India: 5 dead, school, colleges shut as rain wreaks havoc in Tamil Nadu

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HINDUSTAN TIMES OF INDIA)

 

5 dead, school, colleges shut as rain wreaks havoc in Tamil Nadu

The heavy rain has left several places in Tamil Nadu water logged and forced authorities to evacuate about 1000 people in Cuddalore district.

INDIA Updated: Dec 02, 2019 05:56 IST

M Manikandan
M Manikandan

Hindustan Times, Chennai
A general view of the water-logged area during the heavy rain, in Rameswaram (ANI Photo)
A general view of the water-logged area during the heavy rain, in Rameswaram (ANI Photo)

The regional meteorological centre in Chennai on Sunday predicted more showers in the next two days and issued a red alert for six districts in Tamil Nadu while torrential rain over the past two days claimed five lives.

“Thiruvallur, Vellore, Thiruvannamalai, Thoothukkudi, Ramanathapuram and Tirunelveli districts in Tamil Nadu would receive extremely heavy rainfall (above 20cm) in the next 24 hours,” the IMD’s Chennai regional centre alerted.

In view of heavy rainfall forecast, examinations of Madras University and Anna University scheduled for Monday have been postponed.

As Chennai received 9cm rain in the past 36 hours and spells are continuing, Chennai district administration declared leave for schools and colleges on Monday. According to Tamil Nadu State Disaster Management Agency, schools will be closed in Chengelpet, Thiruvallur, Ramanathapuram, Thoothukkudi, Ramanathapuram and Cuddalore districts too.

According to Puviyarasan, Director, Regional Meteorological Center (RMC) Chennai, Tamil Nadu will get heavy rainfall for the next two days.

“In the past 24 hours, Thoothukkudi’s Sathankulam town had recorded 19 cm rainfall. Cuddalore had received 17 cm, and Thirunelveli district got 16 cm of rainfall. Due to the low-pressure area near Lakshadweep storms could occur in the South-Eastern Arabian Sea. So, fishermen should not venture into the sea for the next few days,” the RMC director told reporters.

He said Tamil Nadu had received 39 cm of rainfall since October 1 during this North-East Monsoon season.

Due to the heavy rainfall Duraikkanu (70) a resident of Moonram Sethi village in Thanjavur district, Ravichandran (50) from Paravakkottai in Thiruvarur district, Poongodhai (50), a physically challenged person in Ariyalur district died on Saturday as portions of their houses collapsed.

Besides, 50-year-old Kandasamy died in Pudukkottai town when his two-wheeler crashed in heavy rain while Sheik Ali (46), a resident of Chennai Ambattur died after falling into a storm water drain Saturday night.

Following the IMD alert, the Puducherry government on Sunday ordered schools to remain shut on Monday.

The heavy rain has left several sub-urban areas of Chennai water logged. These include Shozhinganallur, Pallavaram, Tambaram, Nanmangalam and Selaiyur.

The rain has partially submerged more than 100 houses in the outskirts of Chennai. Chennai City Corporation has opened helplines for people who need assistance to drain out the water.

“We are ready to help people at any time. The corporation staffers are already on the job to drain out the water,” G Prakash, Chennai City Corporation Commissioner told the media.

Several places in Cuddalore, Nagapattinam and Thoothukkudi districts have also been waterlogged.

According to the locals in Cuddalore, around 5000 houses in low lying areas of the coastal town have been marooned. About 500 people from KS Pettai in Cuddalore town have been forced to take shelter in a private marriage hall.

Tamil Nadu Industries Minister M C Sampath who visited the flood-affected areas in Cuddalore district said actions have been taken for draining the water.

“Around 1000 people have been evacuated from flood-hit houses. People have been moved to temporary relief camps. Food and Medical assistance have been kept ready,” Sampath told the media.

Farmers in the delta district said that the sudden rain has inundated more than 5000 acres of the Samba (a variety of rice) crops.

“Samba crops cultivated in the tail-end of parts of Nagapattinam, Thiruvarur and Thanjavur districts have been inundated due to the heavy rain,” said S Ramadoss, Nagapattinam district president for Tamil Nadu Cauvery Farmers Association.

Opposition leader and DMK President MK Stalin urged the state government to work on a war footing to prevent damages and loss of life.

“Tamil Nadu has been receiving severe rainfall for the last few days. So all the district administrations should work on a war footing to prevent life and material loss,” he said in a tweet.

The Central government’s Water Resources department also had sent a warning to Tamil Nadu Government about increasing water levels in the state.

The water storage level in Chennai’s major reservoirs such as Chembaramkkam, Poondi Sathiyamoorthi, Redhills and Cholavaram have been increasing since Friday. These reservoirs had dried up in June last which led to severe water scarcity in Chennai.

India: Mumbai slum dwellers by the sea live at the mercy of climate change

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF INDIA’S HINDUSTAN TIMES)

 

Mumbai slum dwellers by the sea live at the mercy of climate change

Climate change poses a greater threat to poor communities in developing nations like India, Indonesia and the Philippines, with people living on the margins less able to protect themselves from the impact.

MUMBAI Updated: Nov 30, 2019 08:14 IST

Reuters
Reuters

Mumbai
Thousands of people, mostly migrants from other parts of the country, live in temporary shelters, built on rocks at the edge of the sea and are likely to be the first hit from coastal flooding caused by climate change.
Thousands of people, mostly migrants from other parts of the country, live in temporary shelters, built on rocks at the edge of the sea and are likely to be the first hit from coastal flooding caused by climate change. (Satyabrata Tripathy/HT Representative Photo)

Already at risk from rains, flooding and open sewers, slum-dwellers who live by the ocean in the financial capital Mumbai are vulnerable to rising seas caused by global warming and say the government should help them move to safer locations.

Thousands of people, mostly migrants from other parts of the country, live in temporary shelters, built on rocks at the edge of the sea and are likely to be the first hit from coastal flooding caused by climate change.

“Even hearing about (the rising sea levels) we feel afraid. What do we do? We have been living here for so many years. It would be good if the government could do something to help us,” said Kamakshi Tangesh Devender, who lives in a slum in Worli neighborhood.

Climate change poses a greater threat to poor communities in developing nations like India, Indonesia and the Philippines, with people living on the margins less able to protect themselves from the impact.

A research paper by Climate Central, a US.-based non-profit climate science and news organisation, found that climate change will put an estimated 300 million people globally at risk of coastal flooding by 2050.

The UN-backed Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change said in a report in September that sea levels could rise by one meter (3.3 feet) by 2100 — 10 times the rate in the 20th century — if carbon emissions that are responsible for climate change keep climbing.

“Mumbai is going to be under water, we need to plan for that eventuality and what is required is to plan a new city to replace Mumbai as and when it gets submerged. And ideally, to my mind, it should be somewhere inland – at a pretty substantial elevation,” Debi Goenka, an environmental activist, told Reuters.

As well as changing sea levels, scientists say climate change is causing an increase in extreme weather events around the world such as drought and floods.

Mumbai has been hit this year by incessant rains and flooding, causing loss of life and property and halting essential services like local transport. The city received 66% more rainfall than average during the June to September monsoon season, breaking a record set in 1954.

Governments are meeting at a U.N. summit on climate change in Madrid on Dec. 2-13.

India’s rain pattern getting affected by global climate crisis

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HINDUSTAN TIMES OF INDIA)

 

India’s rain pattern getting affected by global climate crisis

In a report published on Wednesday, climate scientists pointed out that the Indo-Pacific warm pool, a stretch of ocean where the temperature remains above 28°C in the winter months, has doubled in size between 1981 ans 2018.

INDIA Updated: Nov 28, 2019 03:29 IST

Jayashree Nandi and Snehal Fernandes
Jayashree Nandi and Snehal Fernandes

Hindustan Times, New Delhi/Mumbai
Scientists have for the first time linked a specific phenomenon brought on by the climate crisis to reduced winter rain in India
Scientists have for the first time linked a specific phenomenon brought on by the climate crisis to reduced winter rain in India(Satyabrata Tripathy/HT Photo)

Scientists have for the first time linked a specific phenomenon brought on by the climate crisis to reduced winter rain in India — a growing patch of warm seas in the Indo-Pacific ocean region that is causing droughts in some regions across the world and extreme floods in others.

In a report published on Wednesday, climate scientists pointed out that the Indo-Pacific warm pool, a stretch of ocean where the temperature remains above 28°C in the winter months, has doubled in size between 1981 ans 2018. This, in turn, has “warped” the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), a band of rain clouds that moves eastwards over the tropics and is responsible for most weather variations in the region — including the south-west and north-east monsoons.

The study, published in the journal Nature and authored by scientists from Pune’s Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), United States’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, University of Washington and University of Tokyo, said that the changes to MJO have a cascading effect that triggers extreme weather events across the globe.

The MJO season begins in October and lasts till April, and the report contends its “warping” has a direct link to lower rainfall in the winter months in north India. Experts separately say the effects also spill over to the summer monsoon,which is crucial for India’s agriculture and economy.

The landmark study comes less than a week before 197 countries gather for the UN Climate Conference (COP25) in Madrid to negotiate on rules around the functioning of carbon markets, how vulnerable countries can be compensated for the loss caused by climate impact, and to decide on how findings of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC’s) 2019 report on land and oceans can be taken on board.

“The MJO location-specific changes in terms of their lifespan has altered weather patterns across the globe because it changes atmospheric circulation that can enhance or suppress tropical rainfall variability, modulate or trigger extreme weather events including hurricanes, droughts, flooding, heat waves and cold surges,” said Roxy Mathew Koll, principal investigator and climate scientist, IITM.

Previous studies have established that an increase in greenhouse gas emissions due to human activities has led to the warming of the Indo-Pacific pool, the study noted.

The study looked at climate model simulations between 1981 and 2018 and found that MJO clouds now remain in Indian Ocean for four fewer days (from an average of 19 days to 15 days). In turn, they have spilled over to the west Pacific region, where they linger for five more days (from an average of 18 days to 23 days).

MJO travels 12,000-20,000km mainly over the Indo-Pacific warm pool and modulates the El Niño Southern Oscillation, tropical cyclones and the monsoons, contributing to severe weather events over Asia, Australia, Africa, Europe and the Americas.

Koll said changes in MJO can affect western disturbances that bring rain to north India and may also reduce the span of summer monsoon rains and cause extreme rainfall events in short duration.

Raghu Murtugudde, professor of atmospheric and oceanic science and earth system science at the University of Maryland, who was not involved in the study, said the report is critical for the Indian monsoon because the MJO season (October to April) dovetails the monsoon season, also known as the Monsoon Intraseasonal Oscillation or MISO season (May to September).

“The monsoon is all about MISOs or active/break periods. Since the variability and change in the monsoon are all manifest in active/break periods and our agriculture depends on active/breaks, this MJO story raises new questions about how MISOs are responding to the Indo-Pacific warm pool changes,” said Murtugudde. “Now the question is to see how MJO changes are related to the MISO changes and what it means for the future of the monsoon.”

A third scientist supported the concerns. “It’s quite possible that changes in MJO are impacting the north-east monsoon. It definitely has a big impact on our summer monsoon which is being documented. MJO is one of fundamental oscillations that impacts the intra-seasonal variability of southwest monsoon,” said SK Dash, climate scientist, IIT Delhi.

In addition to India, the impact spreads to central and east Pacific, east Africa, the Yangtze basin in China, and the east and west coasts of the United States. It is also linked to enhanced rainfall over the Maritime Continent–west pacific region, the Amazon basin in South America, south-west Africa and northern Australia.

The study links MJO changes to California droughts in 2013-2014, South-east Asia floods in 2011 and East Africa droughts in 2011, which occurred during years when the MJO phase duration was longer over the west pacific region. Extreme flooding events in Brazil, such as the 2011 Rio de Janeiro floods are also linked to longer MJO

Iran: Heavy Snow Snarls Traffic, Shuts Schools in Iran Capital

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE SAUDI NEWS AGENCY ASHARQ AL-AWSAT)

 

Heavy Snow Snarls Traffic, Shuts Schools in Iran Capital

Saturday, 16 November, 2019 – 11:30
Tehran spreads up the southern slopes of the Elburz mountains and heavy snowfalls often create challenging driving conditions. (AFP)
Asharq Al-Awsat
Heavy snowfall blanketed the streets of north Tehran on Saturday, causing traffic chaos and forcing the closure of schools, authorities in the Iranian capital said.

Crews of municipal workers were battling to clear roads and pavements in parts of the capital, where snow began falling at the start of the morning rush hour and continued through the day.

“Snow started at a time when there is usually high traffic and now as you can imagine that snow has intensified this traffic,” Hamid Mousavi, mayor of Tehran’s first district, told the ISNA news agency.

The backed-up traffic prevented the use of snow plows and forced the municipality to deploy staff to clear the snow by hand, he said.

One commuter said his journey to work from east Tehran took him twice as long as usual as traffic was backed up on major roads leading to northern districts.

There were only a few accidents, despite the driving conditions and the fact that many vehicles lacked tire chains, a city official said, according to state television’s website.

Schools in some districts were ordered closed in the afternoon.

“Due to the coldness of the weather, snow and forecast of continuing snowfall, all schools will be closed this afternoon in districts one to five and district 22 of Tehran,” deputy governor Mohammad Taghizadeh said, quoted by ISNA.

“Also all schools in Shemiranat county will be closed in the afternoon shift.”

Next week’s Arctic blast will be so cold, forecasters expect it to break 170 records across US

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE USA TODAY NEWS)

 

Next week’s Arctic blast will be so cold, forecasters expect it to break 170 records across US

USA TODAY

This week’s cold snap is only an appetizer compared with the main Arctic blast that’s coming next week, meteorologists said. That freeze could be one for the record books.

“The National Weather Service is forecasting 170 potential daily record cold high temperatures Monday to Wednesday,” tweeted Weather Channel meteorologist Jonathan Erdman. “A little taste of January in November.”

The temperature nosedive will be a three-day process as a cold front charges across the central and eastern U.S. from Sunday into Tuesday.

The front will plunge quickly through the northern Plains and upper Midwest Sunday, into the southern Plains and Ohio Valley Monday, then through most of the East Coast and Deep South by Tuesday, the Weather Channel said.

Melting ice:One of the world’s thickest mountain glaciers is melting because of global warming

SOURCE AccuWeather

High temperatures on Monday may be stuck in the teens and 20’s in the Midwest and around the Great Lakes. It could be the coldest Veterans Day on record in cities such as Chicago and Minneapolis, according to the Weather Channel.

By Tuesday, record cold is possible in the Northeast, Ohio Valley and portions of the South. Highs may get only into the 30’s as far south as Alabama.

The Florida Panhandle may shiver with lows in the 30’s Wednesday and Thursday morning.

Low temperatures may fall below freezing all the way to the Gulf Coast. The most intense cold will be in the northern Plains where temperatures may fall below zero, according to AccuWeather. Gusty winds will make it feel even colder across the region, and time spent outside will need to be limited.

In addition to the cold, a storm system may develop over the central USA, AccuWeather said, bringing icy conditions to the central Plains near the dividing line of warm and cold air next week.

Snow may be in the forecast for portions of the eastern and even southern USA as the storm is likely to track in that direction into the middle of the week.

Tropical Storm Nestor Spawns Tornadoes In Florida

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NBC NEWS)

 

Image:
A camper rests on top of a boat trailer and the corner of a home as Tropical Storm Nestor passed the area on Saturday in Kathleen, Florida. Nestor was downgraded Saturday after it spawned a tornado that damaged several homes.Luis Santana / AP

The tornadoes caused power outages for thousands of customers across central Florida.

“Hurricanes have seen damage, but never have I seen a tornado do something as bad as this,” a resident told NBC News affiliate Telemundo 49 in Tampa.

Officials warned residents of 6- to 8-feet surf and rip currents along Florida’s Gulf Coast.

“As #Nestor moves north, storms associated with this system are still producing dangerous beach conditions across the Gulf Coast, and in areas of the Atlantic Coast,” the Florida Division of Emergency Management tweeted. “Pay attention to beach warning flags and do not swim in dangerous conditions.”

The storm could get a slight second wind Sunday when some strengthening is expected, the weather service said.

When it was still a tropical storm Friday night, Nestor bore down on the northern Gulf Coast with high winds, surging seas and heavy rains. At one point, it had threatened to hit an area of the Panhandle devastated one year ago by Hurricane Michael.

Why Are Seasons Reversed in the Southern Hemisphere?

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

Why Are Seasons Reversed in the Southern Hemisphere?

Have you ever talked on the phone with a friend who lives in the opposite hemisphere? It can be an eye-opening experience, particularly when they start complaining about the weather. While they’re experiencing icy winters and cold, bitter winds, you’re sweating it out in your t-shirt and shorts, trying to beat the summer heat.

But why do the northern and southern hemispheres have opposite seasons? To answer that, we should first take a step back and look at what causes seasonal weather shifts in the first place.

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A Primer on Seasons

Credit: BrianAJackson / iStockPhoto

We’d explain the concept of seasons, but why not let National Geographic do it instead?

A season is a period of the year that is distinguished by special climate conditions. The four seasons — spring, summer, fall, and winter — follow one another regularly. Each has its own light, temperature, and weather patterns that repeat yearly.”

Of course, the classic four season framework applies only to regions at mid-latitudes between the equator and the poles. Seasons are largely dependent on the region’s location relative to the equator, and as you travel closer to or further from the equator, this pattern begins to shift.

Closer to the poles, temperatures are generally colder with fewer hours of daylight. (In Barrow, Alaska, it’s consistently dark throughout most of the winter — close to three months!) But nearer to the equator, it’s warm for most of the year, and daylight cycles stay consistent.

In other words, seasonal shifts are determined by two things:

  1. The region’s location on the globe
  2. The axis of the earth relative to the sun.

That first point is a factor in explaining how extreme seasonal weather shifts can be. But when explaining why seasons are opposite across northern and southern hemispheres, the axis makes all the difference.

The Axis of the Earth Is Key

Credit: sundown001 / iStockPhoto

Our earth has a tilted axis relative to the position of the sun, which is why seasons are opposite across hemispheres.

The Extremes: Summer and Winter

Credit: SUNG YOON JO / iStockPhoto

When Earth’s axis is tilted such that the northern hemisphere leans towards the sun, those regions receive more solar energy, and thus, feel hotter. At the same time, the southern hemisphere receives very little solar energy, producing cold weather. Six months later, the opposite occurs—the other hemisphere tilts towards the sun, and the cycle continues.

The Middle Ground: Autumn and Spring

Credit: SrdjanPav / iStockPhoto

So, winter and summer are opposite. But what about autumn and spring?

These are even easier to understand. Since Earth’s axis produces a tilt that creates opposite seasons across the equator, there’s a sort of “middle ground” that occurs as Earth spins towards its summer/winter extremes. This middle ground is, essentially, the autumn and spring seasons.

Seasons Aren’t so Different

Credit: LeManna / iStockPhoto

During these mild seasons, both hemispheres receive the same amount of solar radiation, producing similar weather conditions across the north and south. The key difference comes from each region’s starting point.

When a region moves into autumn, it’s moving from a period of high solar energy (summer) into a lower period. And conversely, regions moving from winter to spring slowly gain solar energy. In this way, autumn and spring are functionally the same thing. The only difference is where each region begins.

India: Schools shut in Mumbai after alert of extremely heavy rainfall today

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HINDUSTAN TIMES OF INDIA)

 

Schools shut in Mumbai after alert of extremely heavy rainfall today

The Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) forecasted heavy rainfall and has issued a red rain alert for Mumbai and Raigad districts. This indicates a precipitation of more than 204 mm in 24 hours starting Thursday morning.

INDIA Updated: Sep 19, 2019 11:54 IST

HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent

Hindustan Times, Mumbai
A car stuck in Rain Water under Sanpada Subway during Heavy Rains in Navi Mumbai, India, on Tuesday, September 17, 2019.
A car stuck in Rain Water under Sanpada Subway during Heavy Rains in Navi Mumbai, India, on Tuesday, September 17, 2019. (Bachchan Kumar/ Hindustan Times)

Mumbai city and the adjoining areas are likely to witness “extremely heavy rainfall” on Thursday, said an IMD official.

The Indian Meteorological Department (IMD) forecasted heavy rainfall and has issued a red rain alert for Mumbai and Raigad districts. This indicates a precipitation of more than 204 mm in 24 hours starting Thursday morning.

However, Mumbai would receive heavy rainfall on Friday, but Raigad will continue to receive extremely heavy showers that day also, the official said.

Education minister Ashish Shelar has announced that all schools and junior colleges in Thane, Konkan and Mumbai region will remain shut as the weather department forecast a red alert in these regions. He also asked district collectors to keep an eye on the developments.

ashish shelar

@ShelarAshish

In view of heavy rainfall forecasts. As a precautionary measure, holiday is declared for all schools & junior colleges in Mumbai, Thane, Konkan region for today 19 Sep 2019. District collectors in other parts of Maharashtra to decide, based on local conditions.

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This monsoon continued to sweep away records after the city reported its wettest September ever on Wednesday, breaking a 65-year-old record. With another 12 days to go till the end of the month, Mumbai has received 984.3mm rain from September 1 to September 18.

First Published: Sep 19, 2019 07:06 IST

(Love Poem) High Winds

HIGH WINDS

 

Not tired so I decided to stay up a while tonight

No particular reason, just that I wished to tonight

About one A.M. I start to hear the high winds roll

Down the Pass straight to our home they blow

The house creaks and cracks to say it’s hello

 

Wife sound a sleep at the back-end of the house we share

Winds always bother her, she has lived in the alley of big blows

My lady had snoozed so I ushered her to bed about midnight

A big blow once picked up her car with her and her baby inside

It sat them back down on the highway, still unhurt and alive

 

Sweet dreams to my Lady, sleeping quietly tonight

Wrapped up with her Boo kitty all snuggled in tight

About five A.M. now, it think the big winds have died

Big winds can be so soothing, or a chill to your spine

Sleep well my Lady, the high winds meant nothing tonight

 

 

(Poem) Rain Drops Again, Evil Or Friend (#2)

Rain Drops Again, Evil Or Friend

 

Here in eastern Kentucky it has been quite wet

TV says in the north-east the water is running high

So hot and dry in Florida matchsticks run and hide

Jet-stream to low there yet here its way to high

 

Farmers look for spring moisture to bring the Earth alive

To much spring rain or a late freeze all their seeds will die

We all gotta have some water but not ever this damn high

Earth’s having it’s 10,000 year itch for us its quite a bitch

 

As the Earth’s Polar ends move turns out we must do so too

The Sahara is now the land of wheat, corn, soybeans and carrots

Now days in Nebraska and Kansas the sand dunes go for on for miles

Waking up to rain drops again was it a dream or beginning of the end

 

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