‘Miracle’ Excavation of ‘Little Foot’ Skeleton Reveals Mysterious Human Relative

Source: ‘Miracle’ Excavation of ‘Little Foot’ Skeleton Reveals Mysterious Human Relative

Oldest Human DNA from Africa Reveals Clues About a Mysterious Ancient Culture

Source: Oldest Human DNA from Africa Reveals Clues About a Mysterious Ancient Culture

10-Foot-Tall Stone Jars ‘Made by Giants’ Stored Human Bodies in Ancient Laos

Source: 10-Foot-Tall Stone Jars ‘Made by Giants’ Stored Human Bodies in Ancient Laos

Justin: Philosopher and Martyr.

Christian Classicist

If we are punished for the sake of our Lord Jesus Christ, we hope to be saved.

Justin lived and died in the second century, and was a hugely influential figure in the history of the church in Rome, just a generation or two after the teachings and imprisonment of Paul in the city.

Manuscripts that either describe Justin or record his writings, always give him the epithets ‘martyr’ or ‘philosopher’. This sums up what the man is best known for; as leader of a ‘school-church’ in Rome he was a philosopher, theologian and thinker, but in his death under the emperor Marcus Aurelius, we see the martyr.

Justin was born in AD 100, to a pagan family in the city of Flavia Neapolis. He was well educated, but describes in his own writings how he found the philosophies of the world to be hollow, unsatisfying, and inconclusive.

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Good old days!

Silent Songs of Sonsnow

Gones are good old days as he says
In many many different ways as she says
Where farmers had their seasonal songs to sing
and nomads had their seasonal space to swing,

Gones are good old days as he says
In many many different ways as she says
Where crops and barleys barely fails to yield
In the midst of many many large fields,

Gones are good old days as he says
In many many different ways as she says
Where all enjoy the warmth of winter Sun
With little tittle-tattles of so much fun,

Gones are good old days as he says
In many many different ways as she says
Where grannies go round and round the stupa
to earn their little last merit of Nangpa,

Gones are good old days as he says
In many many different ways as she says
where offerings and sacrifices are made in…

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Armed Forces Day – 18 May 2019

Pacific Paratrooper

18 MAY, 2019, BEING ANOTHER PART OF MILITARY APPRECIATION MONTH, IS CALLED ARMED FORCES DAY.

THE FIRST ARMED FORCES DAY WAS CELEBRATED 29 MAY 1950 (one month before the start of the Korean War).  ARMED FORCES WEEK BEGINS ON THE 2ND SATURDAY OF MAY AND ENDS THRU THE 3RD SATURDAY.  Due to their unique schedules, the NATIONAL GUARD & THE RESERVE units may celebrate this at any time during the month.

18 May 2019

PRESIDENT DWIGHT DAVID EISENHOWER, 1953 –  “Today let us, as Americans, honor the American fighting man.  For it is he or she – the soldier, the sailor, the Airman, the Marine – who has fought to preserve freedom.”

If you do NOT normally fly your flag everyday, make this day one that you do!  Even a small one sitting in your window shows your heartfelt feelings toward our troops.

If you are not from the U.S…

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Entweder Gehst Du oder Ich Gehe!

The Russian Reader

friedrichshain police state.JPGGermany has begun implementing the Putinist police state in parts of Berlin to make its Russian partners feel less lonely in their pursuit of absolute tyranny. Photo by the Russian Reader

Council of Europe and Russia Reach Tentative Compromise
Deutsche Welle
May 17, 2019

Russia said it had no desire to leave the Council of Europe and was ready to pay its dues following an apparent breakthrough between Moscow and Western nations. Russia’s delegation had faced sanctions over Crimea.

France and Germany pushed through a compromise that would allow Russia to return to the Council of Europe (CoE), as foreign ministers from the 47 member states resumed their two-day summit in Helsinki.

The Russian delegation has faced sanctions at the CoE over the annexation of Crimea by Russia in 2014. One of the measures included stripping Russia’s representatives of their voting rights, which in turn prompted them to boycott CoE…

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Croatia: Riding Through Another Red Storm

Croatia, the War, and the Future

Memorial plaque to 11 HOS defenders killed in Jasenovac in 1991Memorial plaque to 11 HOS
defenders killed in Jasenovac in 1991

It’s normal for Croatian public news agency HINA to report on news from Serbia and from everywhere, but as far as I’m concerned it’s not normal for the same agency to report or purport to report as news to the Croatian public the opinion emanating with hatred and lies and other depravities against Croatia coming out of anyone’s mouth let alone Serbian foreign minister Ivica Dacic’s. Serbian mainstream media does plenty of that on its own and its infuriating seeing Croatian public news agency pick up on the lies, repeat them – give them a kind of a credibility simply because they come in the form of news from a news agency. I don’t think any self-respecting Croat would want to have his/her face shoved into malicious garbage blowing from Serbia on New Year’s Eve, or at any time…

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Croatians Remember The Suffering and Victims of Communist Crimes

Croatia, the War, and the Future

When the Associated Press publishes an article regarding WWII Croatia and other world mainstream media such as New York Times shares it, you can safely bet your bottom dollar an evidently anti-Croatian independence biased journalist of Serbian extraction wrote the article. And so, on 17 May 2019, the world’s public has been served an article written by Dusan Stojanovic, “Croatia’s WWII Divisions in the Open as Merkel Visits”, not because of the need to acknowledge and respect WWII and post-WWII victims, no matter which side they were on during the war. The article is obviously served in order to prop-up anti-Croatian propaganda regarding victims without even blinking an eye at even the thought that the numbers of victims pinned to Croatian independence fight during WWII and blown out of every proportion, are in fact wrong and made up to no other end but to vilify the Croatian people…

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Don’t Kill the Messenger — Especially if He Comes from Genghis Khan

Commonplace Fun Facts

131-ft high statue of Genghis Khan in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia 131-ft high statue of Genghis Khan in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia

Haven’t heard of the Khwarezmian Empire? You can thank the unbelievably bad decisions of its leader, Shad Ala Ad-Din Muhammad II (1169-1220).

The Khwarezmian Empire stretched from the Sea of Oman to the Oxus River and encompassed what sociologists refer to as “Greater Iran,” incorporating parts of modern-day China, Iraq, Pakistan, and Afghanistan.

Genghis Khan came across Muhammad II’s territory and sent a delegation of Mongol and Muslim merchants to explore diplomatic and commercial possibilities. Muhammad, nervous over the real military skill of the Mongols and the exaggerated accounts of their brutality, arrested the merchants and seized their goods.

Khan, who was way more diplomatic than people generally gave him credit for, sent three envoys to Muhammad to offer him an easy out: blame the arrest of the merchants on a local governor, chop off his head, and move forward to…

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