Trump Plans On Ending State Level Medical And Personal Marijuana Sales

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HILL NEWS)

 

President  Trump is once again threatening to derail medical cannabis access in the majority of U.S. states that regulate its access and use.

In his recently released 2021 federal budget proposal, the president has called for ending existing federal protections that limit the federal government from interfering in the state-sanctioned regulation of medical cannabis. Doing so would place thousands of medical cannabis providers and the millions of patients who rely on them at risk for criminal prosecution.

Some context: since 2014, Congress has repeatedly approved spending legislation forbidding the Justice Department from using federal funds for the explicit purpose of preventing states from “implementing their own state laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession or cultivation of medical marijuana.”

Thirty-three states and the District of Columbia regulate the production and dispensing of medical cannabis products to over three million patients. All of these programs, and the patients served by them, would be at risk if the president gets his way.

To those following this issue closely, the president ’s latest move hardly comes as a surprise. Despite Trump mentioning during his campaign that he supported medical marijuana and a general states-rights approach to cannabis policy, his presidency has consistently proven these words to ring hollow.

Most recently, Marc Lotter, the director of strategic communications for Trump’s 2020 campaign, stated in an interview that the administration is intent on keeping marijuana illegal under federal law. “I think what the president is looking at is looking at this from a standpoint of a parent of a young person to make sure that we keep our kids away from drugs,” he said. “They need to be kept illegal, that is the federal policy. I think the president has been pretty clear on his views on marijuana at the federal level, I know many states have taken a different path.”

Let’s be clear — the policy that the administration wants to keep in place is the same failed policy that has existed since 1970, which opines that the cannabis plant should remain classified in the same category as heroin and possesses no accepted medical value. This position doesn’t comport with either public opinion or scientific reality

The data speaks for itself. It is not an alternative fact that state-regulated medical marijuana has been proven to possess important benefits to millions of patients while not undermining public safety or health.

To date, these regulatory programs are operating largely as voters and politicians intended. The enactment of these policies has not negatively impacted workplace safety, crime rates, traffic safety, or youth use patterns. Additionally, they have stimulated economic development and created hundreds of millions of dollars in new tax revenue. That is why more and more states are enacting medical cannabis laws while existing states are continually expanding them. No state that has passed a medical cannabis access law has ever repealed it.

Americans almost universally know that patients are not criminals and that marijuana indisputably has medical value in the treatment of a wide range of ailments. A recent poll from Quinnipiac University found an eye-popping 94 percent of Americans support the legal use of medical cannabis.

It makes no political sense for the president to try and put this genie back in the bottle and it up to Congress to see that he does not.

Justin Strekal is the Political Director for NORML, where he serves as an advocate to end the federal prohibition of marijuana and to reform our nation’s laws to no longer discriminate against its consumers. 

LEGALIZING CANNABIS LINKED TO LESS OPIOID PRESCRIPTIONS

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NEWSWEEK)

 

LEGALIZING CANNABIS LINKED TO LESS OPIOID PRESCRIPTIONS, COULD HELP COMBAT EPIDEMIC, SCIENTISTS SAY

There are less opioid prescriptions on average in U.S. states where medical and recreational marijuana are legal, research has revealed.

Access to recreational cannabis in the U.S. was tied with a 11.8 percent lower rate of opioids prescriptions each day, and 4.2 percent for medical marijuana. The authors of the paper published in the Journal of Health Economics said recreational weed laws could make it easier for patients to access the drug, and use it to treat pain and other conditions.

Both types of law also appeared to cut down the total number of patients receiving opioids, as well as the total days opioids were supplied, and the likelihood of a healthcare provider prescribing the painkillers. The study also showed family physicians gave out more opioids than any other healthcare specialty, such as dentists or nurses.

The authors looked at data on over 1.5 billion individual opioid prescriptions between 2011 and 2018, representing around 90 percent of all of this type of drug given out over the time period.

The research comes amid the opioid overdose epidemic in the U.S., which kills 130 Americans every day according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Cannabis access laws could be a useful tool in combating the prescription opioid epidemic,” the researchers wrote.

“While state governments have enacted various policies to curtail opioid prescriptions, e.g., prescription drug monitoring programs, many of these policies simply limit access to opioids and may push individuals already dependent on prescription opioids to more dangerous drugs, such as heroin,” they said.

“Thus, policies that reduce opioid prescriptions without leading individuals to substitute more dangerous drugs may be preferable to policies that simply restrict opioid prescriptions.” One option could be legalizing cannabis, the researchers argued.

Addressing concerns that cannabis may be a gateway drug which could lead users to opioids in the long-term, the team said: “While cannabis may be a gateway drug that encourages use of opioids in some patients, on balance for the population generally both recreational and medical cannabis access laws decrease opioid use.”

The researchers said the study was limited because they did not have access to data on patients because of confidentiality, meaning they couldn’t look for patterns of problematic patterns of opioid prescription. They also couldn’t examine which conditions the painkillers were given for.

The authors wrote: “While the results here do not suggest that cannabis access laws are the only tool to address prescription opioid use, they do suggest that cannabis access laws could play a meaningful role in addressing the opioid epidemic.”

Benjamin J. McMichael, assistant professor at the University of Alabama School of Law, told Newsweek: “While we expected that recreational cannabis access laws would have a stronger effect on opioid prescriptions, I would say we were surprised that the effect was so much larger than medical cannabis access laws.”

McMichael said: “This study is significant because it analyzed more data that provided more specific information than has been available in previous studies. It therefore provides more precise estimates of the effect of cannabis access laws on opioid prescriptions and controls for more potential confounding factors than prior work.

“Because this research provided insight into the effect of cannabis access laws across payers (e.g., Medicare and private insurance) and medical specialties, it can provide policymakers with specific targets in how they evaluate cannabis access laws.”

Ian Hamilton, an expert in drug use and mental health at the Department of Health Sciences at the U.K.’s University of York who did not work on the research, told Newsweek the study builds on others exploring the impact of opening up access to cannabis on opiate prescribing, but using a larger data set and more sophisticated analyses.

“The main problem with this study is that it doesn’t take into account the efforts made by many states and prescribers at reducing opiate prescriptions in light of the record numbers overdosing on opiates,” said Hamilton.

“Over the last few years awareness of inappropriate opiate prescribing has increased, so it could be that some of the reduction in opiate prescriptions is due to concern by doctors and healthcare providers rather than individuals switching to cannabis,” he argued.

Hamilton cautioned that as the awareness of cannabis products has increased in recent years, so have the claims about its health benefits—despite some being untested.

He said: “The problem with switching to cannabis is that there is very limited research so far to suggest that it is beneficial for anything other than a few minor health problems.

“That may change as evidence emerges but as it stands some people could be disappointed with the results of using cannabis and may risk their health deteriorating if they delay obtaining the right treatment,” Hamilton said.

Earlier this year, a separate team of researchers pinpointed a different way that cannabis could help tackle the opioid crisis. Cannabidiol (CBD), a non-psychoactive chemical in marijuana, was found to ease the cravings and anxiety associated with giving up heroin in former addicts. It also appeared to lessen signs of stress, such as an increased heart rate and levels of the stress hormone cortisol. The findings were published in The American Journal of Psychiatry.

This article has been updated with comment from Benjamin J. McMichael.

The One Main Reason Legal Pot Sales Are Lacking: Greed/Price

The One Main Reason Legal Pot Sales Are Lacking: Greed/Price

(A commentary by OldPoet56)

 

I have been reading articles the past couple of days in main stream media that marijuana sales in California are in big trouble financially and the legal companies are complaining to the state about their hardships. Folks I knew that this issue would arise back when the vote was made to make it legal. I am no rocket scientist and I know that by no means was I the only one to see this coming issue. The only reason this is happening is the price of the product, the greed of the “legal” corporations and the greed of the politicians. Greed from the politicians in the form of tax revenue on the product. Greed on the side of the “legal” Corporations by pricing the product way out of the reach of the very people who voted to make it legal in the first place. Most people who want or need the product cannot afford the “legal” price. The price on ‘the street’ is already to high for most everyday working or disabled people to afford. The price of the ‘legal’ product is many times higher that the street price. In many cases the price of one ounce of legal marijuana in a store is higher than the price of an ounce of gold. If people cannot afford to buy the legal product and they are financially forced to buy it off of the street then the state gets no tax revenue from the sales. When a legal growers store wants $500-2,000 per ounce there are very few people who can afford it at all, if they are going to buy it they will buy if off of a street vendor for $150-350 per ounce. Even these street vendors prices are to high for the average person to buy any of it. If a person is working a job for $12 per hour, after taxes it would take most all of their pay check just to buy one ounce per week, and that is at street prices. A huge amount of regular working people could easily spend their whole months earnings on one ounce of “legal” weed. People cannot afford the product, this is THE reason that sales figures are way down from what was expected by the corporations and the politicians, it is not rocket science, it is an issue of cost, of GREED!

 

(Humor/Poem) Roll Me One

Roll Me One

 

I was about seventeen the first time I tried this God-given herb

A friend rolled me one in the parking lot of the senior high

It didn’t do anything the first three or four times I did try

Turns out the tobacco was homegrown, a waste of my time

 

Columbia, I remember the first time I ever heard of the name

Was because of the red and the gold haired tobacco they grew

Makes a person wish they could go and live down there too

 

Wacky tabacky now I understand why good people have to shield

Left handed cigarettes, disguised with silly names that we give it

A pure Herb God has given for all of man to be able to enjoy

Pharmaceuticals and Alcohol lobbyist pay politicians to damn it

 

It is so evil that people are forbidden to be able to enjoy God’s gifts

Folks should be able to Roll one up and remove their daily stresses

Big Brother takes the rights of the peace-loving people away

People want freedom, Big Brother’s chooses to act like a snake

Politicians make laws so crooked the people can not freely partake

 

Roll one for me my brother but do not assume your God-given freedom

The snake is self-elected and manipulating full of venom and pure evil

Roll one in secret but be careful for there are electronic narcs all around

The Demons in D.C. and the State Houses are professional liars and thieves

A couple planted grams, they now own all you worked a lifetime to achieve

 

Kentucky election brings new hope for medical cannabis

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE MARIJUANA POLICY PROJECT)

 

Kentucky election brings new hope for medical cannabis

Andy Beshear voiced strong support for reform throughout his campaign — contact your legislators today and urge them to work with the new governor to pass a medical cannabis law!

Dear Ted:

After years of frustration, advocates for medical cannabis may finally have their best chance to succeed in the 2020 legislative session. Newly elected Governor Andy Beshear has indicated that he strongly supports medical cannabis, so the challenge will be getting a bill through the legislature and to the governor’s desk.

Rep. Jason Nemes has already pre-filed a medical cannabis bill in advance of the legislative session, which begins January 7. Last year, the House Judiciary Committee overwhelmingly approved a medical cannabis bill, but time ran out, and it never received a floor vote. Please write your legislators today and urge them to legalize medical cannabis in 2020!

After you write your legislators, please share this message with your friends and family.

Sincerely,


Matt Simon
Legislative Analyst
Marijuana Policy Project

 

 


 

Marijuana Policy Project
P.O. Box 21824​ | Washington, D.C. 20009
202-462-5747 | [email protected]

Vote To Federally Legalize Marijuana Planned In Congress

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF FORBES)

 

560,205 views

Vote To Federally Legalize Marijuana Planned In Congress

A key congressional committee plans to hold a historic vote on a bill to end the federal prohibition of marijuana next week, two sources with knowledge of the soon-to-be-announced action said.

The legislation, sponsored by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-NY), would remove cannabis from the Controlled Substances Act (CSA) and set aside funding to begin repairing the damage of the war on drugs, which has been disproportionately waged against communities of color.

Those programs—such as job training and legal aid for people impacted by prohibition enforcement, loans for small cannabis businesses owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged individuals and efforts to minimize barriers to licensing and employment in the legal industry—would be paid for with a new federal five percent tax on marijuana sales instituted under the bill, and some of them would be administered by a new Cannabis Justice Office in the Department of Justice.

The proposal, the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act, would also provide for resentencing and expungement of records for people previously convicted of cannabis offenses and would shield immigrants from being denied citizenship status over marijuana.

Today In: Business

It currently has 55 cosponsors, all but one of whom are Democrats.

A Senate companion is being led by Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), a 2020 presidential candidate, though it has not yet been scheduled for action in the GOP-controlled chamber.

Wednesday’s planned Judiciary Committee vote on the far-reaching cannabis reform legislation—which hasn’t yet been officially listed but is expected to be announced on Monday—comes about two months after the full House overwhelmingly approved a bipartisan bill to increase marijuana businesses’ access to banks.

Politico reported on Saturday that Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA), who is not a member of the panel, vaguely mentioned upcoming committee consideration while speaking at a conference in Southern California.

The congresswoman reportedly didn’t clarify that the legislation would be formally “marked up,” or voted on, a detail that sources shared with Marijuana Moment in recent days. A Judiciary Committee spokesperson hasn’t responded to several inquiries about the pending vote.

The planned action on the bill, which would also block federal agencies from denying public benefits or security clearances over marijuana use, follows a hearing a Judiciary subcommittee held in July that examined the connection between marijuana legalization and racial justice.

The markup will provide the opportunity for lawmakers on both sides of the aisle to file amendments to the bill, and could shed further light on an emerging divide between cannabis reform supporters who feel it is essential to address past drug war harms and equity in the cannabis industry immediately and those who believe it makes more sense to advance more limited, states’ rights-focused legislation that could stand a better chance of advancing through the Senate and to President Trump’s desk.

Those tensions surfaced both during the Judiciary hearing this summer as well as in the lead up to the House floor vote on the cannabis banking legislation. Some pro-legalization groups went so far as to ask leadership to delay the scheduled vote on the financial services bill because they took issue with what is seen as an industry-focused proposal moving ahead of one containing restorative justice provisions such as the MORE Act.

In response to those concerns, top Democrats such as Nadler and House Minority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) pledged that while they were moving ahead with the banking vote, they also saw the importance of following up by advancing more comprehensive cannabis legislation.

Advancing the MORE Act or a similar rescheduling proposal through committee and onto the House floor would make good on that pledge.

It’s less certain how the Senate would react to House passage of a far-reaching bill to end federal marijuana prohibition. Some advocates believe that only a more modest proposal to exempt state-approved cannabis activity from federal prohibition stands a chance in the Republican-controlled body.

That bill, the Strengthening the Tenth Amendment Through Entrusting States (STATES) Act, would not formally deschedule marijuana under the CSA and doesn’t include measures aimed at ensuring equity in the legal industry for communities most harmed by the drug war.

President Trump has voiced support for the less far-reaching bill, which is led by Sens. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Cory Gardner (R-CO).

Follow me on Twitter. Check out my website.

I’m a 15-year veteran of the cannabis law reform movement, and I know where to look to spot the most interesting legalization developments. I’m the editor of the cannab…

Read More

Quebec Superior Court overturns province’s ban on homegrown cannabis

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE MONTREAL GAZETTE)

 

Quebec Superior Court overturns province’s ban on homegrown cannabis

Ruling means that Quebecers are now free to cultivate up to four cannabis plants at home without facing legal repercussions.

“As a Quebec citizen, I subscribe to the idea that it’s better to control cannabis by allowing it to be grown at home,” said Julien Fortier, the lawyer who led the challenge. ALLEN MCINNIS / MONTREAL GAZETTE

SHAREADJUSTCOMMENTPRINT

Quebec Superior Court Judge Manon Lavoie overturned the province’s ban on homegrown cannabis on Tuesday, meaning that Quebecers are now free to cultivate cannabis at home without facing legal repercussions.

In June 2018, the provincial government passed Quebec’s cannabis law, which included provisions banning the cultivation of cannabis at home.

However, Lavoie ruled that these provisions are unconstitutional as they infringe upon the jurisdiction of the federal government, which has sole responsibility for legislating on criminal matters.

As a result, homegrown cannabis in Quebec is now regulated by Canadian law, which allows citizens to grow up to four cannabis plants.

“As a Quebec citizen, I subscribe to the idea that it’s better to control cannabis by allowing it to be grown at home,” said Julien Fortier, the lawyer who led the challenge.

Fortier took on the case after being approached by Janick Murray Hall, who wanted to bring the action to court on behalf of all those in Quebec who have been prosecuted for being in possession of cannabis plants.

According to the lawyer, Lavoie’s ruling fits with why the government opted to legalize cannabis in the first place.

“The entire idea behind the legalization of cannabis was that the government wanted to remove the production of this plant from organized crime,” Fortier said. “If you allow people to cultivate this plant themselves, that purpose would be achieved.”

Still, Fortier is urging Quebec home growers to avoid celebrating prematurely, as the provincial government has 30 days to file a petition to the Court of Appeal. In fact, he warns there is a “very strong chance” the government will seek an appeal.

“I don’t think the Quebec government will do nothing and let it slide,” he said. “Regardless, we’re looking forward to the fight.”

[email protected]

RELATED

A New Cannabis Survey Reveals the No. 1 Legalization Hurdle

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE MOTLEY FOOL’S PAPER)

 

A New Cannabis Survey Reveals the No. 1 Legalization Hurdle

Despite budding public support for marijuana, cannabis could remain illegal in the U.S. for a long time to come.

Jul 6, 2019 at 9:06AM
As recently as a decade ago, marijuana was considered to be a taboo topic. Politicians skirted the issue if ever questioned, and Americans mostly avoided the discussion of what was largely an illicit drug throughout the United States.

But a lot has changed in a decade. Today, two-thirds of the country have given the green light to medical marijuana, and Illinois recently became the 11th state to OK adult-use marijuana. Recreational sales will commence in the Land of Lincoln on Jan. 1, 2020. We’ve also witnessed a number of politicians openly discuss, and perhaps even support, marijuana reform at the federal level.

So, if so much has changed, at least among the public and at the state level, why hasn’t the government shifted its stance on marijuana at the federal level? A recent poll from CBS News reveals the key insight that’s holding the industry back.

A black silhouette of the U.S. partially filled in with cannabis baggies, rolled joints, and a scale.

IMAGE SOURCE: GETTY IMAGES.

Support for legalization hits an all-time high in this annual survey

In April, just ahead of 4/20 (April 20), a celebrated day among the cannabis community, CBS News released its now-annual survey that outlines how the public perceives marijuana. When asking if respondents favored the idea of legal marijuana use, an all-time record 65% were in support, which is up 6 percentage points from April 2018, and 20 percentage points from April 2013. This result more or less jibes with national pollster Gallup’s results, which showed 66% support for legalization in its October 2018 survey.

Among the findings, CBS News found that, for the first time ever in its polling, a majority of Republicans supported legalization (56%). However, as has been the case for some time now, seniors aged 65 and up were still on the fence about legalization, with just 49% in support of such an idea. Comparatively, 72% of young adults aged 18 to 34 were in favor of legalization, along with 72% of self-identified Democrats.

One of the primary reasons marijuana has been growing in popularity is that most Americans view it as a positive for the local economy. Just over half of those people polled (52%) suggested that cannabis could be an economic positive, compared to just 15% who viewed it as a negative for the local economy. The remainder of those polled foresaw little or no economic effect.

Furthermore, exactly half of all people polled felt that legalizing marijuana use would have “not much effect” on the number of violent crimes committed. Comparatively, 20% expected a decrease, while 26% forecast an increase in violent crimes with increased cannabis use.

A row of voting booths with pamphlets attached.

IMAGE SOURCE: GETTY IMAGES.

Marijuana isn’t viewed as a political game changer

Each and every one of these data points would appear to be a selling point for federal reform. Americans overwhelmingly favor legalization, believe it’s helping their local economies, and don’t think cannabis use will lead to more violent crimes. And yet, it remains an illicit substance at the federal level.

The reason? According to the CBS News poll, 56% of Americans questioned said their presidential candidate’s support for legal marijuana wouldn’t make a difference in their vote. Meanwhile, 21% suggested they’re more likely to vote for a candidate who supports legalizing weed, with an equal 21% less likely to vote for a candidate who supports legalizing pot. Put in another context, a majority of the public may have an opinion on whether they believe cannabis should be legal or not, but the stance their candidate takes won’t be enough to sway their vote.

A 2018 survey from the independent Quinnipiac University yielded a very similar finding. Quinnipiac posed the following question to its respondents:

“If you agreed with a political candidate on other issues, but not on the issue of legalizing marijuana, do you think you could still vote for that candidate or not?”

A mere 13% of respondents affirmed that they wouldn’t vote for such a candidate, with a whopping 82% noting that they still would. Marijuana simply doesn’t have enough political clout on Capitol Hill to cause elected officials to lose their seats. This means there’s little rush for lawmakers to endorse the legalization movement, even if the public tide has dramatically shifted in favor of legalization in recent years.

A drug free zone sign posted in a quiet neighborhood.

IMAGE SOURCE: GETTY IMAGES.

Cannabis could remain illegal at the federal level for years to come

Even if voters won’t be making marijuana a single-voter issue, it doesn’t reduce the importance of the 2020 elections. On top of numerous states expected to vote on recreational cannabis, the federal government could see shake-ups at the congressional and presidential level. With Republicans having a historically more adverse view of cannabis than Democrats, hanging onto the Senate and/or Oval Office could doom pot to at least another two years without any chance of federal reform. In short, a lot is riding on next year’s elections.

Although there are plenty of ways for marijuana investors to make bank in the U.S. via the hemp and cannabidiol markets, a lack of progress on the federal cannabis front could certainly dent investors’ near-term expectations.

For example, last quarter we witnessed multistate cannabis operator Acreage Holdings(NASDAQOTH:ACRGF) fall by 20%, making it one of the 25 worst-performing cannabis stocks. Acreage, which has retail stores, grow farms, and processing sites in more states (20) than any other vertically integrated U.S.-focused pot stock, agreed to be acquired by Canopy Growth(NYSE:CGC), the largest marijuana stock in the world by market cap, in April.

The $3.4 billion cash-and-stock deal was made on a contingent-rights basis, with Canopy Growth paying $300 million in cash up front, and handing over $3.1 billion in stock later, upon the legalization of marijuana at the federal level in the United States. Although the deal has a roughly 90-month runway to occur, Republican wins in the Senate or Oval Office next year could possibly push back any chance of reform for another 24 months, at minimum. Canopy Growth might look to have an easy in to the United States’ burgeoning pot market, but there’s no guarantee that the contingent rights of the deal with Acreage will be met anytime soon, if ever.

Until marijuana becomes more of a single-voter issue, there’s little chance of real federal reform in the United States.

Sean Williams has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has no position in any of the stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool has a disclosure policy.

Texas Lawmakers Will Vote On Marijuana Decriminalization This Week

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF ‘MARIJUANA MOMENT’)

 

Texas Lawmakers Will Vote On Marijuana Decriminalization This Week

Published

on

The Texas House is scheduled to vote on a bill on Thursday that would make low-level marijuana possession punishable by a fine with no jail time.

The development comes one month after the House Criminal Jurisprudence Committee approved the decriminalization legislation in a 5-2 vote.

Under the bill, possession of one ounce or less of marijuana would be punishable by a $250 fine for the first two offenses, and it would be considered a class C misdemeanor for subsequent offenses, which is a lower penalty than is the case under current law.

Currently, possession of two ounces or less is a class B misdemeanor that carries a fine of up to $2,000 and up to 180 days in jail. That’s in addition to a permanent criminal record, which carries steep, long-term consequences.

“Regardless of political affiliation, Texans are in support of reducing penalties for low-level marijuana possession,” Heather Fazio, director of Texans for Responsible Marijuana Policy, told Marijuana Moment. “We want to see our valuable public safety resources used in a better way and we don’t want a simple marijuana charge to keep people from going to school or participating in the workforce.”

Despite the state’s reputation as a conservative stronghold, cannabis reform is advancing in several forms through the Texas legislature. That includes legislation to legalize and regulate industrial hemp and its derivatives, which was approved by the House on Tuesday.

It also includes a bill to expand the state’s medical marijuana program, which unanimously cleared by a House committee last week.

The Texas Republican Party endorsed all three modest reform measures last year, though it stopped short of backing broader adult-use legalization.

Advocates are optimistic that the decriminalization bill will make it all the way to the desk of Gov. Greg Abbott (R), who has expressed openness to signing legislation to reduce penalties for simple possession.

This story has been updated to note the House’s passage of a hemp bill.

Photo courtesy of Mike Latimer.

Marijuana Moment is made possible with support from readers. If you rely on our cannabis advocacy journalism to stay informed, please consider a monthly Patreon pledge.

Ideals For A Third Party Platform Here In The U.S.

Ideals For A Third Party Platform Here In The U.S.

 

1.) The Supreme Court decides the policy on abortion, not a politician.

2.) Guns and/or ammunition can not be outlawed from the public. To me, the only exception should be such things as machineguns. Grenades, C-4 and such weapons should be banned unless you have a specific permit to own them, like with a licensed collector.

3.) Recreational marijuana should be just as legal as alcohol, Federally! This government prohibition is just as ignorant and illegal as the prohibition of alcohol was in the 1930’s.

4.) Flat tax rate of 10% on all things, no write-offs, no exemptions, no loopholes. 6% Federal tax. 2% State tax. 1% each for County and City. I look at taxes this way, the Lord asks us to donate at least 10% toward Him which He requires us to help others with like our communities.

5.) All people running for any office must supply the prior 10 years of tax returns when they officially or unofficially announce they are ‘running’ for an Office.

6.) Mandatory retirement age for any Office of 72 years old. If a person is wanting to be elected to any office if they will turn 72 or older during that 2, 4 or 6 years then you are not allowed to be in that or any such Office. You say that is not legal that it is age discrimination, I say no, I believe you are incorrect. The reason is, you have to be a minimum of 35 to be allowed to be President. If that isn’t discrimination then neither is my idea of being to old.

Just a thought folks on what I would like to see as the Platform of a 3rd political party. so here it is.

The Truth for Kyle Brennan

Scientology & the Death of Kyle Brennan

Flavia Vinci

Now, Here and Somewhere else

ღ کچھ دل سے ღ

باتیں دل کی۔۔۔ کچھ کہی، کچھ ان کہی

haroonsblog

life is precious

Wanderlust and Wonderment

My writing and photo journey of inspiration and discovery

Naoko Takano

Personal Blog by @naokomc in Tokyo, Japan.

Melody Chen

Word-Experimentalist

%d bloggers like this: