Nigeria’s Basic Education System Is Failing Their Citizens And Businesses

(This article is courtesy of the Abuja Nigeria Inquirer News Paper)

Despite concerted efforts towards improving primary and secondary education in the country, the newly appointed Executive Secretary of Universal Basic Education Commission, UBEC, Dr. Hameed Bobboyi, has said basic education has suffered serious neglect.
Bobboyi, who spoke in Abuja while assuming duty, called on relevant stakeholders to play an active role towards revamping the sub-sector as there is no alternative to fixing the nation’s basic education.
In a statement by the Public Relations Officer of the Commission, Mrs. Helen Okoro, the UBEC boss, noted that for the country to achieve the needed quality education and production of critical mass of manpower to drive Government’s development agenda, the foundation of basic education must first be established.
He acknowledged that there were multiple challenges confronting basic education sector in Nigeria but expressed confidence that with all relevant stakeholders working together, the much desired quality basic education would be achieved.
“We cannot get it right without properly laying a solid foundation for the growth and development of basic education. Yes, basic education is on the concurrent list, we all need to work collectively to revamp the sector.
“I understand that the Federal government has done a lot through UBEC. We will sustain that and we will also meet with the state governments and relevant stakeholders in this regard,” he said.
Bobboyi pledged to give priority attention to the welfare of staff of the Commission while also urging them to continue to discharge their duties with utmost level of patriotism, honesty and hard work.
Also speaking, the former Executive Secretary of UBEC, Dr. Suleiman Dikko, said the inability of some state governments to pay in matching grants to access UBEC allocations for the development of basic education in their domains, was a major challenge to the Commission. – See more at: http://www.theabujainquirer.com/?page=1597&get=1597#sthash.ZxWiKdZK.dpuf

Nigeria’s Basic Education System Is Failing Their Citizens And Businesses

(This article is courtesy of the Abuja Nigeria Inquirer News Paper)

Despite concerted efforts towards improving primary and secondary education in the country, the newly appointed Executive Secretary of Universal Basic Education Commission, UBEC, Dr. Hameed Bobboyi, has said basic education has suffered serious neglect.
Bobboyi, who spoke in Abuja while assuming duty, called on relevant stakeholders to play an active role towards revamping the sub-sector as there is no alternative to fixing the nation’s basic education.
In a statement by the Public Relations Officer of the Commission, Mrs. Helen Okoro, the UBEC boss, noted that for the country to achieve the needed quality education and production of critical mass of manpower to drive Government’s development agenda, the foundation of basic education must first be established.
He acknowledged that there were multiple challenges confronting basic education sector in Nigeria but expressed confidence that with all relevant stakeholders working together, the much desired quality basic education would be achieved.
“We cannot get it right without properly laying a solid foundation for the growth and development of basic education. Yes, basic education is on the concurrent list, we all need to work collectively to revamp the sector.
“I understand that the Federal government has done a lot through UBEC. We will sustain that and we will also meet with the state governments and relevant stakeholders in this regard,” he said.
Bobboyi pledged to give priority attention to the welfare of staff of the Commission while also urging them to continue to discharge their duties with utmost level of patriotism, honesty and hard work.
Also speaking, the former Executive Secretary of UBEC, Dr. Suleiman Dikko, said the inability of some state governments to pay in matching grants to access UBEC allocations for the development of basic education in their domains, was a major challenge to the Commission. – See more at: http://www.theabujainquirer.com/?page=1597&get=1597#sthash.ZxWiKdZK.dpuf

Abuja Nigeria To Host ‘Proudly Nigeria Expo’ September 5-11

(This article is courtesy of the Abuja Nigeria Inquirer News Paper)

The Federal Capital Territory is to play host to the maiden edition of the Proudly Nigeria Expo aimed at patronizing made in Nigeria goods and services.
The seven-day event slated to hold from 5-11 September, 2016 is to showcase the potential and opportunities that exist in Nigeria, training on start-ups and small businesses generally.
Addressing journalists as part of activities to mark the event, the convener, Mrs. Jumai Ahmadu, called for sustained advocacy to tame the appetite of most Nigerians for foreign goods, stressing that buying Nigeria goods stimulate the local economy given that all economic growth starts at the community level.
“Patronizing local goods helps the farmer, trader, artisan to stay in business. Why should people buy imported eggs when the nutritional value is not different from eggs produced locally? Why should scarce forex be used for goods that can be produced locally and drive our economy for imported ones?
“Being Proudly Nigeria guarantees job security. If we do not patronize our own goods and services, how do we ensure people stay employed and those looking for jobs are employed”? She queried.
Ahmadu also queried the issue of local content by foreign companies in Nigeria, noting that it is inconceivable that they bring staff from their own country, when Nigerians can as well render these services.
According to her, “For Proudly Nigeria, it is not just a one-off expo but an advocacy, a continuous messaging that Nigerians should buy made in Nigeria goods, patronize local services and get government to ensure that the local content quota is adhered to by foreign companies doing business in Nigeria.
“It is curious to find individuals and businesses that would not even employ a Nigerian nanny or driver rather employ people from other African countries. In the building sector, it is even worst as some builders would not recruit Nigerian masons, tillers and other artisans in that sector, rather will use artisans from somewhere else. Most often than not, those who do this act on the base assumptions that Nigerians in those trade are not good enough. Experience brings perfection!” – See more at: http://www.theabujainquirer.com/?page=1587&get=1587#sthash.B4kEJP1w.dpuf