trump’s tweet was followed by US led airstrikes against Syrian governments sites

Before he took office in January 2018, Donald Trump blamed former President Barack Obama for deciding not to respond to Assad’s use of chemical weapons.

Trump has also blamed his predecessor for supporting Syrian rebels trying to overthrow Assad after a 2011 uprising, saying in 2015 that “Assad may be bad, but we have absolutely no idea who these people are that we’re arming.”

Trump branded Obama “the founder of ISIS” and recently wrote on Twitter:

“If President Obama had crossed his stated Red Line In The Sand, the Syrian disaster would have ended long ago!

“Animal Assad would have been history!”

Humans Are Better At Noticing Snakes Than We Are At Seeing Spiders

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF POPULAR SCIENCE)

 

Humans Are Better At Noticing Snakes Than We Are At Seeing Spiders

Snake-grass

A snake in the grass.

Snakes get a bad rap, but we humans probably have them to thank — at least in part — for our superb vision.

A crafty serpent supposedly tempted Eve in the Garden of Eden, causing the ruination of humankind; today, ophidiophobia is one of the most common fears of animals. But these aversions are rooted in evolution. Snakes really are dangerous, and have been throughout the evolution of primates — so we’re primed to be on the lookout for them, according to something called Snake Detection Theory.

A new study published in December put this theory to the test, comparing humans’ snake detection capabilities with our spider-sensing capabilities. It turns out people are remarkably good at noticing snakes, even when it’s hard for us to focus attention — like when snakes are camouflaged or when we only get a brief glimpse of them.

To study this natural snake-seeing power, Portuguese and Swedish scientists went back to Charles Darwin, who in 1872 published a self-experiment on snake fear. He recounted how he stood in front of a window at a zoo and stared at a puff adder, a poisonous viper from western Africa, vowing to himself that he would not recoil when the snake tried to strike.

“As soon as the blow was struck, my resolution went for nothing, and I jumped a yard or two backwards with astonishing rapidity,” Darwin wrote. Snake fear is a natural reaction.

As the authors of this new study point out, more people die from snake bites every year than die from tropical diseases, including dengue fever, cholera, leishmaniasis, schistosomiasis, Japanese encephalitis, and Chagas’ disease. That’s according to a 2010 study in the Lancet. This equates to a significant evolutionary pressure, according to Snake Detection Theory. People who are good at noticing snakes would be less likely to be surprised and bitten, and more likely to survive to pass on their genes. So the need to detect serpents became a major driver of primate vision and even brain evolution, the theory goes.

But do snakes really take precedence over other “scary” animals? Psychological tests show that people are also sensitive to spiders, for instance, and rate them as “highly frightening.” They’re not as deadly as snakes, though — and they eat insects, not mammals. Still, the general human distaste for arachnids makes them a good comparison for snake sensing, according to study author Sandra Soares and colleagues.

They showed 205 volunteers a series of pictures, which contained images of snakes, spiders, mushrooms, flowers and fruits. The subjects had to press different button if the snakes or spiders were present or not. In a series of time trials, volunteers were more likely to notice the snakes than other targets, and they were more likely to accurately detect snakes than anything else, the researchers found.

The same was true when the researchers tested the volunteers’ peripheral vision: “Snakes were more efficiently detected than spiders and spiders were more efficiently detected than mushrooms,” the authors write. And when they tried to distract the viewers with other images, they were able to direct attention away from the spiders, but not the snakes.

In all, snakes got the most attention and got it the fastest, the authors say. That’s consistent with the basics of Snake Detection Theory.

“Our data provide new perspectives on the potentially unique role of snakes as agents likely to have shaped central aspects of primate evolution, including what has been regarded a hallmark of African apes, our superb vision,” the authors write.

The study is published in PLoS ONE.

Citation: Soares SC, Lindström B, Esteves F, Öhman A (2014) The Hidden Snake in the Grass: Superior Detection of Snakes in Challenging Attentional Conditions. PLoS ONE 9(12): e114724. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0114724.

Cattle And Puppy Mills: Miss Treatment, Both Are A Human Disgrace

Cattle And Puppy Mills: Miss Treatment, Both Are A Human Shame

 

Earlier this evening I was reading some post that folks had made about puppy mills. I personally have never seen a puppy mill though I have heard of them for many years now, but, there is something I want to enlighten some folks on about cruelty, (in my opinion) of other animals. What I am going to speak about tonight is on how some cattle are groomed for slaughter.
As most people who have ever been out of the cities during daylight hours would know we notice cattle grazing in the fields of the country side. Until I started driving a truck for a living I never thought anything different, but I have learned different. I had heard of places that raised cattle as if they were some kind of plant instead of a living creature but I had not seen such a thing with my own eyes until the company I was working for from 02-04 out of Knoxville TN who had a shipper in Chino California who had one of these, for lack of a better term, cow mills next door to the warehouse I loaded at. It was not uncommon with this shipper where you would have to wait 6 to 12 hours before your load would be ready so you occasionally walked about looking at the neighborhood. When you pulled into this shipper you would quickly notice the aroma of manure and urine in the air, turns out that on the adjacent property to the west was a beef producing company. This area not to long before was all farm land but now warehousing was scooping up the land. What I noticed next door was pathetic, there were young cattle who were boxed into very cramped stalls to where they could not turn or move at all, all they could do was stand there. These animals were fed constantly with all they needed to grow as quickly as possible. They got their food, water and steroids imputed as they stood over latrine ditches that they did their needs into. As soon as the company got each unit (cow) up to a certain weight they sent them out to be butchered. What a life, but, is that really a life? Everything in our financial world is totally about revenue, whether it is cattle, puppies or humans the person at the top end of the financial latter only cares about their profits. For good measure for the gross factor I’ll also let you know about the situations at the slaughter houses. I never hauled live cattle before but I have hauled a lot of free swing beef and boxed meat. About five or six times I was assigned to pickup loads of cow hides from the slaughter houses. Besides the stink of the venue and of the hides there was one other thing you couldn’t help but notice, the hides were still warm and steaming as they were being loaded onto your trailer, gross when you think about it.
For good measure I will let you in on one more thing about our American food supply. It was a bit of a surprise when I first saw items like cherries fresh from the field having the coloring bleached out and then being redyed with just the right red dye to make it where the American public would buy it because we Americans are so fickle, if things don’t look just a certain way, we wont buy it. Really, is it any wonder why Americans have so much weight on us and why we get such a high rate of diseases? The things you see when you make your living out on the road can be surprising and at times disturbing.

Snakes can actually hunt in packs

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF POPULAR SCIENCE)

Snakes can actually hunt in packs

But you should only be scared if you live in a cave in Cuba.

Cuban boa

Scary enough on its own.

The world is a scary place without knowing that snakes hunt in packs. But one biologist in Cuba just couldn’t leave well enough alone, so he proved for the first time ever that reptiles don’t just hunt near each other, they hunt with each other.

Snakes are not social creatures. They don’t live in packs like wolves or chatter to each other like prairie dogs. They join forces for just one thing: to kill. Snakes have long been known to hunt in groupings, it just wasn’t clear how coordinated these efforts were. It makes sense that they would all have a similar sense of where the best spot to hunt is, so many snakes gathering in one area doesn’t necessarily mean they’re coordinating. To prove that, you’d have to prove that the snakes were actually taking each other into account—that if boa #2 shows up and sees boa #1, he’s more likely to stick near that first snake, because being together helps them. And ideally, you would also prove that when snakes hunt together, they’re more successful.

Of course, to do that for the Cuban boa, you have to hang out in a cave all night watching snakes dangle from the ceiling eating bats. And that’s exactly what Vladimir Dinets, an assistant professor at University of Tennessee, decided to do. He published his results in the journal Animal Behavior and Cognition. Desembarco del Granma National Park in eastern Cuba has one cave in particular where Dinets set up shop. Nine boas lived inside, which he could apparently tell apart by their markings because he is a snake whisperer, and for eight consecutive days he watched them hunt. The boas would slither up the walls at sunset and just before dawn to catch bats, hanging upside down from the ceiling of the passage that connected the roosting chamber to the exit where their leathery prey would have to pass by.

Keep in mind that all this goes down in almost complete darkness. They’re in a national park with little light pollution, inside a cave, at fairly dark times of the day. Dinets sat in a dark cave filled with snakes and bats and calmly recorded each and every movement that the snakes made. He divided up the passage areas into sections, so he could later monitor how close the snakes were to each other, and noted every time a new snake joined the fray. And then each and every time a snake caught a bat, he recorded that too. Not just the fact that a snake caught a bat, but which snake caught a bat.

The boas themselves aren’t bothered by the dark because they hunt by touch. When bats brush against them, the snakes strike. Dinets wasn’t bothered because he seems to be some kind of superhuman.

Boas who hunted alone were in the very tiny minority, and it’s no wonder—they were much worse at catching bats. With three snakes present, each boa caught an average of one bat per snake and usually did it in under seven minutes (the boas left once they caught a bat, so the maximum batting average was one). If the snake was alone, that average dropped to 0.33 and it took them about 19 minutes to even get the bats they managed to get. Some lone boas actually gave up and went home. So when the boas entered the passage and encountered other snakes, they nearly always chose to set up camp alongside each other. Together they could form a kind of barrier, such that bats had a harder time avoiding the boas.

Unlike wolves, the boas didn’t otherwise hang out together. They’re solitary creatures. Wolves hunt together for primarily social reasons—multiple studies have shown that they don’t necessarily get more food by sticking with a pack. Snakes hunt together for the strategy. How cold-blooded of them.

Cattle And Puppy Mills: Miss Treatment, Both Are A Human Disgrace

Cattle And Puppy Mills: Miss Treatment, Both Are A Human Shame

 

Earlier this evening I was reading some post that folks had made about puppy mills. I personally have never seen a puppy mill though I have heard of them for many years now, but, there is something I want to enlighten some folks on about cruelty, (in my opinion) of other animals. What I am going to speak about tonight is on how some cattle are groomed for slaughter.
As most people who have ever been out of the cities during daylight hours would know we notice cattle grazing in the fields of the country side. Until I started driving a truck for a living I never thought anything different, but I have learned different. I had heard of places that raised cattle as if they were some kind of plant instead of a living creature but I had not seen such a thing with my own eyes until the company I was working for from 02-04 out of Knoxville TN who had a shipper in Chino California who had one of these, for lack of a better term, cow mills next door to the warehouse I loaded at. It was not uncommon with this shipper where you would have to wait 6 to 12 hours before your load would be ready so you occasionally walked about looking at the neighborhood. When you pulled into this shipper you would quickly notice the aroma of manure and urine in the air, turns out that on the adjacent property to the west was a beef producing company. This area not to long before was all farm land but now warehousing was scooping up the land. What I noticed next door was pathetic, there were young cattle who were boxed into very cramped stalls to where they could not turn or move at all, all they could do was stand there. These animals were fed constantly with all they needed to grow as quickly as possible. They got their food, water and steroids imputed as they stood over latrine ditches that they did their needs into. As soon as the company got each unit (cow) up to a certain weight they sent them out to be butchered. What a life, but, is that really a life? Everything in our financial world is totally about revenue, whether it is cattle, puppies or humans the person at the top end of the financial latter only cares about their profits. For good measure for the gross factor I’ll also let you know about the situations at the slaughter houses. I never hauled live cattle before but I have hauled a lot of free swing beef and boxed meat. About five or six times I was assigned to pickup loads of cow hides from the slaughter houses. Besides the stink of the venue and of the hides there was one other thing you couldn’t help but notice, the hides were still warm and steaming as they were being loaded onto your trailer, gross when you think about it.
For good measure I will let you in on one more thing about our American food supply. It was a bit of a surprise when I first saw items like cherries fresh from the field having the coloring bleached out and then being redyed with just the right red dye to make it where the American public would buy it because we Americans are so fickle, if things don’t look just a certain way, we wont buy it. Really, is it any wonder why Americans have so much weight on us and why we get such a high rate of diseases? The things you see when you make your living out on the road can be surprising and at times disturbing.

Penny Wilson Writes

A Bit of Me in Every Key Stroke

Short Prose

short prose, fiction, poetry

A Word Of Substance

"Object Relations"

Prospero's Island

Usurpation, murderous plots, a beautiful island...

AIWA! NO! Then press~~

Crimson Tazvinzwa: "We Read. We Discuss. We Review.."

blackornamental's Blog

The greatest WordPress.com site in all the land!

Further Approximation to Original Thought

An Experimental World View Blog

Un paso a la vez

Temas variados

%d bloggers like this: