(A Savage Comment) Do You See No Elections This Fall: Trump Just Stays In Power?

 Do You See No Elections This Fall: Trump Just Stays In Power?

 

This letter this evening is about a ‘what if’. What if President Trump used some kind of war powers act and declaired there will be no new elections until He decides it to be so? What if? President Donald trump for another 4 years without an elections? President Donald Trump for life? Ivanka Trump our next Vice President, thus, next President after her “Daddy”? Dynasty of Trumps? All I am saying is what if! If these type events were to happen, what then? Would the people revolt? As a dear old friend used to say,”we shall see what we shall see”!

Pelosi warns: ‘Civilization as we know it today is at stake’ in 2020 election

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

Pelosi warns: ‘Civilization as we know it today is at stake’ in 2020 election

Washington (CNN)House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said on Thursday that “civilization as we know it today is at stake” in the 2020 presidential election, saying that she does not want to “contemplate” the possibility that President Donald Trump could be elected to serve as second term in office.

“Let’s not even contemplate that,” Pelosi said at a CNN town hall Thursday evening in response to an audience question about what checks will exist in the House of Representatives if Trump is reelected and the impeachment process is over.
“Civilization as we know it today is at stake in the next election, and certainly our planet,” Pelosi said.
Pelosi’s participation at the town hall event came on the same day that she announced that the House will take the momentous step of moving forward with articles of impeachment against Trump. That announcement adds a new level of intensity to the impeachment effort and likely paves the way for Trump to become the third President in US history to be impeached.
Pelosi called her decision “quite historic” during a CNN town hall moderated by Jake Tapper.
In response to an audience question, she said, “I have to admit that today was quite historic. It was taking us, crossing a threshold on this that we just had no choice. I do hope that it would be remembered in a way that honors the vision of our founders, what they had in mind for establishing a democracy.”

‘I’m not on a timetable, I’m on a mission’

Pelosi, who is guiding House Democratic caucus through the impeachment process as the top Democrat in the chamber, sidestepped a question whether she would step aside if a Democrat wins the White House in 2020.
“I’m not on a timetable, I’m on a mission,” Pelosi said, an answer that met with applause from the audience.
As House Democrats grapple now with how to draft articles of impeachment, Pelosi said during the town hall that Democrats are working “collectively” on determining what will be included in the articles.
Asked by Tapper whether she would proceed if Judiciary Chairman Jerry Nadler recommends including obstruction of justice charges from special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, Pelosi said, “We’re operating collectively. It’s not going to be — somebody puts something on the table. We have our own, shall we say, communication with each other.”
Pelosi declined to go further. “We’re not writing the articles of impeachment here tonight.”
Articles have not been finalized, but Democrats are now signaling that the articles of impeachment could go beyond the scope of the Ukraine investigation that has dominated Washington for the past two months.
Whether to include Mueller’s findings of obstruction of justice has been debated internally for weeks as some moderate Democrats only got behind an impeachment inquiry because it was narrowly focused on Ukraine.
Pelosi took aim at Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani during the town hall when asked about his continued efforts in Ukraine as Democrats move forward with their impeachment inquiry.
“I’m a busy person,” Pelosi said, “I don’t have time to keep track of Rudy Giuliani, I just don’t, but I do think that it is further indication of the arrogance of it all.”

‘Disgusting’ question over hate

During the town hall, Pelosi also explained why she had reacted so strongly to a reporter who asked her if she hates President Donald Trump, calling the question “really disgusting.”
Asked by Tapper during a CNN town hall about her reaction during her weekly press conference to the question, Pelosi cited her Catholic upbringing and responded, “The word hate is a terrible word … so for him to say that was really disgusting to me.”
The California Democrat added, “I’d rather like to think that America is a country that is full of love, whatever we think about what somebody else might believe that might be different from us, that that isn’t a reason to dislike somebody. It’s a reason to disagree with somebody.”
Pelosi issued a stark warning to the reporter from Sinclair who had asked her the question, responding forcefully, “Don’t mess with me” — a sign of the tension amid the House of Representatives’ impeachment push.
During CNN’s town hall, Pelosi questioned whether the person who asked the question is actually a reporter, saying, “Was that a reporter? Is that what reporters do?” when Tapper asked about the exchange.

‘I don’t think we’re headed for a shutdown’

Pelosi also predicted during Thursday’s town hall that there will not be a government shutdown later this month.
“I don’t think we’re headed for a shutdown. I don’t think anybody wants that,” Pelosi said.
“We’re on a good path, if we were not, we would just go to a continuing resolution until after Christmas,” Pelosi said, referring to a stop-gap measure to keep funding in place.
Lawmakers will need to take action to avert a government shutdown before the end of the month, making the month even busier in Congress as the impeachment inquiry dominates headlines in Washington.
The President’s contacts with Ukraine are at the heart of the impeachment inquiry and investigators have focused on probing the now-famous July 25 phone call where Trump asked the President of Ukraine for a “favor” and pushed for investigations into the family of a potential political rival, former Vice President and Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden.
The President has argued that the call was “perfect,” and congressional Republicans have defended the President and his administration, saying that Trump did not commit an impeachable offense.
This story has been updated with additional developments Thursday.

New York Times and Washington Post declare Kamala Harris doomed

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON EXAMINER)

 

‘Flailing … teetering’: New York Times and Washington Post declare Kamala Harris doomed

Both the New York Times and Washington Post published stories arguing that Sen. Kamala Harris’s presidential campaign is on uneasy footing and nearing a collapse.

Harris, despite declaring her candidacy in front of over 20,000 people in January, has experienced a significant dip in the polls in recent months in part because voters still have questions about who she is and what she supports.

The Post reported, “As a result, her candidacy is now teetering, weighed down by indecision within her campaign, her limits as a candidate and dwindling funds that have forced her to retreat in some places at a moment she expected to be surging,” and labled her campaign “flailing.”

The Harris campaign recently laid off staffers to the ire of those left in the offices. Campaign manager Juan Rodriguez was pelted by questions from other members of the campaign following those layoffs earlier this month. Kelly Mehlenbacher, the Iowa operations director, roasted Rodriguez and Harris’s sister Maya, who’s also the campaign chairwoman, in her resignation letter. She has since joined the Bloomberg campaign.

The Times obtained Mehlenbacher’s resignation letter, in which she claimed, “This is my third presidential campaign and I have never seen an organization treat its staff so poorly,” and added that, “With less than 90 days until Iowa we still do not have a real plan to win.”

They also reported that factions have been created within the Harris campaign and that she is no longer on good terms with Rodriguez. Rep. Marcia Fudge, who has endorsed Harris and is a former chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus, argued that while Harris is not absolved of responsibility, she needs to get rid of Rodriguez in order to regain her footing in the primary.

Legal Marijuana: This Is Where All 2020 Presidential Politicians Stand On This Issue

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NEWSWEEK)

 

With an ever-growing field of contenders running for president, especially in the Democratic Party, once-fringe measures like marijuana legalization have become a litmus test for the candidates’ commitment to progressive politics.

“It’s very encouraging to see so many presidential candidates taking a position in line with what the American people want. For decades there’s been a disconnect between the positions of the American public and their elected officials,” Matthew Schweich, the deputy director of the Marijuana Policy Project, told Newsweek.

National polling shows that the country overwhelmingly supports legalizing marijuana for both medical and recreational use. According to a 2018 Gallup poll, two in every three Americans support legalizing weed. That figure was backed up by a CBS poll conducted on the eve of 4/20, a date has long been a national holiday for those inclined to celebrate cannabis culture even before the rush of states legalizing marijuana in recent years.

Ten states and Washington D.C. have already legalized marijuana and over 30 states have medical marijuana laws. During the 2018 midterm elections, three states voted in favor of marijuana legalization including Michigan, which was the first Midwest state to do so.

Schweich said that it is “clear that these policies work and that has helped bring presidential candidates to the position of support.” In return, 2020 candidates who support cannabis reform are helping to further normalize the issue.

Here’s where all of the 2020 presidential candidates stand on marijuana:

Cory Booker (D)

Senator Booker has supported cannabis reform efforts in Congress and has been an outspoken critic of the war on drugs.

In February, Booker reintroduced the Marijuana Justice Act, which he first introduced in 2017. The legislation would decriminalize marijuana at the federal level. Several other 2020 Democratic candidates have co-sponsored the bill, including Harris, Gillibrand, Sanders and Warren.

Pete Buttigieg (D)

The South Bend, Indiana, mayor doesn’t appear to have signed any legislation regarding marijuana reform but he has stated he supports legalization. In an interview with The Boston Globe, Buttigieg said that the “safe, regulated, and legal sale of marijuana is an idea whose time has come for the United States, as evidenced by voters demanding legalization in states across the country.”

Julian Castro (D)

The former Housing secretary does not have a large record on marijuana policy, but he stated his favor for legalization at a CNN town hall earlier this month.

“I actually support the legalization of marijuana,” he said. “On top of that, we need to go back and expunge the records of people who were imprisoned because of using marijuana.”

John Delaney (D)

The former House representative has suggested support for legalization and said that the federal government should get out of the way.

“There’s such a movement at the state level to legalize marijuana, to decriminalize it, and at a minimum to allow it to be legal for medical purposes,” Delaney said at a town hall event at SXSW. “And I think the federal government should get out of the way and let that movement continue.”

Tulsi Gabbard (D)

The congresswoman from Hawaii supports the legalization of marijuana. During her time in Washington D.C. she’s co-sponsored various marijuana-related bills. She was also the prime sponsor of a proposal to force the federal government to study the impact of legalizing cannabis.

In her campaign speech, Gabbard slammed the criminal justice system for putting “people in prison for smoking marijuana while allowing corporations like Purdue Pharma, who are responsible for the opioid-related deaths of thousands of people, to walk away scot-free with their coffers full.”

Kirsten Gillibrand (D)

The New York Democrat is now one of the most vocal lawmakers in Congress for cannabis reform, despite not co-sponsoring any pro-marijuana bills during her time in the House of Representatives from 2007 to 2009.

On her 2020 campaign website, Gillibrand highlights her support for marijuana legalization, writing: “We have a mass incarceration crisis, and institutional racism pervades the way we enforce laws. To rectify this, we should legalize marijuana at the federal level and expunge past records; reform our sentencing laws so that judges can have more flexibility when dealing with low-level, nonviolent drug offenses.”

Kamala Harris (D)

Harris’s thoughts on marijuana reform have evolved. In 2010, when she was the attorney general of California, she opposed an initiative to legalize marijuana. But in 2018, Harris added her name to Booker’s Marijuana Justice Act​ to make marijuana legal at the federal level​.

In a recent radio interview, Harris said that she has smoked marijuana before: “I have. And I inhaled, I did inhale. It was a long time ago, but yes.”

John Hickenlooper (D)

Hickenlooper oversaw Colorado’s marijuana reform effort in 2012, though he deemed the decision to legalize the drug “reckless.” Since then, he’s signed a number of various marijuana-related bills into law.

During a CNN town hall event in March, Hickenlooper said that he “would not ask the federal government to legalize it for everyone, but I think where states do legalize marijuana, with the voters or through the general assembly, the federal government should get out of the way.”

Jay Inslee (D)

Inslee, the governor of Washington, oversaw the state’s legalization efforts. He also launched a program designed to expedite the expungements of misdemeanor marijuana possession convictions going back to 1998.

Before launching a 2020 bid, Inslee said that he expects recreational use of marijuana to eventually be legalized in all states.

Jay Inslee

@JayInslee

Proud to get the top grade on cannabis policy from @NORML. It’s time to legalize marijuana nationally. https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomangell/2019/01/16/legal-marijuana-advocates-rank-the-best-and-worst-governors-on-cannabis/#4789a3ed78b3 

Legal Marijuana Advocates Rank The Best And Worst Governors On Cannabis

NORML gave each of the nation’s 50 state governors a grade on cannabis policy. More got A grades than ever before, reflecting how marijuana is now mainstream in American politics.

forbes.com

207 people are talking about this

Amy Klobuchar (D)

The Minnesota senator said that she is in support of legalizing marijuana. “I support the legalization of marijuana and believe that states should have the right to determine the best approach to marijuana within their borders,” she said in February.

Klobuchar is a co-sponsor of the STATES Act, which would protect states’ rights to enact their own marijuana policies. She has also signed onto measures to expand marijuana research and to remove CBD from the federal law’s definition of marijuana.

2020, candidates, legal, marijuana, legalization, weedAdvocates for the legalization of marijuana gather in front of the White House during a demonstration by dozens who were protesting current laws April 2, 2016 in Washington, D.C. MIKE THEILER/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Wayne Messam (D)

The 44-year-old mayor of Miramar, Florida, said he believes states should have the right to legalize marijuana without threats from the federal government.

“As long as those states that choose to do so continue to enforce DUI laws, spread economic benefits throughout all communities, and expunge records for those arrested for selling marijuana, they would have my full support as President,” his campaign website reads.

Beto O’Rourke (D)

The Texas Democrat is in favor of ending federal prohibition of marijuana and creating a regulated, legal marijuana market. He also supports expunging the criminal records of people who were arrested for non-violent marijuana crimes. While in Congress he cosponsored a number of drug reform bills.

In March, just before launching his presidential campaign, O’Rourke sent an email to supporters in which he again backed the repeal of the federal criminalization of marijuana.

Bernie Sanders (D)

The Vermont senator was the first major presidential candidate to endorse marijuana legalization during his first presidential bid. He was a more vocal supporter of cannabis reform than his primary rival Hillary Clinton.

In 2015, Sanders filed the first-ever Senate bill to end federal cannabis prohibition. In March, Sanders said that “too many lives are being destroyed” federal laws banning marijuana use.

Eric Swalwell (D)

The California lawmaker supports marijuana legalization. He backed the SAFE Banking Act, which would allow legal marijuana businesses to access banking services. He’s also a co-sponsor for the Ending Federal Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2019.

Elizabeth Warren (D)

Warren is a sponsor of the STATES Act, which she filed alongside Colorado Senator Cory Gardner. She said that, while she would prefer to legalize the drug completely, she is willing to work with Republicans to support state-lead legalizations efforts.

At a campaign stop in New Hampshire, a reporter asked the senator how she currently felt about cannabis reform. Warren replied that she “voted in favor of legalizing marijuana in Massachusetts” and that “we should legalize it nationally.”

Marianne Williamson (D)

Williamson is in support of legalizing marijuana. During a campaign stop in New Hampshire this week, she said that in her “opinion is we are so beyond worrying about marijuana. We are onto something so much bigger than marijuana”—like the problems people face with drugs like heroin and fentanyl.

Andrew Yang (D)

The 44-year-old technology executive states on his campaign website that he in support of full-scale legalization of marijuana.

“We need to resolve the ambiguity and legalize marijuana at the federal level. This would improve safety, social equity, and generate tens of billions of dollars in new revenue based on legal cannabis businesses,” the website reads.

Bill Weld (R)

Despite being a longtime Republican, Weld has supported marijuana legalization since serving as the governor of Massachusetts in the early 1990s. In 2018, Weld joined the board of a cannabis company with former House Speaker John Boehner, who had once famously said in that he was “unalterably opposed” to decriminalizing the drug.

He has also endorsed the STATES Act, calling the bill his “favorite piece of legislation that is on the Hill right now.”

Donald Trump (R)

During the 2016 campaign, then-candidate Trump said that he supported medical marijuana but that any other policies should be left up to the states to decide. Then in June 2017, just a few months after being sworn in, Trump said that he would probably “end up supporting” the bipartisan STATES Act.