Chicago is bracing for its biggest snow since 2015

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

Chicago is bracing for its biggest snow since 2015

Story highlights

  • Huge snowfall expected in Midwest swath
  • Schools will be closed in metro Chicago, Detroit

(CNN)Chicago commuters, there’s no other way to put this: Your drive Friday is going to be a bear.

A narrow band of very heavy snow will hit the United States’ third largest city by population beginning Thursday night. Schools will be closed as millions see accumulations of 8 to 14 inches by late Friday.
“Travel will be very difficult to impossible at times, including during the morning commute,” the National Weather Service said in a winter storm warning.
The snow will linger into Saturday, and a lighter round is likely Sunday.
Detroit will get a snow dump of its own: The forecast is for 6 to 9 inches. It, too, has closed its schools.
Chicago officials say they are ready. Trucks, plows and tons of salt are in position, they said at a Thursday afternoon news conference.
“Make no mistake about it: This is a heavy snow, heavier than we have seen in a number of winters,” said Mayor Rahm Emanuel. “Now, Chicago is used to this. On the other hand, over the last winters we haven’t had a snow at this level. And it is not just one night, it is going to go through the weekend.”
Chicagoans are a hardy bunch, but a foot of snow is still a big deal. From 1884 to 2018, Chicago has had only nine days with 12-plus inches of snow.
Residents weathered 20 inches over two days in February 2011. A storm in February 2015, logging in at 16.2 inches, was the last time Chicago had more than 10 inches of snow in a single storm.
Chicago and Detroit flight cancellations for Friday were on the way up, according to tracking website flightaware.com. By Thursday evening, more than 600 flights were canceled to and from the two cities.
To the east, snow emergencies have been declared in many metro Detroit communities, according to CNN affiliate WDIV. Michigan State Police said “snowmageddon” was approaching.
“Please remember with all of the school closings that there will be lots of kids playing in the snow and they may not be watching! Drive carefully!” the agency tweeted.

(Love Poem) High Winds

HIGH WINDS

 

Not tired so I decided to stay up a while tonight

No particular reason, just that I wished to tonight

About one A.M. I start to hear the high winds roll

Down the Pass straight to our home they blow

The house creaks and cracks to say it’s hello

 

Wife sound a sleep at the back-end of the house we share

Winds always bother her, she has lived in the alley of big blows

My lady had snoozed so I ushered her to bed about midnight

A big blow once picked up her car with her and her baby inside

It sat them back down on the highway, still unhurt and alive

 

Sweet dreams to my Lady, sleeping quietly tonight

Wrapped up with her Boo kitty all snuggled in tight

About five A.M. now, it think the big winds have died

Big winds can be so soothing, or, bring a chill to your bones

Sleep well my Lady, the high winds meant nothing tonight

 

 

Temperatures Plunged to -88.6°F in Parts of Russia

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME NEWS)

 

By ASSOCIATED PRESS

Updated: January 16, 2018 12:33 PM ET

(MOSCOW) — People living in some of the coldest places on earth are hunkering down as temperatures fall to near-record lows that are even defeating thermometers.

Temperatures in the remote, diamond-rich Russian region of Yakutia on Tuesday plunged to minus 67 degrees Celsius (minus 88.6 degrees Fahrenheit) in some areas.

In Yakutia — about 3,300 miles east of Moscow — where students routinely go to school in minus 40 degrees, school was canceled throughout the region. Local police also ordered parents to keep their children at home.

Over the weekend, two men froze to death when they tried to walk to a nearby farm after their car broke down. Three other men who were with them survived because they were wearing warmer clothes, local investigators reported on Monday.

The press office of Yakutia’s governor said Tuesday all households and businesses in the region have working central heating and access to backup power generators.

In the village of Oymyakon, one of the coldest inhabited places on earth, state-owned television showed mercury falling to the bottom of a thermometer that was only set up to measure down to minus 50. In 2013, Oymyakon recorded an all-time low of minus 71 degrees Celsius (minus 98 Fahrenheit).

Residents of Yakutia, home to nearly 1 million people, are no strangers to cold weather, and this week’s cold spell was not even dominating headlines in local media on Tuesday. Some media outlets, however, ran stories of selfies and stunts in the extreme cold. Women posted pictures of their frozen eyelashes, while YakutiaMedia published a picture of Chinese students who got undressed to take a plunge in a thermal spring.

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Plane Skids off Runway, Over Cliff in Northern Turkey

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE ‘WEATHER COMPANY’)

 

Plane Skids off Runway, Over Cliff in Northern Turkey

By Melissa Kory

4 hours ago

weather.com

image
A Boeing 737-800 of Turkey’s Pegasus Airlines after skidding off the runway downhill towards the sea at the airport in Trabzon, Turkey, Sunday, Jan. 14, 2018. Trabzon Gov. Yucel Yavuz said all 162 passengers and crew on board were evacuated and safe early Sunday. The cause of the accident was not yet known. (DHA-Depo Photos via AP)

At a Glance

  • A plane with 168 people skidded off a runway in northern Turkey.
  • The plane came to rest on a slope close to the Black Sea.
  • No injuries were reported.

A commercial airplane skidded off a runway and down the side of a cliff overlooking the Black Sea while landing at an airport in the northern Turkish province of Trabzon Saturday night.

“Light rain was reported at the Trabzon airport late Saturday night into early Sunday morning,” weather.com meteorologist Christopher Dolce said.

The Pegasus Airlines Boeing 737-800 had 162 passengers and six crew members on board, according to the Associated Press.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

flight overruns the runway at Airport in All 162 passengers were evacuated with only minor injuries reported.

The passengers were evacuated and no injuries were reported. The cause of the incident is still being investigated, BBC reports.

“We tilted to the side, the front was down while the plane’s rear was up. There was panic; people shouting, screaming,” Fatma Gordu, who was on the flight, told state-run news agency Anadolu.

“It’s a miracle we escaped. We could have burned, exploded, flown into the sea,” Gordu said. “Thank God for this. I feel like I’m going crazy when I think about it.”

The airport was closed for several hours before resuming flights on Sunday morning.

It’s so hot in Australia that bats’ brains are frying

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON POST)

 

It’s so hot in Australia that bats’ brains are frying

 January 9 at 1:32 PM
 4:27
Sydney heat wave kills hundreds of flying foxes

Hundreds of flying foxes in the Greater Sydney area were found dead amid an extreme heat wave that struck Sydney on January 7.

It has been a weird few weeks of weather. In North America, Canadians and Floridians alike shivered through freezing temperatures, a bomb cyclone and a polar vortex. (It got so cold that iguanas froze and fell out of trees.)

Meanwhile, over in Australia, where it is summer now, it has been especially hot. Sweltering, really.

In Sydney, temperatures hit 117 degrees Fahrenheit on Sunday, the hottest it has been since 1939. That oppressive heat, a side effect of climate change, has made life hard for the country’s humans and infrastructure. Heat waves result in 10 percent more calls for ambulances and 10 percent more deaths, local experts said. Police in Victoria, on Australia’s southeastern coast, warned drivers last week that a six-mile stretch of a freeway in the central part of the state had melted. A spokeswoman for VicRoads, which manages Victoria’s road systems, told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. that hot weather caused the asphalt to become “soft and sticky” and the road surface to bleed.

It has also been nearly unbearable for some animals. “Anytime we have any type of heat event, we know we’re going to have a lot of animals in need,” animal specialist Kristie Harris told the BBC. It was so hot that possums burned their paws on roofs and roads. Birds needed to be specially rehydrated. Koalas around the region were being sprayed down to keep them cool.

And hundreds of flying fox bats died because they didn’t have enough cover to protect themselves from the heat. Animal rescuers in Sydney described “heartbreaking” scenes of dozens of dead baby bats piled on the ground. As the adult bats sought shade near a creek, babies were left dangling from trees with no means to survive the heat, according to a charity organization in the Sydney suburb of Campbelltown, home to colonies of flying foxes. Many were found scattered on the ground. Others died before they made it down.

“It was unbelievable. I saw a lot of dead bats on the ground and others were close to the ground and dying,” volunteer Cate Ryan told the Guardian. “I have never seen anything like it before.”

Flying foxes have adapted to Australia’s warm climate, but these fruit-eating bats are unable to regulate their body temperature when the outside temperature rises above 104 degrees Fahrenheit. The young ones are especially vulnerable, Ryan told the Camden-Narellan Advertiser.

“They have less heat tolerance,” she said. “Their brain just fries and they become incoherent.” Often, she said, they will simply get too hot and fall to the ground while the adults seek out precious shade.


A heat-stricken bat is rescued in Sydney. (Help Save the Wildlife and Bushlands in Campbelltown/AFP/Getty Images)

Wildlife volunteers and rescuers spent Sunday picking up bodies of about 200 flying foxes, most of which were babies, according to the charity Help Save the Wildlife and Bushlands in Campbelltown. The death toll was expected to rise to the thousands, as many were still dangling from trees and were unreachable to volunteers.

“Many pups were on their last breaths before getting much needed help . . . There were tears shed and hearts sunken,” the charity said Sunday in a lengthy Facebook post. “It’s devastating when a colony like our local one goes down like this due to heat, this colony needs more canopy cover and shaded areas to help with our ever rising hot summers because this episode will surely not be the last.”

Australia considers the gray-headed flying fox, one of four types, a vulnerable species — with about 400,000 left, down from more than 560,000 in 1989. The bats live in woods and swamps along Australia’s east coast and play an important role in pollination and seed transportation.

Experts link the plight of flying foxes to the globe’s steadily rising temperature. More than 30,000 flying foxes died across Australia during heat waves between 1994 and 2008, bat ecologist Micaela Jemison wrote in 2014.

Last year, more than 2,000 flying foxes were found dead in the Richmond Valley region of northern New South Wales on Australia’s east coast, the Australian Broadcasting Corp. reported. Temperatures topped 113 degrees Fahrenheit. About 100,000 bats across the state of Queensland died during a heat wave in 2014.

“This is of great concern to scientists not only due to the increased risk of these ‘die off’ events, but also for the long term impact it will have on the recovery of several of these already threatened species,” Jemison wrote.

Australia’s heat wave — and the United States’s bomb cyclone — come on the heels of the second-warmest global year on record since the 1800s.

A new report, pointing to signs of climate change such as the thawing of Arctic ice and intensifying wildfires, says the global average surface air temperature in 2017 exceeded 14.7 degrees Celsius (58.46 Fahrenheit), making last year a bit cooler than 2016, the warmest on record. But 2016 included the tail end of a strong El Niño in the tropical Pacific, and that bumped up temperatures that year, as well as in 2015, according to the report by the Copernicus Climate Change Service, a European agency.

These findings are echoed in Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology’s climate report for 2017, the country’s third-warmest year on record.

“Despite the lack of an El Nino — which is normally associated with our hottest years — 2017 was still characterized by very warm temperatures. Both day and nighttime temperatures were warmer than average . . . Seven of Australia’s ten warmest years have occurred since 2005 and Australia has experienced just one cooler than average year — 2011 — in the past decade,” according to a news release.

It snowed in one of the hottest places in the world

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

It snowed in one of the hottest places in the world

Snow in the Sahara Desert near the town of Ain Sefra, Algeria

(CNN)It’s quite a time for weird weather, and it doesn’t get much weirder than snow falling in one of the hottest places in the world.

On Sunday, Ain Sefra, a desert town in Algeria known as the “Gateway to the Sahara,” experienced a substantial amount of snow for reportedly the third time in 40 years. Some reports say parts of the area got nearly 15 inches of snow, but Ain Sefra officially reported less than one inch.

It was enough to provide some otherworldly visuals from an area that routinely sees some of the hottest temperatures on earth during the summer.

Now, it’s not uncommon for the temperature across even the hottest of deserts to plunge tens of degrees Farenheit at night, meaning any unusual snow could stick around for a while. But photographers at the scene said the snow actually stayed intact for a good portion of the day.

“We were really surprised when we woke up to see snow again,” photographer Karim Bouchetata told Shutterstock. “It stayed all day on Sunday and began melting at around 5 p.m.”

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While snow is historically scant in the desert area, a similar snow phenomenon happened just last year. Before that, it had been 37 years since Ain Sefra’s last snowfall.

Welcome to 2018! Here’s a week-long deep freeze to help you celebrate

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN WEATHER)

 

(CNN)Welcome to 2018! Here’s a week-long deep freeze to help you celebrate.

The brutal chill that froze much of the country on New Year’s Day will get even more miserable later this week.
“The cold is here to stay and the worst is yet to come,” CNN meteorologist Taylor Ward said.
More than 100 million people from Canada to Mexico are under wind chill warnings and advisories on Tuesday, according to CNN meteorologist Monica Garrett.
On New Year’s Day, 90% of the US failed to warm up to 32 degrees, CNN meteorologist Ivan Cabrera said.
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You know it’s bad when even Dallas can’t get above freezing.
Hard freeze warnings remain in effect through Wednesday in typically balmy states, from Texas to northern Florida, the National Weather Service said.
And for the rest of the week, “much below normal temperatures and dangerous cold wind chills” will afflict much of the central and eastern US.
The wind chills plummeted to -28 in Fargo, North Dakota, and -6 in Tennessee on Tuesday.
If you live anywhere north or northeast of Oklahoma, you’d feel warmer walking into a freezer than walking outside.
Here’s what else different parts of the country can expect:

The Southeast: Snow on the beach

The Southeast will stay 10 to 15 degrees below average temperatures through the weekend, Ward said.
In coastal South Carolina, “it could be snowing on the beach in the next couple of days,” Cabrera said Tuesday.

The Midwest: School closures

The Plains and Midwest will warm slightly — but that’s totally relative. Temperatures in Minneapolis will rise from below zero to 12 degrees on Tuesday, Ward said.
Indianapolis Public Schools and Cincinnati Public Schools canceled classes for Tuesday,
But by the end of the week, temperatures will be near zero again in the Great Lakes region, Garrett said.

The Northeast: The deep plunge

Get ready, New York City. Your temperatures will keep plunging through the week, with “high” temperatures of 14 and 10 on Friday and Saturday. Your low temperatures on both days will be 2 degrees.
Boston is expected to freeze below 0 degrees on Saturday, Ward said.

Tropical Storm Tembin Heads to Vietnam

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WEATHER CHANNEL)

 

Hundreds of Thousands Evacuated as Deadly Tropical Storm Tembin Heads to Vietnam

By Associated Press
Dec 24 2017 09:15 AM EST
weather.com

Story Highlights

Hundreds of thousands in Vietnam have been forced to evacuate ahead of Tropical Storm Tembin’s arrival.

More than 160 people are dead and over 160 are missing in the Philippines due to the storm.

Tembin caused deadly flash floods and landslides in the Philippines.

It s expected to strengthen as it tracks westward.

Hundreds of thousands of residents in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam were told to evacuate Monday as deadly Tropical Storm Tembin tracks westward from the Philippines.

Officials say several hundreds of thousands fled their homes, a majority of which are made of tin sheets and wooden panels. In Vung Tau city, thousands of fishing boats were forced to halt their several-month-long trips to return to the shore.

Tembin caused more than 160 deaths and left 171 missing after it lashed the southern Philippines, triggering flash floods and landslides.

Most of the deaths from Tropical Storm Tembin were in the hard-hit provinces of Lanao del Norte and Lanao del Sur and on the Zamboanga Peninsula, according to an initial government report on storm casualties.

It’s the latest disaster to hit the Philippines, which is battered by about 20 typhoons and storms each year, making the archipelago that lies on the Pacific typhoon belt one of the world’s most disaster-prone countries.

(MORE: Southern California’s Thomas Fire Now Largest in State History)

A search and rescue operation was underway for more than 30 people swept away by flash floods in the fishing village of Anungan, Mayor Bong Edding of Zamboanga del Norte province’s Sibuco town said by phone. Five bodies have been recovered so far in the village.

The rest of the deaths were reported in Lanao del Norte, where floodwaters from a mountain also swept away several riverside houses and villagers, and Lanao del Sur, police and officials said.

Lanao del Norte officials reported the highest death toll at 64 with 139 missing followed by Zamboanga del Norte province, where officials reported at least 29 storm deaths with 19 others missing. The storm left 21 dead and one missing in the lakeside province of Lanao del Sur, according to the Department of Interior and Local Government.

More than 97,000 people remain in 261 evacuation centers across the south, while nearly 85,000 more people are displaced and staying elsewhere as of Monday.

An inter-island ferry sank off northeastern Quezon province last week after being lashed by fierce winds and big waves, leaving at least five people dead. More than 250 passengers and crewmen were rescued.

Tembin, known locally as Vinta, strengthened and picked up speed late Saturday, packing maximum sustained winds of 105 kilometers (65 miles) per hour and gusts of up to 145 kph (90 mph). It struck the southern section of western Palawan province late Saturday and is forecast to blow away from the southern Philippines on Sunday toward the South China Sea.

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The Weather Company’s primary journalistic mission is to report on breaking weather news, the environment and the importance of science to our lives. This story does not necessarily represent the position of our parent company, IBM.

Tropical Storm Tembin Leaves At Least 75 Dead In Philippines

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

Tropical Storm Tembin hit the southern island of Mindanao in the Philippines on Fridaykilling at least 75 people, authorities said.

At least 58 people have been reported missing, according to spokeswoman Mina Marasigan of the Philippines National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council.
More than 70,000 people have been affected by Tembin, called “Vinta” in the Philippines. At least 30,000 people were taken to shelters, Marasigan said.
Heavy rain from the storm led to the collapse of artificial dams, which prompted widespread flooding and triggered landslides in the mountains.
Most of the deaths occurred in Lanao del Norte, with additional ones in several other towns, including Payao and Lanao del Sur, the affiliate reported
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Rescue workers evacuate flood-affected residents in Davao on the southern Philippine island of Mindanao after Tropical Storm Tembin dumped torrential rains across the island.

Other fatalities included a 4-year-old who died after being trapped in a landslide in Payao and a prisoner killed when the jail’s roof collapsed due to strong winds and rains in Butuan City, CNN Philippines reported, citing the Philippine Red Cross.

Police officers evacuate a baby in Cagayan city after Tropical Storm Tembin hit.

By Saturday morning, Tembin was packing maximum sustained winds of 80 kph (50 mph). The storm is headed toward the island province of Palawan, according to Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical Astronomical Services Administration.

Tropical Storm Unleashes Deadly Destruction on Philippines

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF GLOBAL VOICES)

 

Tropical Storm Unleashes Deadly Destruction on Philippines Four Years After Super Typhoon Haiyan

Screenshot from local news coverage of tropical storm Kai-Tak (local name Urduja) by PTV Philippines.

Philippine officials reported that at least 46 people were killed while another 28 are still missing after tropical storm Kai-Tak (local name Urduja) battered Eastern Visayas, the region hardest hit by super typhoon Haiyan (local name Yolanda) four years ago.

Eastern Visayas is composed of the three main islands Biliran, Leyte, and Samar, which are the easternmost islands of the central Philippine island group of Visayas. Facing the Pacific Ocean to its east, the region is the typical entry point of tropical storms to the Philippines.

Most of the people killed or missing — mostly by landslides, authorities say — hail from the province of Biliran, which posted 25 dead and 25 missing people. Over 44,000 families have been evacuated and at least 16,000 passengers were stranded in various areas of the Philippines.

Tropical storm Kai-Tak caused damage to five bridges that effectively cut off Biliran from Leyte and the rest of the region, thus posing challenges on the bringing of heavy equipment and supplies to the island.

Activist Joshua Musico Sagdullas writes for Eastern Visayas-based alternative news site Eastern Vista to ask if the new government has learned any lesson at all from the devastation wrought by super typhoon Haiyan in November 2013:

What we expected was for the rain to pour and winds to howl, we thought work would be suspended for a day or two and some roads impassable due to slight debris pile up. We would never have thought the storm would cause evacuation-efforts spanning three regions or paralyzed the economy of close to three provinces in Eastern Visayas.

Netizens and journalists have used the hashtag #UrdujaPH on social media to give updates on the storm and post photos of its impact. Groups have also taken to social media to call for donations and disaster relief efforts, especially for some of the most affected areas like Biliran.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

Photos: Pinsalang iniwan ni Bagyong Urduja sa Leyte

The dead left by typhoon Urduja in Leyte.

View image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on TwitterView image on Twitter

Queue of stranded vehicles outside Matnog Port in Sorsogon reaches 4 km. (📸 MDRRMO Matnog) |  @InquirerSLB

Netizens have also asked if Kai-Tak’s impact on Biliran was further magnified by the presence of sulfur mining in the area. The Mines and Geosciences Bureau has warnedabout the threat of landslides in Biliran ahead of Kai-Tak’s appearance.

May sulphur mining man daw ha iyo 💔

Tungod ha ira, damo nagkamatay. Dre la sulphur mining it nagaganap ha Biliran. Sana maging sensitive it Province ngan LGU para ma-address it mga sugad na issue, ginhihinay hinay la nira pagguba ht Biliran. 💔

Many died because of this. Sulphur mining is happening in Biliran. Hopefully the provincial local government unit would be sensitive and address this issue. They are slowly destroying Biliran.

: Melanie Bingco gives updates on the situation in Biliran amid pic.twitter.com/vA6fwVNny6

My Sulfur mining sa bundok ng Biliran province 35 years na ako ngaun lang ngyari sa province namin ito.. Nakakaiyak 😦

There’s sulfur mining in the mountains of Biliran. I’ve been in Biliran province 35 years this happened to our province only now. Heartbreaking.

But even as tropical storm Kai-Tak has already left the Philippines as it moved to the West Philippine Sea, the country is again bracing for the entry of another weather disturbance which is expected to make landfall on Christmas eve.

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