More Than 1,000 Aftershocks Have Hit Alaska Since Fridays 7.0 Earthquake

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

More than 1,000 aftershocks of magnitude 1.5 or greater have shaken Alaska since Friday’s big quake knocked out power, ripped open roads and splintered buildings in Anchorage, US Geological Survey geophysicist Randy Baldwin said Sunday.

The majority were of a magnitude of 2.5 or weaker, meaning they weren’t likely felt. But more than 350 of the aftershocks were higher than 2.5, according to USGS data.
Still, local officials said life was returning to normal after Friday’s magnitude 7 earthquake, even as 4 to 8 inches of snow was expected Sunday.
alaska earthquake damage todd dnt tsr vpx_00002607

Scenes of chaos as 7.0 earthquake rocks Alaska
“This is the second-largest earthquake we’ve had since 1964, which was a very significant earthquake,” Anchorage Mayor Ethan Berkowitz told reporters Saturday, referring to the 9.2 quake that was the most powerful recorded in US history.
“In terms of a disaster, I think it says more about who we are than what we suffered,” Berkowitz said. “I would characterize this as a demonstration that Anchorage is prepared for these kind of emergencies.”

Alaskans resilient to damage

No fatalities or serious injuries were reported, officials said. In Alaska’s largest city — with a population of about 300,000 — airports, hospitals, emergency services and most businesses were operating.
“The power is up. The heat is on. The communication lines are opening,” said Anchorage Municipal Manager Bill Falsey.
Most of the aftershocks have not rattled Alaskans. But 12 as of Sunday morning more powerful than 4.5 struck near Anchorage and Big Lake, the USGS says.
Footage shows destruction in TV station

Footage shows destruction in TV station
A 5.2 aftershock about 11 p.m. Friday was the second-biggest since a 5.7 temblor hit minutes after the main quake, said Gavin Hayes, a research geophysicist with the USGS.
“That would have given people a shake and probably a bit of a scare given what they went through yesterday,” he told CNN.
The 7.0 earthquake sent residents scurrying for cover when it hit about 8:30 a.m. Friday. The quake was centered 10 miles northeast of Anchorage.
“The most striking thing about this event was that it was so close to Anchorage,” Hayes said. “That’s why it has caused the damage that we’re seeing.”
The earthquake was not unusual for the region and probably wouldn’t have received much attention had it not struck so close to town, he said.

‘This was a big one’

Roads buckled under passing cars and products tumbled from shelves. In court, panicked attorneys scurried under tables as a room rocked from side to side.
“It was very loud when it came,” Berkowitz said Friday. “It was very clear that this was something bigger than what we normally experience. We live in earthquake country … but this was a big one.”
Palmer resident Kristin Dossett described the initial jolt as “absolutely terrifying.”
It was the biggest quake she has felt in her 37 years in a region where temblors are common, Dossett said. One aftershock moved her piano a foot and half from the wall.
An employee walks past a damaged aisle in an Anchorage store after the earthquake.

“It just didn’t stop. It kept going and got louder and louder, and things just fell everywhere — everything off my dressers, off my bookcases, my kitchen cupboard. Just broken glass everywhere.”
Philip Peterson was in a multistory building in downtown Anchorage as the structure swayed and coffee mugs fell from tables and tiles from the ceiling.
“I just jumped under my desk and had to ride it out,” Peterson said.
Authorities don’t have firm figures on damage yet, though the Anchorage Police Department reported “major infrastructure damage” around the city. Helicopters and drones were assessing infrastructure across the region. There were no reports of missing people, authorities saidala.
People walk along a road in Wasilla after Friday's earthquake.

Alaska Regional Hospital and Providence Alaska Medical Center suffered damage but were able to keep emergency rooms open.
The Anchorage School District canceled classes Monday and Tuesday to assess damage.
Gov. Bill Walker has issued a disaster declaration.
The 7.0 earthquake was felt up to 400 miles away, said state seismologist Michael West. He called it the most significant earthquake in Anchorage since 1964.

Massive Earthquake Hits Alaska, But Tsunami Risk Subsides

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HUFFINGTON POST)

 

Massive Earthquake Hits Alaska, But Tsunami Risk Subsides

The 7.0 magnitude quake struck just 10 miles from Anchorage, a city of 300,000 people.
X

Residents of Anchorage, Alaska, are assessing the damage from a massive earthquake that struck Friday morning and are breathing a sigh of relief after officials canceled tsunami warnings.

Measured as a magnitude 7.0 quake by the U.S. Geological Survey, the quake hit at 8:29 a.m. local time, with the epicenter just 10 miles from the city of nearly 300,000 residents. Residents of Fairbanks, a city of about 30,000 more than 350 miles away, reported feeling shaking there too.

Though officials have yet to release any estimates of damage, injuries or fatalities, people have begun to share photos and videos of destruction on social media. An image from the KTVA newsroom, the CBS affiliate station in Anchorage, shows collapsed tables and computers and TVs dangling from their mounts. All local TV stations were reportedly knocked off the air.

Cassie Schirm@cassieschirmtv

KTVA’s newsroom felt the blow of the earthquake this morning.

2,990 people are talking about this

Other shocking photos and videos show collapsed roads with cars stranded on them, including these near the Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport:

Anchorage Daily News

@adndotcom

The northbound onramp for International Airport Rd. at Minnesota Blvd. collapsed Friday morning during the earthquake. https://on.adn.com/2E6Dd27 

211 people are talking about this

Embedded video

sarah m@sarahh_mars

7.2 earthquake here in Anchorage, Alaska. This is a video my dad took from the Minnesota exit ramp from international. 😰😰

6,139 people are talking about this

Officials canceled a tsunami warning posted for the Cook Inlet and southern Kenai Peninsula near Anchorage. The National Weather Service had warned residents in Kodiak and Seward that tsunami activity could start just an hour after the earthquake struck.

A 7.0 quake can be highly dangerous. The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake in San Francisco was measured at magnitude 6.9 and killed 63 people, and the 1994 magnitude 6.7 Northridge earthquake in Southern California killed 57 ― though both quakes struck areas more populous than Anchorage.

A National Weather Service employee on duty in Anchorage during the temblor called it “the scariest earthquake I have ever been in.”

The Oz@PV_Anomaly

That was the scariest earthquake I have ever been in. Lead on shift…we evacuated the NWS Anchorage building.

82 people are talking about this

Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin released a statement that her “family is intact” but her “house is not.”

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

Anchorage Alaska: 9 Murders: No Answers Yet

(This article is courtesy of the Seattle PI News and the Associated Press)

Rash of unsolved homicides puts people on edge in Anchorage

Updated 12:32 am, Saturday, September 3, 2016

ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A rash of unsolved outdoor homicides in Alaska’s largest city is putting residents on edge.

Altogether, the deaths of nine people who were killed on Anchorage trails, parks and isolated streets since January remain unsolved — among them three cases involving two victims each.

“It’s terrifying,” said Jennifer Hazen, a longtime resident who lives near Valley of the Moon Park, where two people were found dead early Sunday, one of them on a park bike trail. Hazen walks in the park regularly, and finds some comfort in knowing the unsolved homicides occurred in the middle of the night when she wouldn’t be out there anyway.

“I’m just really shocked about all this happening,” said another resident, Yegor Christman as he walked his dog on the bike trail. “I thought I lived in a pretty safe area.”

Adding to the feeling of vulnerability, Anchorage has had 25 homicides this year. That’s the same number the city had for the entire year in 2015. Even though the number is high, police point out that 1995, with 29 homicides, had the highest numbers in the last two decades.

With 15 homicides since late June, police issued an unusual public advisory this week urging residents to be “extra aware” of their surroundings, noting that crimes often increase at night and early in the morning.

“APD wants to remind our citizens to be cautious when they are out during these hours, especially if they are in isolated areas like our parks, bike trails or unoccupied streets,” the police department wrote. “If you plan to be out late at night, make sure you travel with several friends and not alone.”

Police Chief Chris Tolley downplayed the significance of the advisory, saying police often remind the public to be safe, sometimes through a text messaging system. Earlier this year, police issued a similar safety alert after a series of car break-ins and thefts, Tolley said. The goal was the same in this week’s advisory, to inform the public.

“This is no different,” he said. “We want our public to be proactive. So this is really a plea to them in their personal safety.”

Three of the victims were found alone. Two of those victims had been shot, according to police, who will not say how the other seven died. They won’t say what details have been shared with the families of the victims. Relatives could not immediately be reached for comment Friday.

Police have released few details on any of the cases, saying investigators haven’t made any clear connections between the victims. Asked if police believe a serial killer could be on the loose, police spokeswoman Jennifer Castro said police always try to determine if unsolved crimes are related.

The only common denominators found among the victims are that the deaths occurred outdoors, in the early hours and in isolated places such as trails and unoccupied streets.

John McCleary is a longtime volunteer with the city’s Trail Watch program, which was started in 2006 after a string of assaults, mostly against women, on local trails. Trail Watch volunteers serve two purposes, to be the eyes for the police department, reporting any problems, and to create safer conditions on 300 miles of trails with such efforts as cutting down vegetation.

But McCleary, the former director of the program for the city, said he’s never seen a situation with so many unsolved killings — and he’s been connected with city trails since the late 1970’s. He says he feels angry and frustrated that people can’t enjoy the trails like they could a decade ago.

“This is … so abnormal,” he said. “It doesn’t seem like I’m in the same city.”

Randall Alcala walks almost daily along the downtown Ship Creek Trail, where two homicide victims were found dead in July. But those deaths, even though unsolved, don’t make him feel unsafe.

He just saw a black bear on the trail about a week ago, and is more leery of run-ins with one of the city’s hundreds of bears.

___

Diana Qeblawi

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