It Is What ‘It’ Is

It Is What ‘It’ Is


Yes it is what it is but does that then depend on what ‘it’ is? ‘It’ could be like ‘truth’, does truth simply depend on whose version of it we seek? The ‘it’ of this note to you today is simply ‘life’. I have been blessed to have been given more than sixty years here upon this patch of ground and I have seen many a pretty locations here in the States and in Canada. I now only see them in my memories now as life and time have retired my roaming days. No amount of wanting to do things we used to do changes the fact that I am now a broken down old fart and my body just won’t let me do it. ‘It’ simply is like life itself, it is what it is, until we change it.


We can’t go back and change the mistakes of our past nor can we relive days of old with people we love who have moved on. If you are like me at all then you also have several points in times past where you wish you could change a decision you made in your personal life. One of the hard truths of life is that we can only go forward in life, we can not spin the globe counter clock wise. Having to live with the knowledge of our own mistakes is what tends to grow us as adults and as humans, or it can break us if we choose to let it. Depression can be the ‘it’ that destroys our lives some times, if we let ‘it’ controls us. Wine, women and song is said to destroy, but only if we let it. We humans are hopefully like a sponge, we learn everyday as we are made to go forward to learn from ‘it’, life, our mistakes, or our successes.


Race is a good example of ‘it is what it is’ I think for this demonstration of what I am trying to say. Race to me is nothing more than a skin color it is not a definition of a type of person or at least it should not be considered so. Race is what we as a society are choosing to let it be, good, evil, or something that completely does not matter. I am a white person who was born in the American south, these are facts that I had nothing to say about when they happened, no one else here on earth had anything to do with their two situation’s  either. Things that no one can control should not matter. Racism is something we can all control, if the color of a person is what is most important to you, you are poisoning your own soul and the lives of those around you. An example I am going to give right now is obviously just my own opinion but then again isn’t this what most (not all though) folks writing blogs are doing? If you are a person who believes that your race was treated wrong in the past or that you are not being treated as equals now have you now internally grown a hate filled soul? Have we become that which we have always hated in others? Our skin color is what it is. The rest of it, the hatred, the stupidity, these are ‘it’s’ that could be changed. That is if we will choose to accept the love of Jesus as our heart, mind and soul. If we choose not to, we cost us ‘it/our’ own soul, to be cast into hell forever. That is to high of a price for everyone and anyone to have to pay for ‘it/hate/racism/stupidity/ignorance’. We all either grow, we adapt, we learn to love, or we will end up dying twice. We all die one death, the second death is eternal separation from God our Father when we are cast away from Him into Hell. We all so very badly need to learn ‘IT’, ‘THE IT’ that is God’s love and to lose the hate that will only get us separated from God forever.


‘National Geographic’ Reckons With Its Past: ‘Our Coverage Was Racist’


((Commentary from: Oldpoet56) During my lifetime I probably read articles within National Geographic Magazines about a dozen times. Because I only read spot articles here and there I never realized that they had been this racist. Their history on race is disgusting, and this does disappoint me greatly. I do commend them though on finally recognizing this glaring fault and for having the guts to ‘call themselves out’ on this issue. Hopefully in their future they will eliminate this fault. I know that any of their magazines that I come across in the future I will be looking to see if their racism has stopped.)  

‘National Geographic’ Reckons With Its Past: ‘For Decades, Our Coverage Was Racist’

In a full-issue article on Australia that ran in National Geographic in 1916, aboriginal Australians were called “savages” who “rank lowest in intelligence of all human beings.” The magazine examines its history of racist coverage in its April issue.

C.P. Scott (L) and H.E. Gregory (R)/National Geographic

If National Geographic‘s April issue was going to be entirely devoted to the subject of race, the magazine decided it had better take a good hard look at its own history.

Editor in Chief Susan Goldberg asked John Edwin Mason, a professor of African history and the history of photography at the University of Virginia, to dive into the magazine’s nearly 130-year archive and report back.

What Mason found was a long tradition of racism in the magazine’s coverage: in its text, its choice of subjects, and in its famed photography.

Enlarge this image

The April issue of National Geographic is all about race.

National Geographic

“[U]ntil the 1970s National Geographic all but ignored people of color who lived in the United States, rarely acknowledging them beyond laborers or domestic workers,” writes Goldberg in the issue’s editor letter, where she discusses Mason’s findings. “Meanwhile it pictured ‘natives’ elsewhere as exotics, famously and frequently unclothed, happy hunters, noble savages—every type of cliché.”

Unlike magazines such as Life, National Geographic did little to push its readers beyond the stereotypes ingrained in white American culture,” Goldberg says, noting that she is the first woman and first Jewish person to helm the magazine – “two groups that also once faced discrimination here.”

To assess the magazine’s coverage historically, Mason delved into old issues and read a couple of key critical studies. He also pored over photographers’ contact sheets, giving him a view of not just the photos that made it into print, but also the decisions that photographers and editors made.

He saw a number of problematic themes emerge.

“The photography, like the articles, didn’t simply emphasize difference, but made difference … very exotic, very strange, and put difference into a hierarchy,” Mason tells NPR. “And that hierarchy was very clear: that the West, and especially the English-speaking world, was at the top of the hierarchy. And black and brown people were somewhere underneath.”

For much of its history, the pages of National Geographic depicted the Western world as dynamic, forward-moving and very rational. Meanwhile, Mason says, “the black and brown world was primitive and backwards and generally unchanging.”

One trope that he noticed time and again were photographs showing native people apparently fascinated by Westerners’ technology.

“It’s not simply that cameras and jeeps and airplanes are present,” he says. “It’s the people of color looking at this technology in amusement or bewilderment.” The implication was that Western readers would find humor in such fascination with their everyday goods.

Then there’s how the magazine chose its subject matter. Mason explains that National Geographic had an explicit editorial policy of “nothing unpleasant,” so readers rarely saw war, famine or civic conflict.

He points to an article on South Africa from the early 1960s that barely mentions the Sharpeville Massacre, in which 69 black South Africans were killed by police.

South African gold miners were “entranced by thundering drums” during “vigorous tribal dances,” a 1962 issue reported.

Kip Ross/National Geographic Creative

“There are no voices of black South Africans,” Mason told Goldberg. “That absence is as important as what is in there. The only black people are doing exotic dances … servants or workers. It’s bizarre, actually, to consider what the editors, writers, and photographers had to consciously not see.”

Then there’s the way women of color were often depicted in the magazine: topless.

“Teenage boys could always rely, in the ’50s and ’60s, on National Geographic to show them bare-breasted women as long as the women had brown or black skin,” Mason says. “I think the editors understood this was frankly a selling point to its male readers. Some of the bare-breasted young women are shot in a way that almost resembles glamour shots.”

Mason says the magazine has been dealing with its history implicitly for the last two or three decades, but what made this project different is that Goldberg wanted to make reckoning explicit — “That National Geographic should not do an issue on race without understanding its own complicity in shaping understandings of race and racial hierarchy.”

Although slave labor was used to build homes featured in a 1956 article, the writer contended that they “stand for a chapter of this country’s history every American is proud to remember.”

Robert F. Sisson and Donald McBain/National Geographic

For those of us who have spent long afternoons thumbing old issues of the magazine and dreaming of far-off lands, Mason wants to make clear that looking at foreign people and places isn’t a bad thing.

“We’re all curious and we all want to see. I’m not criticizing the idea of being curious about the world. It’s just the other messages that are sent—that it’s not just difference, but inferiority and superiority.”

So where does the storied publication go from here?

One good step would be to invite the diverse contributors to the April issue to become part of the magazine’s regular pool of writers and photographers, Mason suggests.

“Still it’s too often a Westerner who is telling us about Africa or Asia or Latin America,” he says. “There are astonishing photographers from all over the world who have unique visions – not just of their own country, but who could bring a unique vision to photographing Cincinnati, Ohio, if it came to that.”

He notes that the magazine’s images have so often captivated, even when they were stereotypical or skewed. Mason says a number of African photographers have told him that it was magazines like National Geographic and Life that turned them onto photography in the first place.

“They knew that there were problems with the way that they and their people were being represented,” he says. “And yet the photography was often spectacularly good, it was really inviting, and it carried this power. And as young people, these men and women said, I want to do that. I want to make pictures like that.”

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Is U.S. Government Sanctioned Monthly Racism A Good Idea

Is U.S. Government Sanctioned Monthly Racism A Good Idea


For those of you who do not know me, I am a person that despises all forms of racism. I believe that it is a sin against God and man, one that will definitely get the possessor of this dark heart condemned at their Judgement after their death. I do not wish for anyone to be condemned to the fires of Hell and I am very thankful that I am not the one who has to make such a judgement. Scripture tells us that “he who hates his brother without a cause is condemned already”. Scripture is very plain that we are all brothers in God’s eyes and if I hate anyone because of something that they have absolutely no say so in like what color our skin is when we come out of the womb, then we are sinning against God and man. If I, you, or anyone else hates another because of what skin color they happen to be then we are an empty shell, we are dead though we live, we are just fodder for the fires of Hell. “If we say we love God, but hate our own brother then we are a liar”, so says the Apostle Paul.


I am old and disabled and no longer able to be out in the work force but I would like you to think about where you work or of places you have worked in your past okay. If you are employed in a factory or office of some kind and the company has a policy where if you are lets say a Hispanic person that you are given the first Monday of each month off with pay what would you think about that? I would bet that most people, if they are Hispanic, would think, hey cool. But, what if you work in that factory and you are not Hispanic and the company had no like policy for all of its other workers, what would you think about their policy then? Should not the company be required by some kind of a law to either not allow the Hispanic employees this recognition or at least to have a like policy for all of the other employees and their nationalities? If not, wouldn’t you feel like the company was being racist for the Hispanic employees, or maybe it should be considered as a racist employer against you because you are not Hispanic? In a case like this wouldn’t you think that the ACLU and other legal entities including the Federal Department of Justice would be suing the company and its top brass?


What if the Hispanic employees got all mad at you, making physical and verbal threats toward you because you wanted to have a paid day off each month because you are, let us say, an American Indian, or maybe Oriental, or how about a mutt like me (I’m at least four mixtures of blood)? What if you were being called a racist by a lot of your Hispanic coworkers because you wanted the same rights to the same recognition that they receive? Who do you think is the real racists? When we as a company or as a Nation divide ourselves into race classes all we do is cause hurt feeling and or anger! Since the beginning of the Human Race any military leader knows that one of the best ways to defeat a tribe, city, or nation, is to divide its people. Divide and conquer, certainly you have heard of this strategy since grade school Social Studies classes haven’t you? The reason this strategy has continued to this day on the battle field is because it works!


If we as a Nation designate let us say, one particular month as special for just one of the many races within that Nation, then why would it be wrong to not make all twelve months designated as a special month for the different races? Would that be racist against that one race of people who already had a designated “special month’?  Why would that one race of people scream racism at everyone else for them getting a “special month” designated to them each year? Honestly, I can really only think of one legitimate reason, they need to seriously look in a mirror when they are wanting to find someone to call a racist!


I really don’t have as big a problem with a “special month each year” being so designated as long as all people’s of your Nation also have such a designation. But honestly, it is probably better if no special attention is paid toward one race of people at all because it does divide and cause more race issue problems then what it could ever help in making things better. But, if our Nation does insist on this dividing policy then at least that one race that gets its own month each year really needs to quit calling other people a racist because they want exactly the same thing for their race. If a Nation is to be strong it needs to be One People, the policy or way of thinking that people should be “equal but separate” not only condemns their own Nation to collapse, they condemn their own Souls to the Fires of Hell along with their racist ideology.


As A Race (Human) We Are Sick And Pathetic

As A Race (Human) We Are Sick And Pathetic


I have a question for each and every one of you, are you sick yet? There’s a lot of different kinds of sick as we all know even if we are just speaking of viral which I am not. I am speaking about the soul of the human race, and this is also an issue in itself, believe it or not. Just in case your brain threw up a question mark, I do mean that there are billions of people who either believe that this life is all there is, so they have no concern for anyone else’s tomorrows because they do not believe in the concept of Souls. But you know what is worse than this line of thought? There are many people who do not believe that everyone is even worthy of being considered as a human being.


I like almost all of us do believe in their being such a thing as an all-powerful Creator of all things, a Master Deity. I have learned through study, witnessing, and listening that people consider people who are different from themselves in some way to be inferior to themselves, even Soulless. How do you think it was considered by the US Federal government from Andrew Jackson through General Grant to remove or wipe off the map the Indian People, they were “soulless savages” don’t you see? How did those who considered themselves to be “people of God” decide it was okay to enslave “by race”? Slavery has been a sickening reality world-wide since the invention of ego and hate, other words, for a very long time. Slavery, indentured or other wise is a heart breaking thing even when it is all about the financial aspects. In the Americas Europeans tried first to enslave the original continents populations and when that didn’t work out so well the slave trade in Africans blossomed. It is an unfortunate sickening reality an estimated 35,000,000 people live as slaves right now, today. (very recent UN stat). But if you are an African or a black American you are not a slave here in this country because of your skin color nor do you even know or have met anyone for those reasons that was ever a ‘legal’ slave. People must all quit the slave mentality and start from this second forward to start treating absolutely everyone as an equal human being. I know, it’s not going to happen, we as a human race are just to hate filled and stupid to act toward each other as God instructed us to do.


The human race is very sick today, all around the world you see pure hate. People violently oppressing others because of not only skin color or religion but over things like what country they were born in (like anyone had an option in that decision) or even what part of their own country a person is from. We have always had the financial problems between people who use  wealth to hate against the ones who have more than you, or hate towards people who are financially poorer than you. Hate goes in every direction if we let it, including to the depths of our hearts and souls.


Most all of us have come to realize that people in general do not like to be told what we have to do by people who don’t live by the same codes they choose to enforce upon others. Here I am speaking directly to and about government officials at every single level there is, every department. Presidents to Congress to the VA to Social Security personnel to each and every single law enforcement officer. People at times, sometimes a lot, abuse their positions as “our public servants”. I may have just angered a lot of police officers, so be it, but chill out for a moment. Are you a human being? Then you have erred in judgement at points in your life, and in your job, we all have. None of us are perfect. But, how bad some people in every walk of life choose to carry their ego toward others must improve and the only human way to do that is from inside of our own human brain, heart, and soul.


Police and politicians when they are evil or just simply mistake prone these faults are put up in lights for all to see. I spent almost all of my adult life behind the wheel of a semi tractor-trailer unit, when you make a mistake while behind the wheel, you stand out more in a crowd. Flying, it is said is much safer than driving our nations roadways, and I do agree with that, fewer idiots (people who have no clue what they are really doing). But, and a huge but, let the pilot mess up, and the whole world will know your name and face in less than a day.

Now I have seen and known many good law enforcement officers, but I have also know several that I would not trust with anything especially authority or a firearm. This situation in Ferguson MO where an officer shot and killed that young man of another race shows many acidic flaws in Americas underbelly. Of course the race issue, it always seems to be a race issue in this country when a white officer shoots a non white, especially if that person was black. Yet when a black officer shoots non black people our main stream media runs and hide. How do we here in America want our Law Enforcement Departments to perform their duties in regard to the race issue? Do we require that only white Officers are allowed to interact with the white people and only black Officers to interact with the black population as well as all the other races? Meaning in like manner that each race only enforces the laws of ethnicity?  You know what I mean, Hispanic toward only Hispanic, Indian only toward Indian and so on?


I do not know first hand exactly what all the events were in the Ferguson case, I wasn’t there, I didn’t see it. Here we must put our trust in the fact that God knows exactly what happened, exactly what was going through each mans mind. I do not want to sit in judgement of any other person, I have to many sins of my own. I do agree that after God that our next option is we have to trust the people in our legal system to be above corruption of bank account or mind. We all know that at times the human factor slaps us with the reality that some of these humans are in need of being replaced from their positions of authority. But, we as a human race here in America and around the world must do it without any violence when at all possible. No one ever has the right to be an aggressor toward another person, everyone has the right to defend themselves when being attacked, but only then. If there are no aggressors, there is no need for conflict. No violence here is except-able, and we can remove some of these people at the ballot box. Police departments, police your own in total honesty. Families, police your own, try your very best to be a positive light to the ones in your own home. Please pray for all the violence in your own communities, in your own families to totally cease. Unless we are just totally ignorant we had better realize that the Spirit of God sees everything, and He knows our every thought. He knows why we do what we do, there is no BS-ing our Creator, He knows exactly what the truth is and the truth is what He will judge every one of us on.

Is Black History Month Simply Racists?



I hope that you noticed that I posed this title as a question and not as a statement. I am going to be posing this article in questioning form, I am trying to get all of us to think, to look inside ourselves to discover, what do we think about these questions. First let us start with Black History Month, is its whole concept derived off of racism? Are the politicians, mostly the Democrats simply bowing down to a group of people who normally vote about 90% for Democrats? Why is there only one non-politician (Doctor Martin Luther King Jr.) who has their birthday as a Federal Holiday? Is it because he was a Black man? In all of U.S. history is Doctor King the only person who really stands out as a special human being deserving of having a Federal Holiday in honor of them? Personally I am in favor of Doctor King being honored in this way, I feel that the man deserves it, but aren’t there others, is he the only one?


I have seen in the past when a business celebrates a certain ethnic day, where the company lets a certain group of their employees get the day off or throw a special lunching for just one ethnic group, it causes a lot of friction within the rank and file of their employees. To me, if we are going to do such things as a Nation then we need to vastly expand it, or end it all together. Just as there are institutions within the Black community where we have organizations like the NAACP, the Negro College Fund, Black Colleges, Black Miss America, shouldn’t we also have things like this for all of the other nationalities? Doesn’t it have to be all or none? What would be wrong with the National Association For The Advancement of Oriental People, Hispanic People or European People? Would that be racists? If we had the National White College Fund or the White Miss America Pageant, or Miss Oriental Miss America Pageant or how about the Hispanic College Fund, are these ideas racists? Is the concept of Nation Indian American Pageant or Indian College Fund racists?


When it is only one group which is based on skin color, to me it sure looks like the pure definition of racism. What makes it worse is when you have so-called Leaders of that Nationality group who do things like deny that the Holocaust ever happened because they want to say that they, their group, their ethnicity, is the only group that has ever been treated horribly, folks, that is racism. Should we as a Nation honor the other Nationalities? Should March be National Arab Month? Should April be National Persian Month? May National Hispanic Month? The list could go on and on, should we as a Nation do this? Should the same things be evaluated concerning the Colleges and College funds? The Miss America Pageant, should we have one for every race, for every mixed race? As I said, this article today is posed as a question to you, to get us all to think, what is okay, what is racist, what should we as a Nation say yes or no to? If you would, please leave me your thoughts in the comment section, I always do my best to answer all comments within 24 hours when ever possible. Thank you for the kindness of your time, I appreciate you stopping in.



Why Carter G. Woodson Is the ‘Father of Black History’





Updated: February 1, 2018 11:24 AM ET

February is Black History Month, and Google is kicking it off by honoring Carter G. Woodson, frequently touted as the “Father of Black History,” with a Google Doodle.

Carter Godwin Woodson was born in 1875 to former slaves and, as the second African-American to earn a doctorate from Harvard, become one of the first scholars of African-American history. Woodson died in 1950.

Illustrator Shannon Wright designed the Google Doodle in conjunction with the Black Googlers network.

“Woodson was committed to bringing African-American history front and center and ensuring it was taught in schools and studied by other scholars,” Sherice Torres, Director of Brand Marketing at Google and member of the network, explained in a post about the Google Doodle. Torres explained that Woodson served as her inspiration when she said she wanted to attend Harvard and was discouraged by people around her.

Portrait of American historian and educator Carter Godwin Woodson (1875 - 1950), 1910s. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Portrait of American historian and educator Carter Godwin Woodson (1875 – 1950), 1910s. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)
Hulton Archive—Getty Images

Here’s What Else You Should Know About Carter Woodson:

  • Woodson was unable to attend school for much of his childhood because he had to help his parents financially. He ended up entering high school at the age of 20, and received his diploma in two years.
  • After high school,Woodson taught in West Virginia before earning his undergraduate degree at Berea College. He received a masters degree from the University of Chicago in 1908, and a doctorate of History from Harvard in 1912.
  • In between teaching and receiving his masters and doctorate, Woodson was a school supervisor in the Philippines.
  • Woodson founded “Negro History Week,” which preceded Black History Month.


(Reality Poem) The Trump Wall

The Trump Wall

Why do you build this wall, is it to keep others out

Was not Berlin’s built built to keep their people in

The Great Wall of China can be seen from space

Decide what is real, is it safety or Race you fear

Your reflection shines in the world’s looking glass

Does it show but one face or your dad’s white cape

Division from the south, but not from the north

Do you not see your two faces as they’re shining

What do you think this wall of your’s will facilitate

The poor of the south do not bring you wealth to take

Hungry, tired, and scared, they come to your gates

Looking for a safe place to build, to work and to pray

You build a higher wall and tell them they have to wait

From terrorist and drugs, you say your wall will defend

Yet you wall out your brother, your neighbor, your friends

How can you be so cold, do you not know, nor see, nor care

By your actions you do offend all that is good in God’s Grace

Do you not think that a terrorist or a drug King Pin

Can enter your haven from the cold frozen North

Do not speak to me of family values you hypocrite

As children and mothers die of hunger and disease

At the foot of this wall you show your self-righteousness!

(Biblical Poem) Ezra 9-Lamentation Of The Man: Ezra

Lamentation of the Man: Ezra


When he heard The Royal Seed, dirtied

Hair from his head and his beard he pulled

Astonished and confused by the people’s lost faith

The Holy Seed contaminated, defiled, mixed blood

We have taken of their daughters and they our sons


Trying to get the faithless to understand and to see

Grace from G-d, His promise: to save, some of us

Do we have a nail hold in understanding of the Holy Crown

Great Grace has been given to us: yet we mostly choose to fail

Hebrew Theology the Lamentation of Ezra: The Man, Chapter 9

African nations slam Trump’s vulgar remarks



African nations slam Trump’s vulgar remarks as ‘reprehensible and racist’

The wave of international outrage grew Saturday against the vulgar language President Donald Trump used when referring to immigration from African nations, with Ghana’s president saying he would “not accept such insults, even from a leader of a friendly country, no matter how powerful.”

President Nana Akufo-Addo tweeted an unflinching defense of the African continent — and of Haiti and El Salvador, countries also mentioned during a meeting Thursday between Trump and a bipartisan group of senators at the White House.

Trump repeatedly referred to African nations in general as “shithole countries,”according to Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., and also reportedly asked why the United States needs more Haitian immigrants instead of people from countries such as Norway.

In response, Akufo-Addo tweeted: “We are certainly not a ‘shithole country.'”

The language of @realDonaldTrump that the African continent, Haiti and El Salvador are “shithole countries” is extremely unfortunate. We are certainly not a “shithole country”. We will not accept such insults, even from a leader of a friendly country, no matter how powerful.

The White House did not initially deny Trump made those remarks. But as the controversy grew — with some members of Congress slamming the remarks as racist — the president on Friday responded in a tweet that the “language used by me at the … meeting was tough, but this was not the language used.”

Trump has not further clarified the statements attributed to him, and on Friday ignored questions reporters asked about it after he signed a proclamation honoring Martin Luther King Jr.

Related: In Norway, Trump’s comments on immigration rejected as backhanded praise

Meanwhile, the condemnation has been swift. In addition to Ghana, the government of Botswana said Trump’s language is “reprehensible and racist,” and said it has summoned the U.S. ambassador to clarify what he meant.

Senegal’s president, Macky Sall, said in a statement that it was “shocked” and that “Africa and the black race merit the respect and consideration of all.” His West African nation has long been lauded by the U.S. as an example of a stable democracy on the continent.


 Is Donald Trump a racist? President faces backlash over vulgar comments 2:45

The African Union, which is made up of 55 member states, also took issue with Trump’s remarks.

“Given the historical reality of how many Africans arrived in the United States as slaves, this statement flies in the face of all accepted behavior and practice,” said spokeswoman Ebba Kalondo.

Paul Altidor, Haiti’s ambassador to the U.S., called Trump’s comments “regrettable” and based on “clichés and stereotypes rather than actual fact.” He also noted the insensitivity of its timing, coming the same week as the eighth anniversary of Haiti’s 2010 earthquake, which killed more than 200,000 people.

El Salvador’s government on Friday sent a formal letter of protest to the United States over the “harsh terms detrimental to the dignity of El Salvador and other countries.”

Trump has previously felt backlash over disparaging remarks about immigrants, most notably on the campaign trail when he characterized Mexicans as “rapists” and “criminals.”

The New York Times first reported in December that Trump said Haitian immigrants “all have AIDS” during a summer 2017 meeting about immigration. At that same meeting, he also complained that Nigerian immigrants who come to the United States would never want to “go back to their huts.”

The White House denied Trump ever used the words “AIDS” or “huts.”


 ‘They’re rapists…all have AIDS’: Some of Trump’s comments on immigrants, minorities 3:50

Trump’s apparent struggle with racial insensitivity also surfaced last fall. At the time, he asked a career intelligence analyst where she was from, and after learning she was of Korean heritage, asked why the “pretty Korean lady” isn’t negotiating with North Korea on his administration’s behalf, two officials with direct knowledge of the exchange told NBC News on Friday.

Trump’s remarks have prompted two top House Democrats to announce the introduction next week of a censure resolution of Trump.

Rep. Cedric Richmond, D-La., the chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, and Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., said in a joint statement Friday that they were “deeply disturbed and offended” by the language.

Organizing a formal reprimand of Trump would be difficult since it will require getting bipartisan support in a GOP-controlled House. The censuring of a president is also rare, and was only done once by the Senate against Andrew Jackson in 1834 for his failure to turn over certain documents.

These ‘Shithole Countries’ Have a Message for President Trump





Updated: January 12, 2018 11:45 AM ET

President Donald Trump reportedly singled out Haiti, El Salvador and parts of Africa as “shithole countries” during a rant about immigration Thursday. Those places aren’t happy

Trump’s comments came during a meeting with lawmakers at the White House held to reach a bipartisan immigration deal, according to the Washington Postwhich broke the news. Sources familiar with the meeting told the Post that the president was amenable to more immigrants from Norway and Asia, whom he says help the country economically, but wondered aloud “why are we having all these people from shithole countries come here?”

According to the Post, Trump also said, “Why do we need more Haitians? Take them out.”

On Friday morning Trump posted a series of tweets about the immigration deal in which he appeared to deny he said “shithole countries.”

“The language used by me at the DACA meeting was tough, but this was not the language used. What was really tough was the outlandish proposal made – a big setback for DACA!” he wrote.

In a second tweet, sent around two hours after the first, Trump said that he “never said anything derogatory about Haitians other than Haiti is, obviously, a very poor and troubled country” and that he never uttered the phrase “take them out.”

Trump also claimed that the accusation was “made up” by members of the Democratic Party. “I have a wonderful relationship with Haitians,” he added. “Probably should record future meetings – unfortunately, no trust!”

However, the White House on Thursday did not deny the Post’s report about Trump’s language.

A spokesman for the United Nations said Friday that Trump’s reported words were racist.

“There is no other word one can use but ‘racist’… This isn’t just a story about vulgar language, it’s about opening the door to humanity’s worst side, about validating and encouraging racism and xenophobia,” United Nations human rights spokesman Rupert Colville said. “You cannot dismiss entire countries and continents as ‘shitholes’, whose entire populations, who are not white, are therefore not welcome.”

Here’s how Trump’s alleged “shithole countries” are responding to the remarks:


CBS News reports that the Haitian government promptly summoned charge d’affairs Robin Diallo, the top U.S. diplomat in the country, to respond to the comments.

Former Haitian Prime Minister Laurent Lamothe tweeted, “SHAME ON TRUMP! The world is witnessing a new low today with this #ShitholeNations remark! totally unacceptable! uncalled for moreover it shows a lack a respect and IGNORANCE never seen before in the recent history of the US by any President! Enough is enough!!”

The Haitian government said in a statement “these insulting and reprehensible statements in no way reflect the virtues of wisdom, restraint and discernment that must be cultivated by any high political authority,” according to the Associated Press, adding that the comment “reflects a totally erroneous and racist view of the Haitian community and its contribution to the United States.”

Other Haitians took to social media to share pictures of their nation’s beautiful beaches to make a point about the president’s alleged remarks.

El Salvador

Hugo Martinez, El Salvador’s foreign minister, tweeted calling on the U.S. government to confirm or deny Trump’s statements. In subsequent tweets, he noted that a number of individuals who helped rebuild New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina were from El Salvador and saying that he “feels proud to be Salvadoran.”

Jean Manes, the U.S. envoy to El Salvador, tweeted that the United States “values the friendship and the relationship with the Salvadoran people.” Manes added that she has had “the privilege to travel around this beautiful country and meet thousands of Salvadorans,” and that it is “an honor” to live and work there.”

African Union

The African Union responded to the reported remarks by pointing out many Africans arrived in the U.S. as slaves.

“Given the historical reality of how many Africans arrived in the United States as slaves, this statement flies in the face of all accepted behavior and practice,” Ebba Kalondo, a spokesperson for the 55-nation African Union, told the Associated Press. “This is particularly surprising as the United States of America remains a global example of how migration gave birth to a nation built on strong values of diversity and opportunity.”

Leanne Manas, a news anchor for the South African Broadcasting Corporation, tweeted Friday morning, “Good morning from the greatest most beautiful “shithole country” in the world!!!”

Somali information minister Abdirahman Omar Osman told CNN, “If it’s real, it doesn’t need a response. Those comments do not deserve a response.”

Mmusi Maimane, the leader of South Africa’s opposition Democratic Alliance party, described Trump’s comments as “abhorrent” on Twitter. His tweet continued: “He confirms a patronizing view of Africa and promotes a racist agenda. Africa/U.S. relations will take strain from this, with a leader who has failed to reconcile humanity. The hatred of Obama’s roots now extends to an entire continent.”


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