‘I Just Closed My Eyes.’ 25 People Shot in Little Rock Nightclub

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME and THE ASSOCIATED PRESS)

‘I Just Closed My Eyes.’ 25 People Shot in Nightclub

Updated: 3:45 PM ET | Originally published: 7:42 AM ET

(LITTLE ROCK, Ark.) — Clubgoers screamed and scrambled for cover as dozens of gunshots rang out during a rap concert in downtown Little Rock early Saturday, leaving 25 people shot and three others injured from an 11-second melee that police quickly said was not related to terrorism.

All of the victims were expected to survive the shooting at the Power Ultra Lounge, about a mile (1.6 kilometers) from the state Capitol building. Police believe the gunfire erupted amid a dispute among clubgoers and that multiple people fired shots. Twenty-five people suffered gunshot wounds, and three others had unrelated injuries.

“I just closed my eyes, got down on the ground and put my hands on my head,” Courtney Swanigan, 23, told The Associated Press.

The shooting capped a violent week in Arkansas’ largest city. Police had responded to a dozen drive-by shootings over the previous nine days but haven’t said whether any of the incidents are related.

“Little Rock’s crime problem appears to be intensifying,” Republican Gov. Asa Hutchinson said in a statement. “Every few days it seems a high-profile shooting dominates the news, culminating with this morning’s event. I have spoken this morning with Mayor (Mark) Stodola and I have offered both my heart felt concern over this senseless violent tragedy and state assets as needed to address the continued threat of violence in our community.”

Facebook video posted from inside the club included audio of at least 24 rounds fired in about 11 seconds. Darryl Rankin, who posted the video, said a friend of his who attended the Finese 2Tymes concert with him had a bullet “stuck in his spine.”

Police were summoned about 2:30 a.m. City police said quickly that the agency did not believe the shooting was part of a terrorist attack and that no active shooter remained at the scene.

“Some sort of dispute broke out between people inside,” Police Chief Kenton Buckner told reporters.

Little Rock Mayor Mark Stodola said more information would be released at a news conference Saturday afternoon.

The club’s Facebook page promoted Friday night’s show with a poster depicting a man pointing what appears to be a gun at the camera. Calls to a number listed for Finese 2Tymes’ booking agent wasn’t returned Saturday, but a message was posted on the artist’s Facebook page offering thoughts and prayers for those injured: “THE VIOLENCE IS NOT FOR THE CLUB PEOPLE. WE ALL COME WITH 1 MOTIVE AT THE END OF THE DAY, AND THATS TO HAVE FUN.”

Police cordoned off the area as technicians collected evidence from the scene, which near a Roman Catholic cathedral and a First United Methodist Church center. A number of worshippers gathered for a funeral at St. Andrew’s while police still worked the scene.

Glass from the Power Ultra Lounge’s second story windows littered the ground, along with empty drink cups. In the parking lot, a silver Toyota had what appeared to be a streak of blood on the front passenger-side door.

“I’m sick of all the killing and I’m tired of all the shooting. The kids getting hurt,” said Raida Bunche, who was waiting outside the club after hearing from a friend that her son had been inside. She found out later that he had run from the club when the shooting started and was not hurt.

Arkansas Alcoholic Beverage Control officials suspended the club’s alcohol license and set a hearing for July 10 on three potential charges: disorderly conduct, allowing possession of weapons on the premises and “failure to be a good neighbor.”

The club’s license has been suspended 11 times for failing to pay taxes, and it has been cited seven times for 14 various violations including unknowingly furnishing alcohol to minors and allowing alcohol to leave the premises since 2012, ABC Director of Enforcement Boyce Hamlet said.

In May, one person was killed and six people were hurt in a mass shooting at a downtown concert in Jonesboro, Arkansas, about 115 miles (185 kilometers) northeast of Little Rock. In that case, two men were charged with first-degree murder and six counts of first-degree battery.

Arkansas lawmakers earlier this year approved a measure expanding where concealed handguns can be carried, including bars if allowed by owners, for licensees who undergo additional training. The law takes effect in September, but the training likely won’t be available until early next year.

Multiple People Have Been Shot Inside Bronx-Lebanon Hospital Per NYPD

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

Four to six people were believed to be wounded on Friday in a shooting at Bronx-Lebanon Hospital in New York, according to a New York Police Department spokeswoman.

A shooter is dead at the hospital, according to a tweet from NYPD Assistant Commissioner for Communication & Public Information J. Peter Donald.
Police have no confirmed information on the number of people injured or their conditions, said NYPD spokeswoman Annette Shelton.
The shooter is believed to be a former hospital employee, local law enforcement officials told CNN.
The NYPD has advised people to avoid the area.
New York Mayor Bill de Blasio has been briefed on the unfolding situation, according to a tweet from the mayor’s office.
The Bronx-Lebanon Hospital in the Bronx borough is among the largest providers of outpatient services in New York.

Police Searches Drop Dramatically in States that Legalized Marijuana

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NBC NEWS)

Police Searches Drop Dramatically in States that Legalized Marijuana

Traffic searches by highway patrols in Colorado and Washington dropped by nearly half after the two states legalized marijuana in 2012. That also reduced the racial disparities in the stops, according to a new analysis of police data, but not by much. Blacks and Hispanics are still searched at higher rates than whites.

Highway stops have long been a tool in the war on drugs, and remain a charged issue amid a furious national debate about police treatment of minorities. Last week, protests erupted over the acquittal of a Minnesota police officer who shot to death Philando Castile after pulling him over for a broken tail light.

Sam Petulla

The overuse of traffic stops can damage the public trust in police, particularly when searches disproportionately involve black and Hispanic drivers.

“Searches where you don’t find something are really negative towards a community,” said Jack McDevitt, director of Northeastern University’s Institute on Race and Justice in Boston. “Have a police officer search your car is really like, ‘Why are they doing this to me?’ And you get more pissed off. If you’re trying to do relationship building, it’s not a good thing to do a lot of searches.”

Sam Petulla

The analysis comes from data crunched by the Stanford Open Policing Project, a team of researchers and statisticians that collected more than 60 million records of traffic stops and searches by highway patrol officers in 22 states. By sharing the data, the group aims to promote a deeper understanding of the patterns and motivations behind the most common interaction Americans have with police.

The data compiled by the Stanford group is limited in that it is not uniform across states. Each of the country’s law enforcement agencies track traffic stops differently, and some don’t release the data publicly. In the end, the group compiled data from 20 states that was deep enough to allow a rigorous analysis. Colorado and Washington were compared against 12 of these states to arrive at the conclusion that marijuana legalization likely had an effect on search rates.

In both states, marijuana legalization eliminated one of the major justifications used by police officers to stop motorists, cutting searches by more than 40 percent after legalization. In Colorado, the change occurred gradually, with searches dropping initially by 30 percent, and then flatting out to a more than 50-percent drop within a year.

In Washington, there was a drop of more than 50 percent in searches within three months of legalization. The search rate remained low thereafter. The 12 states in the Stanford study that did not pass marijuana decriminalization legislation during the period did not experience significant drops.

The biggest finding ─ and one that mirrors the results of investigations in individual states and jurisdictions ─ is that minorities are still stopped and searched at higher rates than white drivers. The threshold before a search is performed is also lower for minority drivers than it is for whites, according to the researchers at Stanford behind the Open Policing Project.

Those differences remained in Colorado and Washington even after searchers dropped following pot legalization.

Jack Glaser, a professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley, said that although the disparities persisted, the overall drop in searches means that fewer minorities would be unfairly targeted.

“As long as police officers (like the rest of us) hold implicit or explicit stereotypes associating minorities with crime, they will perceive minorities as more suspicious,” Glaser wrote in an email.

In both states, the analysis excludes searches incident to an arrest. Those searches are not a good barometer for the searches officers conduct after making a stop at their own discretion, the researchers said.

Seattle Police Fatally Shoot Pregnant Woman Armed With Knife: Had Tasers, Didn’t Use Them

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME.COM)

Seattle Police Fatally Shoot Pregnant Woman Armed With Knife

11:52 AM ET
Seattle police on Sunday fatally shot a woman who authorities say was armed with a knife. The 30-year-old woman, identified by relatives as Charleena Lyles, was killed after she confronted officers who were inside her home responding to a burglary call, authorities said.

Lyles’ relatives said she was pregnant and had mental health issues. Police had previously responded to an incident at her home in which she “presented an increased risk to officers.” Because of that history, two officers, instead of one, were dispatched in response to the burglary call on Sunday, authorities said.

Audio released Monday by the Seattle Police Department depicts an encounter that quickly escalated into violence. Two police officers can be heard having a calm exchange with Lyles, who details how someone broke into her home and stole some items, including a video game console. About two minutes into the exchange, at least one of the officers shouts, “Get back! Get back!”

“We need help,” an officer says.

A female voice in the background utters an expletive as the officers repeatedly warn her to back away. Multiple shots are then fired.

Police said both officers opened fire when the woman, whom they have not formally identified, confronted them “armed with a knife.” It’s unclear what prompted her to pick up the weapon.

Lyles’ family said at a Sunday night vigil that the officers did not need to shoot. Lyles was several months pregnant and had been battling “mental health problems” for at least the last year, according to the Seattle Times.

Her sister, Monika Williams, told the newspaper Lyles was petite and that the officers could have found a different way to respond to a threat. “Why couldn’t they have Tased her? They could have taken her down. I could have taken her down,” Williams said, overcome with emotion.

“There’s no reason for her to be shot in front of her babies,” Williams shouted. “The Seattle police shot the wrong one today.”

There were several young children inside the apartment at the time of the shooting, shortly before 10 a.m., police said. None of them was injured.

Seattle police said both officers were equipped with less lethal force options. The incident is under investigation. The two officers involved, whom police have not named, will be placed on paid administrative leave, Seattle police said.

One officer is an 11-year veteran of the police force while the other is newer to the department, Seattle Police Department North Precinct captain Sean O’Donnell told the Times.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray called the incident a “tragedy for all involved.”

Republican House whip Steve Scalise shot in Virginia shooting

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

Republican House whip Steve Scalise shot in Virginia shooting

Story highlights

  • The shooting appears to be a “deliberate attack,” sources tell CNN
  • Scalise is the first member of Congress to be shot since former Arizona Rep. Gabby Giffords

Washington (CNN) Rep. Steve Scalise was shot Wednesday morning in Alexandria, Virginia, a House colleague told CNN, in what sources are calling an apparent “deliberate attack.”

The shooting took place at a practice for the GOP congressional baseball team.
Scalise, a member of the House Republican leadership as the majority whip, appeared to have been shot in the hip and it appeared two Capitol Hill police agents were shot, according to Rep. Mo Brooks, who told CNN he was on deck when the shooting occurred.
According to both congressional and law enforcement sources, the shooting appears to be a “deliberate attack.”
Two law enforcement sources told CNN the shooter, who is in police custody, has been taken to a hospital.
Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, who was at the practice, told CNN “it would have been a massacre” had Capitol Police not been present.
“Nobody would have survived without the Capitol Hill police,” Paul said on CNN. “It would have been a massacre without them.”
Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake added that he saw a member of Scalise’s security detail return fire on the gunman for what felt like 10 minutes, even though the police officer was wounded in the leg.
“50 (shots) would be an understatement, I’m quite sure,” Flake said when asked about the total amount of gunfire, including police returning fire.
Flake said two members of Scalise’s security detail were wounded, and another man was wounded in the chest.
Once they were able, Flake said he and Rep. Brad Wenstrup, who is a physician, went out to where Scalise was lying after dragging himself away from the shooting to apply pressure to the wound. Scalise was coherent the whole time, Flake said.
The President is monitoring the situation, the White House said in a statement.
“The Vice President and I are aware of the shooting incident in Virginia and are monitoring developments closely,” President Donald Trump said in a statement. “We are deeply saddened by this tragedy. Our thoughts and prayers are with the members of Congress, their staffs, Capitol Police, first responders, and all others affected.”
Trump subsequently tweeted, “Rep. Steve Scalise of Louisiana, a true friend and patriot, was badly injured but will fully recover. Our thoughts and prayers are with him.”
House Speaker Paul Ryan and Republican Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy are safe on Capitol Hill and receiving updates, aides tell CNN. Neither was at the practice.
Brooks said there were a number of congressmen and congressional staffers lying on the ground, and at least one of them was wounded. The Alabama Republican said he used his belt as a tourniquet to help one of the victims.
He said the shooter appeared to be a white male but added that “I saw him for a second or two.” He said the shooter was behind the third base dugout and didn’t say anything.
“The gun was a semiautomatic,” Brooks said, adding that he was sure it was a rifle but unsure what kind. “It continued to fire at different people. You can imagine, all the people on the field scatter.”
Scalise is the first member of Congress to be shot since former Arizona Rep. Gabby Giffords was shot in January 2011. Giffords was shot in the head by Jared Lee Loughner at a “Congress On Your Corner” event at a Tucson grocery store. Giffords, who authorities said was the main target of the shooting, survived the attack but six others were killed and an additional 12 were injured.
Loughner pleaded guilty in 2012 and was sentenced to life in prison without the possibility of parole.
This story is breaking and will be updated.

Hillary Clinton, Jeff Sessions and America’s Secret Slave System

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF ‘THE ROOT’ NEWS)

Hillary Clinton, Jeff Sessions and America’s Secret Slave System

Gerald Herbert/APImages

Contrary to popular belief, slavery was never outlawed in the United States.

This statement is not a debatable, half-twisted analysis or a cynical opinion. It is a fact. The 13th Amendment to the Constitution does not outlaw slavery, it only prohibits slavery in certain situations. It is entirely constitutional to turn drug dealers, gangbangers and thugs into slaves. It is perfectly legal for corporations to use legions of slaves to increase their profit and pass them along to shareholders. Even though it seems like the opposite of freedom, America is totally cool it.

Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

The 13th Amendment to the Constitution of the United States Of America

When Hillary Clinton stood at Keene University and called black men “superpredators” in January 1996, it was only a few days after the New Year’s Day release of her book It Takes a Village. In the book, Clinton spoke about her days in the Arkansas governor’s mansion and the longstanding tradition of using convicted felons as free labor.

Clinton could relax and have her dark-skinned dishwashers clean the mayonnaise residue off her finger-sandwich plates because Arkansas is one of the few states that still uses prison labor without compensating the prisoners. She was cool with it, though—except when she was forced to send “back to prison any inmate who broke a rule.” Clinton lovingly referred to the felons as “emotional illiterates,” which is a little demeaning, but apparently not as much as the ones she hadn’t locked up yet, whose powers allowed them to grow into “super predators.”

America has the largest prison population in the world. According to the Washington Post, about half of the 1.6 million people in state or federal prisons are black, even though African-Americans make up roughly 13 percent of the population. “Black Americans were incarcerated in state prisons at an average rate of 5.1 times that of white Americans,” The Guardian reported last year, “and in some states that rate was 10 times or more.” Even when convicted of the same crime as whites, black convicts, according to a 2014 study (pdf), were even more likely to serve time in private prisons.

The untold, secret story of America’s criminal-justice system is that there are large corporations benefiting from free black labor, and under the Trump administration, business is booming.

The Profit in the Policy

In August 2016, former President Barack Obama announced a push by his administration to end the federal use of private prisons. This directive sent private-prison stocks into a downward spiral. One of the first decisions Jeff Sessions made as the current attorney general under President Donald Trump was to reverse this order. The second move by the Sessions-led Department of Justice was to end the Obama administration’s practice of not seeking mandatory minimums for nonviolent drug offenses. When the DOJ released the memo rescinding this policy, private-prison stocks soared to an all-time high.

Perhaps Sessions’ decision was based on Republican ideals of “law and order.” Maybe it was because all conservatives believe private companies do a better job at running prisons than the government (data shows they don’t).

However, it might be because Jeff Sessions’ investment portfolio is filled with thousands of dollars in private-prison stock. It’s likely because GEO Group Inc. and CoreCivic, two of the nation’s largest private-prison operators, gave hundreds of thousands of dollars to Trump’s fundraising efforts.

The New Slaves

There are prisons and companies all across the country who use free or barely-paid prison labor to make a profit. According to the Prison Policy Initiative, these prisoners make between 12 cents and $1.14 an hour. Some of the products and companies that benefit from this slave labor include:

This list doesn’t include the states, like Mississippi, Louisiana and Arkansas, which don’t pay prisoners at all for labor. Places like Angola State Prison are known for the cruel and inhumane treatment of their prisoners, forcing them to live in tents and work for free.

In February, immigration detention center detainees filed suit against GEO, the private-prison operator that made it rain on the Trump campaign. According to the lawsuit, the corporation used as many as 50,000 federal detainees to work for free, or for as little as $1 a day, even threatening some with solitary confinement for refusing to work as a slave.

As harsh as this sounds, there will be more. With the DOJ’s directive to use mandatory minimums and the renewal of the war on drugs, slavery will make a comeback under the Trump administration.

But this is all legal and constitutional. No one argues that these prisoners aren’t slaves—or even that blacks are more likely to endure this indentured servitude. The only argument for this system of slavery is that it is profitable. It remains a stain on the American flag because we live in an oligarchy. The only reason it exists is because without it, the multibillionaires at Honda, Microsoft and McDonald’s might have to live life as regular, run-of-the-mill billionaires. How else is Jeff Sessions supposed to line his pockets with the bloody dollar bills he’s earned off the backs of the oppressed?

Slavery is still legal in the U.S. because there is apparently one thing that has always trumped freedom, equality and justice: White people’s money.

… and to the Republic, for which it stands, with liberty and justice for all.

Michael Harriot is a staff writer at The Root, host of “The Black One” podcast and editor-in-chief of the daily digital magazine NegusWhoRead.

  • Oh, so we’re back to taking a dump on Hillary now? Hillary’s whitesplaining of felon labour in the nineties is not even close to the level of Jeff Sessions essentially deciding that a child with a bag of weed should get the maximum possible sentence. Not the same level. Not even close. Hillary was whitepeopling back in the nineties as a first lady of Arkansas and FLOTUS. But unfortunately most white Dems were back then. Hell, even Obama was slow to right the wrong of felon labour. (August 2016? Seriously? After 8 years? C’mon) As the culture changed, so did Hillary. Jefferson Beauregard Sessions remained in the past, however. Equating Sessions and Hillary is unfair.

  • I remain confused about one thing and I’m hoping someone can clarify. When the 13th Amendment is brought up, are we saying that there’s a problem with using prisoners for labor as a general concept, or is it because of the fact that people are imprisoned unjustly in the first place and it therefore becomes de facto slavery? Meaning that I don’t oppose the death penalty on a general moral principle, I oppose it because there’s no way in our society we can be sure we’re not executing an innocent person. Is it the same here or is there something I’m still missing?

British police identify 2 attackers in Saturday rampage as residents of east London

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE WASHINGTON POST)

British police identify 2 attackers in Saturday rampage as residents of east London

Three men in a speeding van mowed down pedestrians on London Bridge before getting out and stabbing patrons at nearby bars and restaurants on June 3. (The Washington Post)
June 5 at 2:22 PM
Police on Monday named two of the three attackers who killed seven people during a rampage through central London, saying that both had lived only miles away from the scene of the carnage and that one had been on the radar of security services.London’s Metropolitan Police identified the assailants as 27-year-old Khuram Shazad Butt, a British citizen who was born in Pakistan, and 30-year-old Rachid Redouane, who had claimed to be Moroccan and Libyan.

Both lived in the Barking area of east London, only a half-hour’s drive from London Bridge and Borough Market — the two adjacent areas where victims were targeted Saturday night. Police did not identify the third attacker, saying efforts to confirm his identity are ongoing.

One of the attackers had been investigated in 2015, but police said they had no warning of a plot and the investigation had been dropped to a lower priority.

“Khuram Shazad Butt was known to the police and MI5,” police said in a statement, referring to Britain’s main domestic intelligence agency. “However, there was no intelligence to suggest that this attack was being planned and the investigation had been prioritized accordingly. The other named man, Rachid Redouane, was not known.”

Butt had been known as an extremist in his east London neighborhood and was featured last year in a documentary on Britain’s Channel 4 called “The Jihadis Next Door.”

The police say they have 500 ongoing terrorism investigations and are keeping tabs on 3,000 individuals suspected of extremism. Investigations involving known plots, authorities say, take up the bulk of the security services’ resources.

Both of the assailants behind earlier attacks in Britain this spring also had attracted notice from authorities. But, like Butt, they were considered peripheral figures.

All three assailants in Saturday night’s attack were fatally shot by police within eight minutes of the first emergency calls.

Monday’s identifications came as the police investigation intensified, with raids in Barking and Newham, another east London neighborhood, and as politicians officially resumed campaigning ahead of an unpredictable election that will be held in just three days. As of late Monday afternoon, 11 people were in custody, with police probing possible connections to the attackers.

Saturday night’s attack injured dozens, including four police officers. Eighteen people remain in critical condition.

Speaking on the BBC, Metropolitan Police Chief Cressida Dick said the majority of recent attacks have had a “domestic center of gravity,” although with some of them, there are “undoubtedly international dimensions.”

In an indication of the continuing threat, morning commuters on three major Thames River crossings found newly erected barriers Monday that separated roadways from walkways. The structures appeared designed to thwart the sort of attack in which assailants use vehicles to swerve into pedestrians — a tactic that has been used twice in three months.

Christine Archibald, 30, a Canadian from the western province of British Columbia, was the first victim of the Saturday attack to be named. The 30-year-old had worked at a homeless shelter in Calgary before moving to Europe to live with her fiance.

“Please honor her by making your community a better place. Volunteer your time and labor or donate to a homeless shelter. Tell them Chrissy sent you,” her family said in a statement.

At a news briefing from the area of the attack, London Mayor Sadiq Khan said he was “furious” that the attackers used Islam as justification for their actions.

“I’m angry and furious that these three men are seeking to justify their actions by using the faith that I belong to,” said Khan, London’s first Muslim mayor and the West’s most prominent Muslim politician. “The ideology they follow is perverse, and it is poisonous.”

Later on Monday, President Trump escalated an attack on Khan that he began Sunday. Trump had chided the mayor for attempting to calm the public by assuring that there was “no need to be alarmed.”

Khan’s comments were in reference to an intensified police presence on London streets. But Trump incorrectly implied that they were a comment about the attack itself.

On Monday, Trump tweeted: “Pathetic excuse by London Mayor Sadiq Khan who had to think fast on his ‘no reason to be alarmed’ statement.”

Khan’s spokesman said the mayor was focused on the city’s response to the attack and would not have any comment on Trump. On Sunday, the mayor’s office said Khan “has more important things to do than respond to Donald Trump’s ill-informed tweet.”

Trump’s tweets were widely mocked in Britain, where the overwhelming mood was one of unity against terrorism and praise for security services.

Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the opposition Labour Party, accused the U.S. president of lacking both “grace” and “sense.”

Prime Minister Theresa May, who has gone to great lengths to cultivate ties with Trump, defended Khan on Sunday while carefully avoiding any criticism of the U.S. president. Under repeated questioning from British journalists Monday, she said Khan was “doing a good job, and it’s wrong to say anything else.”

On Sunday night, tens of thousands attended an Ariana Grande benefit concert   that was originally intended to honor the victims of last month’s suicide bombing at the singer’s concert in Manchester but was expanded to recognize the victims in London.

Following the May 22 attack in Manchester, Saturday night’s van-and-knife rampage was the second mass-casualty attack to intrude on the homestretch of a parliamentary campaign that was once thought certain to end in a landslide for May and the Conservatives. The race has tightened in recent weeks, and terrorism has introduced an unexpected variable.

Rival party leaders lashed out at one another Monday over whether more police officers or more police powers are needed to combat terrorism.

During a speech in central London, May repeatedly refused to say that she regretted cutting police numbers during her time as home secretary. Instead, she said the Conservative Party had given police and security services enhanced powers to fight terrorism.

“We’ve given increased powers to be able to deal with terrorists, powers that Jeremy Corbyn has boasted he has always opposed,” she said.

Corbyn shot back, telling ITV that “we should never have cut the police numbers.”

Asked whether he would support calls for May to resign over the police cuts, Corbyn said, “Indeed I would,” before amending his comments to suggest that Thursday’s election is “perhaps the best opportunity to deal with it.”

Khan, a member of the Labour Party, also took aim at May’s cuts, noting in an appearance at Borough Market that the Metropolitan Police had had its budget slashed by 600 million pounds — about $775 million — with more cuts planned.

The department, he noted, not only has to combat terrorism, it also has to prepare for major international events and high-profile visitors. “Some welcome, some less so,” Khan noted in a subtle dig at Trump, who’s due in Britain for a state visit later this year.

Dick, the police chief, declined to be drawn into the debate, saying that “any police leader would always want more resources” but not directly addressing calls for greater funding.

With her premiership on the line, May took an aggressive and combative tone Sunday, telling the nation that “enough is enough” and insisting that there is “far too much tolerance for extremism in our country.”

“Things need to change,” she said in a speech outside the prime minister’s residence at 10 Downing Street.

She blamed the attack on the “evil ideology of Islamist extremism,” called for a thorough review of the nation’s counterterrorism policies and suggested that she will take a much tougher line if she wins Thursday’s vote.

May’s comments were welcomed Monday by the Muslim Council of Britain, an umbrella organization that represents Muslim communities. Harun Khan, secretary general of the group, said in a statement that he was angry about the attack and that the council was determined to confront extremism.

“That is why we agree with the prime minister that things must change. Enough is enough,” he said. “We are ready to have those difficult conversations, as equal citizens with an equal stake in this fight.”

Investigators were focused on the likelihood that the attack had been inspired, if not directed, by the Islamic State. The militant group on Sunday asserted responsibility for the rampage and again called on its followers to carry out attacks in the West, especially during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan.

But the group did not provide any details to prove its involvement in the Saturday assault. Similar claims in the past have been shown to be unreliable.

Saturday’s killings were eerily similar in style to a March attack. In that attack, a man rammed pedestrians on a different Thames River crossing and fatally stabbed a police officer at the gates of Parliament.

The three recent attacks were not connected, May said. But she described them as “a new trend” in which terrorists are “copying one another and often using the crudest means of attack.”

Flight From Australia To Malaysia: Man Tries To Break Into Cockpit, Passengers Upset At Police

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

(CNN) Australian police have defended their actions after a passenger tried to force his way into the cockpit on a Malaysia Airlines flight from Melbourne to Kuala Lumpur Thursday.

Just after a takeoff, a male passenger on Flight MH128 tried to enter the cockpit while holding what one passenger described as a “huge, unusual, black, metallic, strange thing… size of a watermelon.”
“He was yelling ‘I need to see the pilot, I need to see the pilot,'” passenger and former AFL player Andrew Leoncelli told Australia’s ABC News.
The mid-flight scare ended safely, but passengers later criticized the police response which saw them sit on the tarmac for 90 minutes with what they thought could be a bomb on board, according to the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.
“We could see them [the police] all outside, but they weren’t coming on the plane and nobody knew why,” passenger Selena Brown told the ABC.

Man ‘recently released from psychiatric care’

During a press briefing Thursday, Chief Commissioner of Victoria Police Graham Ashton said police initially treated the incident as terror related.
“Counter-terrorism response and protocols kicked in… for us that meant having the plane isolated, and as soon as practicable, getting the passengers off the plane safely and dealing with the offender,” Ashton said.
Ashton confirmed the passenger approached the flight deck with something many feared could be a bomb.
“He was certainly at the cockpit door, seeking entry to the door, holding this device,” he said. “The device was described as an amplifier type instrument… it can potentially be wired up and dealt with in a dangerous manner.”
After flight staff intercepted the man at the cockpit, he was chased down the aisle by other passengers to the back of the plane, where they used a spare seat belt and cables to tie him up.
“He was essentially trussed up as the flight returned to Melbourne,” Ashton said.
Police later identified the suspect as a 25-year-old Sri Lankan man who had recently been released from psychiatric care. He was not considered a terror threat, they said.
Malaysia Airlines confirmed the flight was forced to turn back to Melbourne due to a “disruptive passenger.”
“An investigation led by Australian authorities is currently underway and Malaysia Airlines wishes to extend its appreciation to everyone involved during the emergency situation,” it said in a statement.

Florida Man Accused of Killing ‘Neo-Nazi’ Roommates for Disrespecting Islam

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME NEWS)

Roommates Killed-Suspect
This photo made available Saturday, May 20, 2017, by the Tampa Police Department, Fla., shows Devon Arthurs, 18. Tampa Police Department—AP

Florida Man Accused of Killing ‘Neo-Nazi’ Roommates for Disrespecting Islam

7:19 PM ET

A Florida man is accused of fatally shooting his two roommates, with whom he said he recently shared neo-Nazi beliefs, in their apartment on Friday.

Devon Arthurs, 18, told police that he killed his roommates, 22-year-old Jeremy Himmelman and 18-year-old Andrew Oneschuk, because they disrespected his faith after he converted to Islam, according to the Tampa Bay Times, citing police reports.

Arthurs led police back to his apartment after briefly taking three people hostage in a nearby smoke shop, telling the hostages “he was upset due to America bombing his Muslim countries,” police Detective Kenneth Nightlinger wrote in a police report.

After Arthurs surrendered, police officers asked if anyone else was hurt. Arthurs told them: “The people in the apartment, but they aren’t hurt, they’re dead.”

Brandon Russell — the fourth roommate in the Tampa apartment, who kept a framed photo of Oklahoma City bomber Timothy McVeigh in his room — was arrested Sunday on federal explosive charges after officers found a cooler full of an explosive material that belonged to him, the Times reported.

Attorney General Orders Tougher Sentences, Rolling Back Obama Policy

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE NEW YORK TIMES)

Photo

Attorney General Jeff Sessions has in the past suggested that prosecuting drug crimes more vigorously will broadly reduce other crime. CreditJim Lo Scalzo/European Pressphoto Agency

WASHINGTON — Attorney General Jeff Sessions ordered federal prosecutors late Thursday to pursue the toughest possible charges and sentences against crime suspects, reversing Obama administration efforts to ease penalties for some nonviolent drug violations.

The drastic shift in criminal justice policy, foreshadowed during recent weeks, is Mr. Sessions’s first major stamp on the Justice Department, and it highlights several of his top targets: drug dealing, gun crime and gang violence. The Justice Department released the new directives on Friday.

In an eight-paragraph memo to the nation’s prosecutors, Mr. Sessions returned to the guidance of President George W. Bush’s administration by calling for more uniform punishments — including mandatory minimum sentences — and directing prosecutors to pursue the strictest possible charges. Mr. Sessions’s policy, however, is broader than that of the Bush administration, and will be more reliant on the judgments of United States attorneys and assistant attorneys general.

The policy signaled a return to “enforcing the laws that Congress has passed,” Mr. Sessions said on Friday at the Justice Department, characterizing his memo as unique for the leeway it afforded federal prosecutors around the country.

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“They deserve to be un-handcuffed and not micromanaged from Washington,” he said. “It means we are going to meet our responsibility to enforce the law with judgment and fairness. It’s simply the right and moral thing to do.”

The guidance allowed for limited exceptions. “There will be circumstances in which good judgment would lead a prosecutor to conclude that a strict application of the above charging policy is not warranted,” Mr. Sessions wrote.

His memo replaced the orders of former Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr., who in 2013 encouraged prosecutors to consider the individual circumstances of a case and to exercise discretion in charging drug crimes. Mr. Holder directed prosecutors — when considering nonviolent defendants with insignificant criminal histories and no connections to drug trafficking or other criminal organizations — to omit details about drug quantities from charging documents so as not to lead to automatically harsh penalties.

Document: Memo by Sessions to U.S. Attorneys on Charges and Sentencing

Mr. Holder called the new policy “unwise and ill-informed,” saying it ignored consensus between Democrats and Republicans, and data demonstrating that prosecutions of high-level drug defendants had risen under his guidance.

“This absurd reversal is driven by voices who have not only been discredited but until now have been relegated to the fringes of this debate,” he said in a statement.

Supporters of Mr. Holder’s policy have argued that quantities of drugs are a weak indicator of how dangerous a person may be.

“Long sentences for low-level, nonviolent drug offenses do not promote public safety, deterrence and rehabilitation,” Mr. Holder wrote in his 2013 memo, noting that in fact they exacerbate an expensive, overburdened prison system. The Obama administration, which led a bipartisan push for more lenient and flexible sentencing laws, presided over the first decline in the federal prison population in a generation.

Mr. Sessions’s memo explicitly mentioned Mr. Holder’s 2013 directive in a footnote and rescinded it effective immediately.

Mr. Sessions’s policy was most similar to one issued by Attorney General John Ashcroft in 2003. Then, Mr. Ashcroft outlined six specific types of “limited exceptions” in his memo — which ran nearly four times the length of Mr. Sessions’s new guidance, and repeatedly referenced particular federal statutes. Mr. Sessions, by contrast, outlined no specific scenarios and provided little detail.

Instead, he simply directed prosecutors to “carefully consider whether an exception may be justified.” He said any exceptions to ease criminal penalties must be documented and approved by United States attorneys, assistant attorneys general or their designees.

“There’s a long history of these memos saying both that prosecutors should charge the most serious, readily provable offense, but also that prosecutors should exercise some discretion,” said David Alan Sklansky, a law professor at Stanford University who specializes in criminal justice. “There’s tension between those two things.”

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