Tropical Storm Nestor Spawns Tornadoes In Florida

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NBC NEWS)

 

Image:
A camper rests on top of a boat trailer and the corner of a home as Tropical Storm Nestor passed the area on Saturday in Kathleen, Florida. Nestor was downgraded Saturday after it spawned a tornado that damaged several homes.Luis Santana / AP

The tornadoes caused power outages for thousands of customers across central Florida.

“Hurricanes have seen damage, but never have I seen a tornado do something as bad as this,” a resident told NBC News affiliate Telemundo 49 in Tampa.

Officials warned residents of 6- to 8-feet surf and rip currents along Florida’s Gulf Coast.

“As #Nestor moves north, storms associated with this system are still producing dangerous beach conditions across the Gulf Coast, and in areas of the Atlantic Coast,” the Florida Division of Emergency Management tweeted. “Pay attention to beach warning flags and do not swim in dangerous conditions.”

The storm could get a slight second wind Sunday when some strengthening is expected, the weather service said.

When it was still a tropical storm Friday night, Nestor bore down on the northern Gulf Coast with high winds, surging seas and heavy rains. At one point, it had threatened to hit an area of the Panhandle devastated one year ago by Hurricane Michael.

Why Are Seasons Reversed in the Southern Hemisphere?

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

Why Are Seasons Reversed in the Southern Hemisphere?

Have you ever talked on the phone with a friend who lives in the opposite hemisphere? It can be an eye-opening experience, particularly when they start complaining about the weather. While they’re experiencing icy winters and cold, bitter winds, you’re sweating it out in your t-shirt and shorts, trying to beat the summer heat.

But why do the northern and southern hemispheres have opposite seasons? To answer that, we should first take a step back and look at what causes seasonal weather shifts in the first place.

DAILY QUESTIONpin icon
Test your knowledge!
Where is this world-famous peak?

PLAY NOWpin icon

A Primer on Seasons

Credit: BrianAJackson / iStockPhoto

We’d explain the concept of seasons, but why not let National Geographic do it instead?

A season is a period of the year that is distinguished by special climate conditions. The four seasons — spring, summer, fall, and winter — follow one another regularly. Each has its own light, temperature, and weather patterns that repeat yearly.”

Of course, the classic four season framework applies only to regions at mid-latitudes between the equator and the poles. Seasons are largely dependent on the region’s location relative to the equator, and as you travel closer to or further from the equator, this pattern begins to shift.

Closer to the poles, temperatures are generally colder with fewer hours of daylight. (In Barrow, Alaska, it’s consistently dark throughout most of the winter — close to three months!) But nearer to the equator, it’s warm for most of the year, and daylight cycles stay consistent.

In other words, seasonal shifts are determined by two things:

  1. The region’s location on the globe
  2. The axis of the earth relative to the sun.

That first point is a factor in explaining how extreme seasonal weather shifts can be. But when explaining why seasons are opposite across northern and southern hemispheres, the axis makes all the difference.

The Axis of the Earth Is Key

Credit: sundown001 / iStockPhoto

Our earth has a tilted axis relative to the position of the sun, which is why seasons are opposite across hemispheres.

The Extremes: Summer and Winter

Credit: SUNG YOON JO / iStockPhoto

When Earth’s axis is tilted such that the northern hemisphere leans towards the sun, those regions receive more solar energy, and thus, feel hotter. At the same time, the southern hemisphere receives very little solar energy, producing cold weather. Six months later, the opposite occurs—the other hemisphere tilts towards the sun, and the cycle continues.

The Middle Ground: Autumn and Spring

Credit: SrdjanPav / iStockPhoto

So, winter and summer are opposite. But what about autumn and spring?

These are even easier to understand. Since Earth’s axis produces a tilt that creates opposite seasons across the equator, there’s a sort of “middle ground” that occurs as Earth spins towards its summer/winter extremes. This middle ground is, essentially, the autumn and spring seasons.

Seasons Aren’t so Different

Credit: LeManna / iStockPhoto

During these mild seasons, both hemispheres receive the same amount of solar radiation, producing similar weather conditions across the north and south. The key difference comes from each region’s starting point.

When a region moves into autumn, it’s moving from a period of high solar energy (summer) into a lower period. And conversely, regions moving from winter to spring slowly gain solar energy. In this way, autumn and spring are functionally the same thing. The only difference is where each region begins.

India: Schools shut in Mumbai after alert of extremely heavy rainfall today

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HINDUSTAN TIMES OF INDIA)

 

Schools shut in Mumbai after alert of extremely heavy rainfall today

The Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) forecasted heavy rainfall and has issued a red rain alert for Mumbai and Raigad districts. This indicates a precipitation of more than 204 mm in 24 hours starting Thursday morning.

INDIA Updated: Sep 19, 2019 11:54 IST

HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent

Hindustan Times, Mumbai
A car stuck in Rain Water under Sanpada Subway during Heavy Rains in Navi Mumbai, India, on Tuesday, September 17, 2019.
A car stuck in Rain Water under Sanpada Subway during Heavy Rains in Navi Mumbai, India, on Tuesday, September 17, 2019. (Bachchan Kumar/ Hindustan Times)

Mumbai city and the adjoining areas are likely to witness “extremely heavy rainfall” on Thursday, said an IMD official.

The Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) forecasted heavy rainfall and has issued a red rain alert for Mumbai and Raigad districts. This indicates a precipitation of more than 204 mm in 24 hours starting Thursday morning.

However, Mumbai would receive heavy rainfall on Friday, but Raigad will continue to receive extremely heavy showers that day also, the official said.

Education minister Ashish Shelar has announced that all schools and junior colleges in Thane, Konkan and Mumbai region will remain shut as the weather department forecast a red alert in these regions. He also asked district collectors to keep an eye on the developments.

ashish shelar

@ShelarAshish

In view of heavy rainfall forecasts. As a precautionary measure, holiday is declared for all schools & junior colleges in Mumbai, Thane, Konkan region for today 19 Sep 2019. District collectors in other parts of Maharashtra to decide, based on local conditions.

1,029 people are talking about this

This monsoon continued to sweep away records after the city reported its wettest September ever on Wednesday, breaking a 65-year-old record. With another 12 days to go till the end of the month, Mumbai has received 984.3mm rain from September 1 to September 18.

First Published: Sep 19, 2019 07:06 IST

(Love Poem) High Winds

HIGH WINDS

 

Not tired so I decided to stay up a while tonight

No particular reason, just that I wished to tonight

About one A.M. I start to hear the high winds roll

Down the Pass straight to our home they blow

The house creaks and cracks to say it’s hello

 

Wife sound a sleep at the back-end of the house we share

Winds always bother her, she has lived in the alley of big blows

My lady had snoozed so I ushered her to bed about midnight

A big blow once picked up her car with her and her baby inside

It sat them back down on the highway, still unhurt and alive

 

Sweet dreams to my Lady, sleeping quietly tonight

Wrapped up with her Boo kitty all snuggled in tight

About five A.M. now, it think the big winds have died

Big winds can be so soothing, or a chill to your spine

Sleep well my Lady, the high winds meant nothing tonight

 

 

(Poem) Rain Drops Again, Evil Or Friend (#2)

Rain Drops Again, Evil Or Friend

 

Here in eastern Kentucky it has been quite wet

TV says in the north-east the water is running high

So hot and dry in Florida matchsticks run and hide

Jet-stream to low there yet here its way to high

 

Farmers look for spring moisture to bring the Earth alive

To much spring rain or a late freeze all their seeds will die

We all gotta have some water but not ever this damn high

Earth’s having it’s 10,000 year itch for us its quite a bitch

 

As the Earth’s Polar ends move turns out we must do so too

The Sahara is now the land of wheat, corn, soybeans and carrots

Now days in Nebraska and Kansas the sand dunes go for on for miles

Waking up to rain drops again was it a dream or beginning of the end

 

The reasons Hurricane Dorian is particularly dangerous

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

Here are some of the reasons Hurricane Dorian is particularly dangerous

The differences between weather forecast models

JUST WATCHED

The differences between weather forecast models 01:12

(CNN)Hurricane Dorian is scary for a lot of reasons, not the least of which is that it’s expected to be a monstrous Category 4 storm by the time it gets to Florida early next week.

Winds that strong would be worrying enough, but that’s just one piece of Dorian’s package of threats.
With the caveat that forecasts often change as the storm approaches, here are the risks Dorian seems poised to pose:

It could be dark at landfall

Forecasts as of midday Friday predict Dorian making landfall late Monday or early Tuesday — while it’s still dark — somewhere on Florida’s Atlantic coast.
“One of the worst things you can have is a dark landfall,” CNN meteorologist Chad Myers said. “You hear things moving, you don’t know where they came from. You don’t how big that thing was that just crashed.”

It could bring winds of 130+ mph

Forecasters predict the maximum sustained winds at Dorian’s core will be more than 130 mph when it makes landfall in Florida.
That would make it the strongest hurricane to strike the state’s Atlantic coast since catastrophic Andrew in 1992.
It also would put Dorian into the Category 4 range (130 to 156 mph).
Winds of at least 130 mph cause catastrophic damage. The National Weather Service puts it this way: Even well-built homes can lose roofs and some exterior walls. Trees and power poles are snapped or toppled.
Power outages could last weeks in areas affected by winds of these speeds.

It’s expected to linger. That will raise flooding threats

Dorian’s forward movement is expected to slow as it approaches land, and it should remain slow over land, eventually taking a turn to the north.
One consequence of that: Dorian would keep dropping heavy rain over the same areas for a long time.
That would lead to freshwater flooding. Heavy rain is forecast over much of Florida — as many as 20 inches dropping in parts of eastern and central portions of the state, Myers said. Coastal Georgia, too, should watch for heavy rain.
Strong winds also will batter areas over and over. The storm’s core should lose strength as it moves over land, but remember, its forward movement is expected to be a crawl. As of Friday, some forecasts had Dorian still somewhere over Florida about 24 hours after landfall — and still with low-end Category 1 winds.
A forecast map created August 30 shows predicted rainfall accumulations through September 6.

Storm surges could be bad. King Tides could make them worse

With any landfalling hurricane, you’ll want to look for storm surges — winds and pressure pushing seawater onto land. In Dorian’s case — churning counterclockwise and moving westward into land — we may see a good amount of storm surge just to the north of Dorian’s landfall spot.
Dorian is approaching at an unfortunate time, as far as storm surges go. Friday marked the start of Florida’s King Tides, a term that refers to the highest tides in any given period.
“The fact that this storm is hitting during some of the highest tides of the year is very concerning,” CNN senior meteorologist Brandon Miller said. “The King Tides adding a couple of feet to the water height is almost like the storm being a category higher on scale.”
King Tides combining with storm surges could mean people who typically consider themselves safely away from shore could, in fact, be in danger.
Storm surges north of wherever Dorian makes landfall “could easily be over 8 to 12 feet,” Myers said.

Hurricane Dorian lashes Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, could hit Florida as Category 3

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NBC NEWS)

 

Hurricane Dorian lashes Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico, could hit Florida as Category 3

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis declared a state of emergency as forecasters said Dorian promised “life-threatening flash floods.”

Iceland commemorates first glacier lost to climate change

(This article is courtesy of the Hindustan Times of India)

 

Iceland commemorates first glacier lost to climate change

Iceland’s Prime Minister Katrin Jakobsdottir, Environment Minister Gudmundur Ingi Gudbrandsson, and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson are also due to attend the event.

WORLD Updated: Aug 18, 2019 09:47 IST

Agence France-Presse
Agence France-Presse

Reykjavik
This combination of Sept. 14, 1986, left, and Aug. 1, 2019 photos provided by NASA shows the shrinking of the Okjokull glacier on the Ok volcano in west-central Iceland.
This combination of Sept. 14, 1986, left, and Aug. 1, 2019 photos provided by NASA shows the shrinking of the Okjokull glacier on the Ok volcano in west-central Iceland.(AP)

Iceland on Sunday honors the passing of Okjokull, its first glacier lost to climate change, as scientists warn that some 400 others on the subarctic island risk the same fate.

A bronze plaque will be unveiled in a ceremony starting around 1400 GMT to mark Okjokull — which translates to “Ok glacier” — in the west of Iceland, in the presence of local researchers and their peers at Rice University in the United States, who initiated the project.

Iceland’s Prime Minister Katrin Jakobsdottir, Environment Minister Gudmundur Ingi Gudbrandsson, and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights Mary Robinson are also due to attend the event.

“This will be the first monument to a glacier lost to climate change anywhere in the world,” Cymene Howe, associate professor of anthropology at Rice University, said in July.

The plaque bears the inscription “A letter to the future,” and is intended to raise awareness about the decline of glaciers and the effects of climate change.

“In the next 200 years all our glaciers are expected to follow the same path. This monument is to acknowledge that we know what is happening and what needs to be done. Only you know if we did it,” the plaque reads.

It is also labelled “415 ppm CO2,” referring to the record level of carbon dioxide measured in the atmosphere last May.

“Memorials everywhere stand for either human accomplishments, like the deeds of historic figures, or the losses and deaths we recognise as important,” researcher Howe said.

“By memorializing a fallen glacier, we want to emphasize what is being lost — or dying — the world over, and also draw attention to the fact that this is something that humans have ‘accomplished’, although it is not something we should be proud of.”

Howe noted that the conversation about climate change can be abstract, with many dire statistics and sophisticated scientific models that can feel incomprehensible.

“Perhaps a monument to a lost glacier is a better way to fully grasp what we now face,” she said, highlighting “the power of symbols and ceremony to provoke feelings”.

Iceland loses about 11 billion tonnes of ice per year, and scientists fear all of the island country’s 400-plus glaciers will be gone by 2200, according to Howe and her Rice University colleague Dominic Boyer.

– Stripped in 2014 –

Glaciologists stripped Okjokull of its glacier status in 2014, a first for Iceland.

In 1890, the glacier ice covered 16 square kilometres (6.2 square miles) but by 2012, it measured just 0.7 square kilometres, according to a report from the University of Iceland from 2017.

In 2014, “we made the decision that this was no longer a living glacier, it was only dead ice, it was not moving,” Oddur Sigurdsson, a glaciologist with the Icelandic Meteorological Office, told AFP.

To have the status of a glacier, the mass of ice and snow must be thick enough to move by its own weight. For that to happen the mass must be approximately 40 to 50 meters (130 to 165 feet) thick, he said.

According to a study published by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN)in April, nearly half of the world’s heritage sites could lose their glaciers by 2100 if greenhouse gas emissions continue at the current rate.

Sigurdsson said he feared “that nothing can be done to stop it.”

“The inertia of the climate system is such that, even if we could stop introducing greenhouse gases into the atmosphere right now, it will keep on warming for century and a half or two centuries before it reaches equilibrium.”

Iceland’s Vatnajokull National Park, which was added to UNESCO’s World Heritage List in early July, is home to, and named after, the largest ice cap in Europe.

(This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text.)

First Published: Aug 18, 2019 09:12 IST

China: Death toll rises to 22 as Typhoon Lekima sweeps through east China

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SHANGHAI CHINA NEWSPAPER ‘SHINE’)

 

Death toll rises to 22 as Typhoon Lekima sweeps through east China

Xinhua
Death toll rises to 22 as Typhoon Lekima sweeps through east China

Xinhua

Rescuers are seen at the typhoon damaged area in Shanzao Village of Yantan Town in Yongjia County, east China’s Zhejiang Province, August 10, 2019.

The death toll has risen to 22 due to a typhoon-triggered barrier lake burst in eastern China’s Zhejiang Province, said local authorities.

As of 8pm Saturday, 10 people were still missing, said a source with the publicity department of Yongjia County.

With a maximum wind force of 187 km/h, Typhoon Lekima, the ninth of the year, made landfall at about 1:45 am Saturday in Wenling City, Zhejiang, with Yongjia County the worst hit.

Typhoon Lekima brought heavy rainstorms in Yongjia County and caused a landslide that blocked rivers, raising the water level to a maximum of 10 m within 10 minutes and trapping 120 villagers.

More than 420 armed police and firefighters were dispatched to the scene to help with the rescue work.

Communication service has been restored, and water and electricity supply and road repair are underway.

Typhoon Lekima is expected to move at about 15 km per hour northward and westward with abatement of wind, according to the weather forecast.

China: Typhoon Lekima lashes Shanghai

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SHANGHAI CHINA NEWSPAPER ‘SHINE’)

 

Typhoon Lekima lashes Shanghai

Shine
Typhoon Lekima lashes Shanghai

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

People walk in Lujiazui in the Pudong New Area on Saturday.

Typhoon Lekima lashes Shanghai

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

The Shanghai Meteorological Bureau upgraded the yellow rainstorm alert to orange at 2:20 pm on Saturday, the second highest on China’s four color-coded weather-warning system.

Under the influence of typhoon Lekima, the maximum rainfall in the city’s downtown, Jiading, Minhang, Fengxian districts and the Pudong New Area was expected to reach 60 to 80 millimeters per hour in the next six hours, the bureau warned.

The bureau issued a yellow alert for thunder and lightning on 1:50 pm on Saturday.

In China’s color-coded weather-warning system, red represents the most severe, followed by orange, yellow and blue.

Rainstorms and gales with a level of 9 to 11 are lashing the city’s central and southern areas under the influence of Lekima, according to the bureau.

Typhoon Lekima lashes Shanghai

Metro Line 5 was suspended from 3:30pm, said Shanghai Metro. Sections of Line 9 between Zhongchun Road station and Songjiang New Town station also stopped  about the same time.

With outdoor tourist attractions and parks such as Shanghai Disney Resort and Shanghai Wild Animal Park closing on Saturday, some indoor venues witnessed big crowds.

The Shanghai Science and Technology Museum put a cap on the number of visitors from 10:54 am, and the number of its visitors reached 13,244 at 11:34 am, approaching its maximum capacity of 13,500.

The Shanghai Natural History Museum was also crowded on Saturday. The number of visitors hit 4,149 at the same time, compared with its capacity of 5,900.

The center of typhoon Lekima was inside Zhuji, Shaoxing City, in neighboring Zhejiang Province, at 1pm. It has weakened to a strong tropical storm with a maximum gale force of 10, according to the National Meteorological Center.

It is moving north at 15 kilometers per hour, according to the center.

Lekima will whistle past the Taihu Lake at the same latitude with Shanghai on Saturday night, according to the Shanghai bureau.

Typhoon Lekima lashes Shanghai

Stranded passengers in Hongqiao Railway Station on Saturday.

Typhoon Lekima lashes Shanghai

Dong Jun / SHINE

Stranded passengers in Hongqiao International Airport on Saturday.

Typhoon Lekima lashes Shanghai

Dong Jun / SHINE
Typhoon Lekima lashes Shanghai

Jiang Xiaowei / SHINE

People walk difficultly on the Nanjing Road Pedestrian Mall on Saturday afternoon.

Linda Tauhid

Linda Tauhid's Journal

Corporate Dispatch

Daily News Feed

Current School News

Best Rated Educational Update Portal in the World; Examination and Academic Guide, High Paying Jobs & Scholarship Website

PEOPLE|PLACES|THINGS

Travel writing for adventurous cheapskates

Retirement 101 with AnneMarie

Finding my way from employment to retirement

Be Still My Wandering Heart

Exploring friendship, love, feminism, travel, sex, poetry and adventure

Random Thoughts

Raghu Menon

%d bloggers like this: