Abbas Once Again Tries To Rewrite History

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE TIMES OF ISRAEL)

(COMMENTARY: ARE PRESIDENTS TRUMP AND ABBAS JUST BROTHERS WITH ANOTHER MOTHER? CERTAINLY THEY MUST BE, THEY ARE TWO OF THE MOST IGNORANT LOUD MOUTH IDIOTS WOMAN KIND HAS EVER HAD TO OFFER!)(trs)

 

Rewriting history, Abbas calls Israel a ‘colonial project’ unrelated to Judaism

In speech ignoring Jewish ties to holy land, PA head implies European Jews chose to die in Holocaust rather than go to Palestine; claims Ben-Gurion forced Mideast Jews to Israel

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas speaks during a meeting with the Palestinian Central Council, a top decision-making body, at his headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah, January 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed,l)

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas speaks during a meeting with the Palestinian Central Council, a top decision-making body, at his headquarters in the West Bank city of Ramallah, January 14, 2018. (AP Photo/Majdi Mohammed,l)

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas on Sunday night implied European Jews during the Holocaust chose to undergo “murder and slaughter” over emigration to British-held Palestine, and alleged that the State of Israel’s first prime minister David Ben-Gurion imported Jews from Yemen and Iraq to the country against their will.

The Palestinian leader further asserted that the State of Israel was formed as “a colonial project that has nothing to do with Judaism” to safeguard European interests.

The PA leader delivered a mini-lecture on his understanding of the history of Zionism on Sunday, claiming the Jewish state deliberately stirred trouble in Arab countries in order to forcibly move Middle Eastern Jews into the sparsely populated nascent state.

Abbas, in his address, made no mention of the Jews’ historic presence and periods of sovereignty in the holy land. Israel is the only place where the Jews have ever been sovereign or sought sovereignty.

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas (C) speaks during a meeting in the West Bank city of Ramallah on January 14, 2018. (AFP PHOTO / ABBAS MOMANI)

The comments were made near the beginning of a two-and-a-half hour speech by the Palestinian leader to a meeting of the Palestine Liberation Organization’s Central Council in Ramallah, which largely focused on a response to United States President Donald Trump’s decision to recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.

In response to the address, Israel’s Defense Minister Avigdor Liberman said on Monday that Abbas had “lost his senses.”

“Colonialism created Israel to perform a certain function. It is a colonial project that has nothing to do with Judaism, but rather used the Jews as a tool under the slogan of the Promised Land,” said Abbas, who added that he was borrowing from the scholarly work of Egyptian intellectual Abdel-Wahab El-Messiri. El-Messiri wrote an eight-volume Encyclopedia of Jews, Judaism and Zionism.

Once the State of Israel was created, Abbas maintained, Israeli leaders were hard-pressed to get Jews to immigrate to the country.

The Palestinian leader suggested the Jews of Europe — six million of whom would be killed by the Nazis — chose to remain in their home countries during the Holocaust, rather than emigrate.

“The Jews did not want to emigrate even with murder and slaughter. Even during the Holocaust, they did not emigrate. By 1948, Jews in Palestine were no more than 640,000, most of them from Europe,” he said.

In fact, from 1939 to 1945, the British mandatory authorities prevented almost all Jewish immigration to Palestine, at the behest of the Arab states.

In order to fill the nascent Jewish state, Abbas asserted, that Ben-Gurion begrudgingly began bringing Jews from Arab lands to Israel by force.

“Ben-Gurion did not want Middle Eastern Jews to come [to Israel]…but when he saw the vast land, he was forced to bring Middle Eastern Jews… that didn’t want to come. From Yemen they flew 50,000 Jews…They didn’t suffice with 50,000 Jews. Then they went to Iraq, which had large reserves of Jews,” said Abbas.

Some 49,000 Yemeni Jews were brought to the nascent State of Israel in Operation Magic Carpet in 1949-50.

Illustrative: Jews of Aden awaiting evacuation to Israel on November 1, 1949. (GPO/Public domain)

Abbas claimed the Israelis cut deals with the Iraqi politicians “to take away the citizenship of Jews and force them to emigrate.”

“They did not suffice with this and gathered all the Jews in Arab countries, from Morocco to Algeria and Tunis, Libya, Egypt, Syria and Lebanon,” Abbas said.

The establishment of the Jewish state in 1949 was met with violent riots, looting, and attacks on local Jewish populations in countries throughout the Middle East, including Yemen, Iraq, Syria, and Egypt.

Some 900,000 Jews fled, or were forced to flee, their homelands following the creation of the State of Israel. As a result, the Jewish population of the Middle East (excluding Israel) and North Africa shrank from 856,000 to just 4,400 today.

In his remarks, Abbas noted the PLO organization rallied against the 100th anniversary of the Balfour Declaration, a British declaration that called for the establishment of a Jewish homeland in historic Palestine.

Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas (C-R) speaks during a meeting in the West Bank city of Ramallah, on January 14, 2018. (AFP PHOTO / ABBAS MOMANI)

Yet, according to the Palestinian leader, the history of the British-Jewish connection to Palestine actually reaches back to the rule of Oliver Cromwell in 1653.

“He thought of moving the Jews from Europe to the Middle East, to this region, because they wanted this region to be a frontier to protect convoys and interests coming from Europe to the East,” Abbas said of Cromwell, whose plan never came to fruition.

Abbas then traced the history of European colonialism in Palestine from Napoleon Bonaparte, who also said the Jews should have a state in their historic homeland, through American attempts to set up colonies in the 1850, first with local Palestinian Jews, then with American Christians.

Arriving at the story of Theodor Herzl, considered the father of modern Zionism, Abbas said Herzl was primarily interested in setting up a Jewish homeland in order to aid European Jews. Focusing on the early Zionist slogan, “A land without a people for a people without a land,” Abbas claimed the father of Zionism had called for genocide of the local Arab population.

Abbas alleged that when Herzl visited Palestine and saw people living there, the father of Zionism said: “We must wipe out the Palestinians from Palestine so that Palestine will be a land without a people for a people without a land.”

The Zionist leader is not known to have advocated for the ethnic cleansing of the Palestinians.

Famous picture of Theodor Herzl on the balcony of the Hotel Les Trois Rois in Basel, Switzerland (photo credit: CC-PD-Mark, by Wikigamad, Wikimedia Commons)

Famous picture of Theodor Herzl on the balcony of the Hotel Les Trois Rois in Basel, Switzerland (photo credit: CC-PD-Mark, by Wikigamad, Wikimedia Commons)

Times of Israel staff contributed to this report.

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Trump threatens stop to Palestinian aid over Jerusalem row

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE BBC)

 

Trump threatens stop to Palestinian aid over Jerusalem row

President Trump photographed outdoors in mid-sentenceImage copyrightREUTERS
Image captionMr Trump’s comments suggest he is planning to pull Palestinian aid funding

The US may stop aid payments to Palestinians who are “no long willing to talk peace”, President Trump said.

On Twitter, Mr Trump said the United States received “no appreciation or respect” in return for its aid.

He also said his controversial recognition of the contested city of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital took the hugely divisive issue “off the table” for new peace talks.

Palestinians had said the move showed the US could not be a neutral broker.

The decision in December was also overwhelmingly condemned at the United Nations, where 128 countries voted against Mr Trump’s fulfilment of a campaign promise.

What did President Trump say?

The US President was tweeting a follow-up to earlier comments about aid payments to Pakistan, in which he said the US has received only “lies and deceit” in exchange for billions of dollars in aid.

“It’s not only Pakistan that we pay billions of dollars to for nothing,” the president began his tweet on Tuesday evening.

“As an example, we pay the Palestinians hundred of millions of dollars a year and get no appreciation or respect. They don’t even want to negotiate a long overdue peace treaty with Israel,” he said.

“We have taken Jerusalem, the toughest part of the negotiation, off the table, but Israel, for that, would have had to pay more.

“But with the Palestinians no longer willing to talk peace, why should we make any of these massive future payments to them?”

What have the Palestinians said to anger the US?

Media captionWhy the city of Jerusalem matters

Jerusalem is one of the world’s most contested sites.

Israel claims the whole of the city as its capital. The Palestinians want East Jerusalem, occupied by Israel in the 1967 Middle East war, to be the capital of a future Palestinian state.

Mr Trump, however, decided to formally recognise Jerusalem as Israel’s capital, despite being warned it could cause unrest in the region.

He also said he would move the US embassy there from Tel Aviv, where all other nations have their consulates.

After the announcement, Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas said he would no longer accept any proposals from Mr Trump’s government.

“The United States has proven to be a dishonest mediator in the peace process,” he said.

He also called Jerusalem the “eternal capital of the state of Palestine”.

What kind of aid does the US send to Palestinians?

Mr Trump’s tweets followed remarks from Nikki Haley, the US envoy to the United Nations, in which she said the US would stop contributing to the UN’s relief agency for Palestinian refugees.

The agency runs education, health, and social programmes. The United States is its largest governmental donor, handing over almost $370m (£270m) in 2016.

Speaking at a news conference, Ms Haley said: “The President has basically said that he doesn’t want to give any additional funding, or stop funding, until the Palestinians are agreeing to come back to the negotiation table.”

Nikki Haley points to a reporter off-camera at a media briefing in the UN, New York CityImage copyrightGETTY IMAGES
Image captionThe United Nations’ overwhelming condemnation was “not helpful”, Ms Haley said

She said the UN’s vote to condemn Mr Trump’s Jerusalem decision was “not helpful to the situation”.

“The Palestinians now have to show their will that they want to come to the table. As of now, they’re not coming to the table but they asked for aid.

“We’re not giving the aid, we’re going to make sure that they come to the table,” she said.

The withdrawal of aid is likely to have a significant impact on the UN agency’s work, as the US contributes almost 30% of its overall funding.

In 2016, the second-largest donor, the European Union, donated less than half as much as the US.

2,700-year-old seal impression cements existence of biblical Jerusalem governor

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE TIMES OF ISRAEL)

 

THE BIBLE MENTIONS TWO GOVERNORS OF JERUSALEM BY NAME

2,700-year-old seal impression cements existence of biblical Jerusalem governor

Found in ongoing Western Wall plaza excavations, the minuscule clay piece is inscribed in ancient Hebrew script, ‘Belonging to the governor of the city’

  • Found 100 meters from Jerusalem's Western Wall, the First Temple period sealing published in December 2017 bears an inscription stating, 'Belonging to the Governor of the City.' (Clara Amit, Israel Antiquities Authority)
    Found 100 meters from Jerusalem’s Western Wall, the First Temple period sealing published in December 2017 bears an inscription stating, ‘Belonging to the Governor of the City.’ (Clara Amit, Israel Antiquities Authority)
  • The presentation of the seal impression bearing the inscription 'Belonging to the governor of the city' to Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat in December 2017. (Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority)
    The presentation of the seal impression bearing the inscription ‘Belonging to the governor of the city’ to Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat in December 2017. (Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority)
  • The IAA excavations in Jerusalem's Western Wall plaza, where the First Temple period sealing, bearing the inscription 'Belonging to the Governor of the City' was uncovered, and published in December 2017. (Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah)
    The IAA excavations in Jerusalem’s Western Wall plaza, where the First Temple period sealing, bearing the inscription ‘Belonging to the Governor of the City’ was uncovered, and published in December 2017. (Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah)
  • Dr. Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah, director of the excavations at the Western Wall plaza on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, holds the rare First Temple sealing her team published in December 2017. (Yoli Shwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority)
    Dr. Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah, director of the excavations at the Western Wall plaza on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, holds the rare First Temple sealing her team published in December 2017. (Yoli Shwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority)

Past and present collided last week when an extremely rare seal impression discovered in Jerusalem’s Western Wall plaza and bearing the inscription “Belonging to the governor of the city” was presented to Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat.

According to site excavator Dr. Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah, “This is the first time that such an impression was found in an authorized excavation. It supports the biblical rendering of the existence of a governor of the city in Jerusalem 2,700 years ago.”

At the presentation, Barkat said, “It is very overwhelming to receive greetings from First Temple-period Jerusalem. This shows that already 2,700 years ago, Jerusalem, the capital of Israel, was a strong and central city.”

The presentation of the sealing bearing the inscription ‘Belonging to the governor of the city’ to Jerusalem Mayor Nir Barkat in December 2017. From right to left: Dr. Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah, excavator on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority; Nir Barkat, mayor of Jerusalem; Dr. Yuval Baruch, head of the Jerusalem Region at the Israel Antiquities Authority; and Herzl Ben Ari, general manager of the Jewish Quarter Development Company. (Yoli Schwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority)

The minuscule clay seal impression, or docket, was found while researchers were examining the dust from a First Temple structure 100 meters northwest of the Western Wall at a site the Israel Antiquity Authorities has been excavating since 2005. The excavations have offered up insights into Jerusalem’s Second Temple and Roman periods, as well as a massive Iron Age four-room building where an eclectic collection of six other seals were uncovered, whose origins point to a thriving cosmopolitan Iron Age center or settlement.

“The seal impression had been attached to an important transport and served as some sort of logo, or as a tiny souvenir, which was sent on behalf of the governor of the city,” said Weksler-Bdolah in an IAA release.

The IAA excavations in Jerusalem’s Western Wall plaza, where the First Temple period sealing, bearing the inscription ‘Belonging to the governor of the city’ was discovered and published in December 2017. (Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah)

The site, which faces the Western Wall plaza, was once earmarked as the future home of a Western Wall Heritage Foundation’s Beit HaLiba until Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu suspended the controversial museum “over security concerns” in 2015. However, in light of the “outstanding significance” of the finds at the excavation site, according to Dr. Yuval Baruch, archaeologist of the Jerusalem District in the IAA, a decision was made”to conserve the First Temple-period building exposed in the Western Wall plaza excavations and open it to visitors.”

The clay impression was discovered in dust after Israel Antiquity Authority conservationists scratched at the surface of the First Temple period building’s walls to inject preservation materials. The dust that fell from between the ancient stones was taken to the IAA labs for wet sifting.

At the IAA labs in Jerusalem’s Har Hotzvim technology park, Shimon Cohen spotted the seal impression about a year ago. The small (13 x 15 mm and 2–3 mm thick) fired lump of clay bears an image and inscription. On the upper portion of the impression, two figures wearing striped garments face each other. Between them is what could be a moon, according to excavation head Weksler-Bdolah.

Over the past year, the impression was studied by Hebrew University Prof. Tallay Ornan and Tel Aviv University Prof. Benjamin Sass. According to their analysis, “above a double line are two standing men, facing each other in a mirror-like manner. Their heads are depicted as large dots, lacking any details. The hands facing outward are dropped down, and the hands facing inward are raised. Each of the figures is wearing a striped, knee-length garment.”

Found 100 meters from Jerusalem’s Western Wall, the First Temple period sealing published in December 2017 bears an inscription stating, ‘Belonging to the governor of the city.’ (Clara Amit, Israel Antiquities Authority)

The bottom section reads, in early Hebrew script: “Belonging to the governor [sar] of the city.” Weksler-Bdolah explains that the governor most likely functioned much like today’s mayor. The role is referenced in the Hebrew Bible: in 2 Kings, Joshua is listed as the governor of the city in the days of Hezekiah, and in 2 Chronicles, Maaseiah is noted as governor of the city in the days of Josiah.

“The Bible mentions two governors of Jerusalem, and this finding thus reveals that such a position was actually held by someone in the city some 2700 years ago, said Weksler-Bdolah.

The initial discovery of the First Temple structure came as a surprise to Weksler-Bdolah, who until then had been digging up Second Temple and Roman-era finds. However, as the team excavated more north, after a longstanding police building was removed, “All of a sudden we saw that there was no more bedrock. It disappeared.” In a 2010 interview, she described continuing the excavation and discovering that “the minute we took away the Early Islamic eighth-century plaster installations [from under the police building]… immediately, in 20 centimeters — ‘one basket of dirt’ archaeologically speaking — we went from the eighth-century A.D. to the eighth century B.C.”

Her team discovered a four-room structure facing the Temple Mount, constructed on the slopes of the upper hill, which according to the remains of the building and its floors, was dated to the seventh century BCE.

The IAA excavations in Jerusalem’s Western Wall plaza, where the First Temple period sealing, bearing the inscription ‘Belonging to the governor of the city’ was uncovered, and published in December 2017. (Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah)

According to the 2010 article, the structure, which was ruined in a collapse, is “typical of the buildings of the Israelites and also in Judea. There was one broad room and three elongated rooms perpendicular to it. The one broad room is divided with walls into three sections, three smaller room.”

Weksler-Bdolah believes that due to its location and the eclectic group of artifacts found there — from Egypt and Assyria — the building “probably served as an administration center. The people who gave orders may have had to sign documents here. It may also have been a place for the rich, the more important people, because the location is really important.”

The recent additional find is more evidence for this hypothesis. “The finding of the impression with this high-rank title, in addition to the large assemblage of actual seals found in the building in the past, supports the assumption that this area, located on the western slopes of the western hill of ancient Jerusalem, some 100 meters west of the Temple Mount, was inhabited by highly ranked officials during the First Temple period,” said Weksler-Bdolah this week.

Dr. Shlomit Weksler-Bdolah, director of the excavations at the Western Wall plaza on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, with the rare First Temple seal impression her team published in December 2017. (Yoli Shwartz, Israel Antiquities Authority)

The seal impression was presented to Mayor Barkat during a visit to Davidson’s Center, near the Western Wall, last week. After the completion of the scientific research, the impression will be on temporary exhibit in the mayor’s office.

“Jerusalem is one of the most ancient capitals of the world, continually populated by the Jewish people for more than 3,000 years. Today we have the privilege to encounter another one of the long chain of persons and leaders that built and developed the city. We are grateful to be living in a city with such a magnificent past, and are obligated to ensure its strength for generations to come, as we daily do,” said Barkat.

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US envoy said to ask State Department to stop calling West Bank ‘occupied’

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE TIMES OF ISRAEL)

 

US envoy said to ask State Department to stop calling West Bank ‘occupied’

Washington reportedly refuses David Friedman’s request to change terminology, but Trump will have the final say

American Ambassador to Israel David Friedman attends a meeting of the lobby for Israel–United States relations at the Knesset, July 25, 2017. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

American Ambassador to Israel David Friedman attends a meeting of the lobby for Israel–United States relations at the Knesset, July 25, 2017. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

US Ambassador to Israel David Friedman has reportedly asked the US State Department to stop using the term “occupied” in official documents referring to Israeli control over the West Bank.

According to a report by the Kan public broadcaster on Tuesday, the State Department refused.

However, due to pressure “from above” the two sides agreed that the issue will be discussed again and that US President Donald Trump will have the final say, the report said.

Friedman has in the past run afoul of his State Department superiors over his views on the West Bank.

In September, the US State Department publicly rejected remarks he made pertaining to Israel’s presence in the West Bank as not reflective of the administration’s stance.

At the time, spokesperson Heather Nauert told reporters that Friedman’s comments in an interview with the Hebrew-media Walla news website, in which he said he considers West Bank settlements to be part of Israelshould “not be read as a shift in US policy.”

Earlier the same month Nauert was forced to clarify another statement Friedman made to Israeli media, in which he referred to Israel’s “alleged occupation” of the West Bank.

“Our position on that hasn’t changed,” Nauert told reporters. “The comment does not represent a shift in US policy.”

A general view of the West Bank settlement of Beit El near Ramallah, February 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Tsafrir Abayov)

In the past, Friedman has been a staunch supporter of the settlement movement. Before taking up his post as ambassador, he served as president of American Friends of Bet El Institutions, an organization that supports the large West Bank settlement near Ramallah, and he has a long history of excoriating groups who criticize Israel’s settlement policy.

Friedman’s reported directive came weeks after Trump shifted decades of US policy and recognized Jerusalem as Israel’s capital on December 6.

In an address from the White House, Trump defied worldwide warnings and insisted that after repeated failures to achieve peace, a new approach was long overdue. The president described his decision to recognize Jerusalem as the seat of Israel’s government as merely based on reality.

The move was hailed by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and by leaders across much of the Israeli political spectrum. Trump stressed that he was not specifying the boundaries of Israeli sovereignty in the city, and called for no change in the status quo at the city’s holy sites.

Agencies contributed to this report.

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Iran Pledging All Its Might To Hamas For Jerusalem Battle

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE TIMES OF ISRAEL)

 

Iran pledging all its might to Hamas for Jerusalem battle, terror group says

‘All of our of capabilities and potential are at your disposal,’ Gaza leader Sinwar says General Qassem Soleimani told him

Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh (L) and Hamas's leader in the Gaza Strip Yahya Sinwar wave during a rally marking the 30th anniversary of the founding of the Islamist terror movement, in Gaza City, on December 14, 2017. (MOHAMMED ABED / AFP)

Hamas leader Ismail Haniyeh (L) and Hamas’s leader in the Gaza Strip Yahya Sinwar wave during a rally marking the 30th anniversary of the founding of the Islamist terror movement, in Gaza City, on December 14, 2017. (MOHAMMED ABED / AFP)

Hamas’s leader in the Gaza Strip, Yahya Sinwar, said that a senior Iranian military commander pledged all of the Islamic Republic’s military resources to help the Gaza-based terror group fight Israel over Jerusalem.

“All our of capabilities and potential are at your disposal in the battle for the defense of Jerusalem,” Sinwar said Qassem Soleimani, the commander of Iran’s Islamic Revolutionary Guards Corps’ elite Quds Force, told him over the phone.

The statements by Sinwar regarding Soleimani were broadcast Monday by the pro-Iranian Lebanese news outlet al-Mayadeen, and seemed to be from a speech he gave on Thursday in Gaza to young men and social media activists.

According to Sinwar, Soleimani asserted that “Iran, the Revolutionary Guards and Quds Force stand with all they have with our people in order to defend Jerusalem so that Jerusalem will endure as the capital of the state of Palestine.”

Iranian Revolutionary Guards al-Quds Force commander Maj. Gen. Qassem Soleimani (YouTube: BBC Newsnight)

Sinwar, who said he met with the Iranian military commander in Tehran in 2012, added that Soleimani was in touch with the leadership of the military branches of both Hamas and Palestinian Islamic Jihad.

In a move that delighted much of Israel’s leadership but ignited protests across the Muslim world, US President Donald Trump announced on December 6 that the US recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and planned to move its embassy there from Tel Aviv. Trump stressed that he was not specifying the boundaries of Israeli sovereignty in the city, and called for no change in the status quo at the city’s holy sites.

Hamas, which seeks the destruction of Israel, has fought three wars with the Jewish state since seizing power from Fatah in the Gaza Strip in 2007.

The terror group has been urging a new intifada, or uprising, since Trump’s declaration, and has encouraged thousands of Gazans to confront Israeli troops at the Gaza border fence, where there have been several fatalities in clashes in recent weeks.

Hamas operative Saleh al-Arouri (2nd-R) meets with Iranian official Hossein Amir Abdollahian (R) and other Hamas operatives in Lebanon on August 1, 2017. (Official Hamas media)

In recent months, Hamas has publicly flaunted its burgeoning ties with Iran, and the Islamic Republic has in turn sworn to increase its military backing for the Gaza-based terror group.

Sinwar has said that Iran has become the key military sponsor for the Gaza-based terror group, though he has not explained in what capacity Tehran provides support.

In November, a high-profile Hamas delegation visited Iran in order to attend the funeral service for Soleimani’s father. The delegation included deputy political chief Saleh al-Arouri and a second official, Ezzat al-Rishq.

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Guatemala Played A Key Role In The Jewish State’s Creation

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE TIMES OF ISRAEL)

 

Why a small Central American nation became a trailblazer on Jerusalem

Guatemala played a key role in the Jewish state’s creation and has enjoyed Israeli security assistance ever since. It doesn’t hurt that its leader is deeply religious

Raphael Ahren

Guatemala's new ambassador to Israel, Dr. Juan Garcia Granados leaving the President's Residence in Jerusalem after presenting his credentials, July 1955 (Moshe Pridan/GPO)

Guatemala’s new ambassador to Israel, Dr. Juan Garcia Granados leaving the President’s Residence in Jerusalem after presenting his credentials, July 1955 (Moshe Pridan/GPO)

On Sunday, Guatemala became the first country after the US to announce its intention to move its embassy in Israel to Jerusalem, a move seen as tantamount to recognizing the city as Israel’s capital, though President Jimmy Morales’s statement included no explicit recognition.

Predictably, the Central American nation’s decision was castigated by the Palestinians and other Arab states and hailed in Israel as an act of deep friendship that marked the beginning of a new trend. Neighbor Honduras is said to be next in line. Like Guatemala, it also voted last week against the United Nations General Assembly resolution condemning the US’s December 6 decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and move its embassy there.

Other countries — Togo, Paraguay, Romania, Slovakia — are also said to be considering following in Guatemala’s footsteps in bucking decades-old diplomatic dogma to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

But what prompted a relatively small nation far removed from the Middle East and its problems to be the first to take the plunge after the US?

There are several reasons for Guatemala’s dramatic step. The country’s well-established historic friendship with Israel and ongoing deep security and trade ties are one key part of the story. The personal character of the country’s current leader is the other.

Seventy years ago, Guatemala’s ambassador to the UN, Dr. Jorge Garcia Granados, a member of the United Nations Special Committee on Palestine, played a crucial role in convincing Latin American countries to vote in favor of General Assembly Resolution 181, which called for the partition of Mandatory Palestine into a Jewish state and an Arab state.

File photo of the vote on the United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine or United Nations General Assembly Resolution 181 on November 29, 1947 (photo credit: Israeli Government Press Office)

The vote on the United Nations Partition Plan for Palestine or United Nations General Assembly Resolution 181 on November 29, 1947. (Israeli Government Press Office/File)

“It could be that without Guatemala, the resolution on that fateful day would not have passed, and history would be very different,” Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein told Morales during his November 2016 visit to Israel.

At the time, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu recalled that he had grown up in Jerusalem near a street named after Morales’s country. “In just about every town in Israel there is a Guatemala Street because we remember Guatemala’s friendship and the friendship and leadership of your UN ambassador at the time of the decision on the Partition Resolution, and so Guatemala was etched into our hearts then,” he said.

Guatemala was one of the first countries to recognize the nascent State of Israel in 1948, and the friendship has remained strong ever since.

Telegrams of recognition of the State of Israel sent by Guatemala, Finland and Romania (courtesy GPO)

In the 1970s, Israel was said to have assisted the military juntas ruling Guatemala a great deal in the area of counterinsurgency, providing them with advice and equipment.

“Israeli-Guatemalan military cooperation began in 1971, during the presidency of Col. Carlos Arana Osario,” political scientist Cheryl Rubenberg wrote in a 1986 article on bilateral relations.

“Then the Guatemalan chief of staff, Kjell Laugerud Garcia, visited Israel and met with Defense Minister Moshe Dayan and other Israeli military officials. Laugerud Garcia expressed Guatemala’s interest in procuring armaments and military communications equipment. Later that year, the two countries signed their first cooperation agreement, though specifics were not made public,” she wrote.

Guatemala saw the Jewish state “as the world’s foremost practitioner of counterinsurgency” and looked to Jerusalem for expertise and arms, according to Rubenberg. “Israeli assistance began in 1971, but it took on increased importance after 1977, when the Guatemalan generals rejected US military aid in response to Carter administration pressures to remedy their gross human rights violations.”

Later that year, Israeli president Ephraim Katzir spent a week in Guatemala City, where he signed an agreement on military assistance.

Three years later, the Knesset passed a law declaring that united Jerusalem was Israel’s capital, leading the Security Council to call on all countries to withdraw their embassies from the city. Guatemala heeded the call and moved its embassy to Herzliya.

Relations with Israel remained strong, however. At least 300 Israeli security “advisers” were said to have operated in Guatemala in the early 1980s. “Israel is known to have intelligence teams, security and communications specialists, and military training personnel in Guatemala,” The New York Times reported at the time, though Israeli diplomats denied such claims.

Ties were also strong in the fields of civilian technology and tourism, among others.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President of Guatemala Otto Pérez Molina at Netanyahu’s office in Jerusalem. December 9, 2013. (Miriam Alster/Flash90)

In December 2013, Otto Fernando Perez Molina became the first president of Guatemala to visit Israel. “Guatemala did participate in the foundation of Israel, so that has led the foundations for a tradition and the unity between our two peoples,” he told Netanyahu at the time.

Fast forward to 2015, when Morales — a former comedian who’d never held political office — won the country’s presidential elections with 67 percent of the votes. Morales, a devout Evangelical, has been called “the Donald Trump of Guatemala.” In 2016, Guatemala received nearly $300 million in aid from the US.

Morales, who called his country’s relationship with Israel “excellent,” has been supportive of many of the current US administration’s policies, including Trump’s plan to build a border wall with Mexico, and, of course, his plan to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales (R) and wife Gilda Marroquin visit the Hall of Names at Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in Jerusalem on November 28, 2016. (AFP/Gali Tibbon)

On his visit to Israel last year — during which he received an honorary doctorate from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem — he announced his hope to strengthen bilateral cooperation in many fields.

“Guatemala has a special relationship with Israel, and we know we can continue to work together: in partnership and hand in hand,” he told President Reuven Rivlin in Jerusalem. “During our visit we hope we will be able to enjoy Israel’s rich culture and history, and learn from you how to improve in the areas of agriculture, husbandry, and technology — areas in which Israel excels.”

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First Judeo-Christian Crusade for Jerusalem

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HUFFINGTON POST)

 

First Judeo-Christian Crusade for Jerusalem

12/25/2017 01:32 pm ET

PIXABAY
Fragile Peace

The word Crusade is associated with the European Christians of Middle Ages. The declared purpose of the European Crusades was to reclaim Jerusalem from Muslims. Currently, a Judeo-Christian Crusade is underway to consolidate the territorial claims of Israel, a state instituted by the European Jews with the support of the European Christians, in lands that constitute historical Palestine. Since 1948, the European Jews have occupied some parts of Palestine through a colonial gift from Great Britain and some parts through wars and settlements. Jerusalem, however, is still a disputed city. The Jews, supported by Evangelical Christians, claim exclusive and complete authority over Jerusalem as the eternal capital of Israel.

On December 6, 2017, the United States officially recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. This recognition alters the nature of the conflict from an Israeli-Palestinian issue to a grand conflict between Jews and Muslims. Muslims willing to recognize Israel are refusing to recognize the Jewish sovereignty over entire Jerusalem. The 56 Muslim nations spanning from Morocco to Indonesia reject the Jewish claim over Jerusalem, as do some other nations, including France, Germany, Italy, and Spain, the nations that themselves conducted the Christian Crusades of the Middle Ages.

A brief comparative study of the First Christian Crusade and the First Judeo-Christian Crusade furnishes profound historical insights and may even predict the probable future course of the conflict. It appears that the Muslims would strive to reverse the gains of the Judeo-Christian Crusade as they did those of the Christian Crusades. However, numerous complicating factors thicken the plot.

First Christian Crusade (1099)

In 636, four years after the Prophet Muhammad’s death, Muslims conquered Jerusalem, a city located in the Christian Byzantium province called Palestina Prima. From thereon, the European Christians, particularly the Franks, were determined to reconquer the city by all means necessary. For them, Jerusalem was the sacred town where Jesus was born, crucified, rose from the dead to the heavens, and “would return to the earth with the great sound of a trumpet.” On July 15, 1099, four hundred and sixty-three years after the Muslim conquest, the European Crusaders seized Jerusalem from the Fatimid Caliphate headquartered in Cairo. However, the Crusaders refused to cede the city to the Byzantium, the pre-Islamic sovereign of Jerusalem.

Warfare needs theories. Peter the Hermit (1050-1115) theorized that the chaos in the world prevailed because Muslims ruled Jerusalem and that reclaiming the holy city from the heathens would bring peace to humanity. Acting upon the Hermit’s theory, the European Christians plotted to cleanse Jerusalem of all nonbelievers, Muslims, and Jews, for the exclusive domination of the Christians. The merciless massacre of Jews and Muslims living in Palestine was defended in the name of Deus Vult (God wills it.)

Peter the Hermit might have been far less influential than the credit he receives in European history. Yet the First Crusade transformed European Christianity. The crusading theology discarded the New Testament teaching of turning the other cheek and promoted a notion of pitiless warfare for “just causes” turning Europe into a killing machine for centuries to come. The expulsions and the holocaust of Jews, the colonization of the Middle East, and the current Islamophobia in Europe are the revival shocks of the Hermit’s theorization.

Since God works in mysterious ways, the Hermit’s crusading theology flopped to bring peace to the world and God declined to keep Jerusalem under the Christian hegemony. The Christian Kingdom of Jerusalem came to an abrupt termination in less than a hundred years. In 1187, Saladin, a Kurdish Muslim military leader, recaptured Jerusalem. For centuries onward, Jerusalem would remain under the control of various Muslim dynasties. In the 20th century, however, the European Christians and the European Jews joined hands, the first time in history, to defeat Muslims occupying the holy land.

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First Judeo-Christian Crusade

It is unclear how to date the first Judeo-Christian Crusade to recapture Jerusalem from Muslims. Some might date it from the November 1917 Balfour Declaration when the United Kingdom, then at war with the Ottoman Empire, promised to establish a homeland for Jews in Palestine, an Ottoman territory. Some might date it from May 1948, when Israel was declared an independent state. Some might date it from June 1967, when the Jews defeated the Arab armies and conquered East Jerusalem and other Muslim territories. Some might date it from December 2017 when the United States recognized Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. November 1917 is most certainly the date for the public declaration of the first Judeo-Christian Crusade. June 1967 is a more realistic date for the actual conquest of Jerusalem. December 2017 is significant because this is when the United States abandoned its false neutrality and openly sided with the Jews against the Muslims.

Whatever date is the origin of the Judeo-Christian Crusade, this is the first time that Jews and Christians have come together to take Palestine and Jerusalem away from the Muslims.

Even though many Christian nations are divided over the final status of Jerusalem, their support of Israel as a replacement state in Palestine has been loud and clear. The United States and many other Christian nations support Israel in its wars with Muslim countries. Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Libya, and Yemen have been deliberately destroyed to strengthen the foothold of Israel in the region. Iran is next in line. Saudi Arabia, Egypt, and some other Muslim countries have been compromised in favor of Israel by non-representative governments, monetary incentives, and military threats.

Since Israel is militarily invincible, Muslims cannot take back Jerusalem by force. For all practical purposes, Jerusalem is already under the exclusive control of Jews, what Israel calls “the truth.” Jerusalem is home to Israel’s legislature, its Supreme Court, and the prime minister. In recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, President Trump says, “This is nothing more or less than a recognition of reality.” Thus, Jerusalem is a disputed city only in unenforceable U.N. resolutions. The Jews are doing whatever they can to slowly but steadily remove the defiant Muslim residents of the city through settlements, demolition of houses, and purchases of real property.

Complicating Factors

It is unclear whether Muslims have now lost Jerusalem and Palestine for all times to come. The Muslim defeat appears to be a foregone conclusion, a fact on the ground. The European and other Christian countries seem to have made a commitment to the survival of Israel. Muslim countries neighboring Israel, which refused to recognize Israel, have been decimated. Nations, such as Iran, which oppose the existence of Israel, have been marked out for retaliation. Efforts are underway to foment a grinding war between Shias and Sunnis to further eliminate any unified Muslim threat to Israel. Muslim militants who oppose the Jewish sovereignty over Palestine are universally condemned as terrorists. Right now, Muslim militants are fighting their own governments. Taking Jerusalem as a flashpoint, it is likely that the militants will begin to fight Israel.

Furthermore, the demographics pose the greatest threat to Israel. Within Israel, nearly 20% of the population is Muslim of various denominations. These Muslims, more than a million, are Israeli citizens. In Gaza and West Bank, the areas under Israeli occupation, nearly five million Muslims refuse to accept Israel as a legitimate state. Another five million descendants of the Palestinian refugees live in Jordan and Lebanon, dreaming the right to return to the land of their ancestors displaced in 1948. Periodically, intifada is likely to erupt to revive resistance to Israeli occupation.

It is also unclear whether all Muslims nations will ever recognize Israel as a lawful state. It is also likely that Muslims nations that have recognized Israel, such as Egypt and Jordan, may come under popular pressure from their peoples to reverse recognition. Brewing militancy, threats of the intifada, and the dynamics of Muslim non-recognition of Israel demonstrate that the Judeo-Christian Crusade for the control of Palestine and Jerusalem faces an unpredictable future.

Ali Khan is the author of Shariah and Sufism (2017) and Flexibility under Islamic L

Guatemala announces it will move its embassy in Israel to Jerusalem

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CBS NEWS)

 

Guatemala announces it will move its embassy in Israel to Jerusalem

Last Updated Dec 25, 2017 10:55 AM EST

GUATEMALA CITY — Guatemala’s president announced on Christmas Eve that the Central American country will move its embassy in Israel to Jerusalem, becoming the first nation to follow the lead of U.S. President Donald Trump in ordering the change.

Guatemala was one of nine nations that voted with the United States and Israel on Thursday when the U.N. General Assembly overwhelmingly adopted a non-binding resolution denouncing Trump’s recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital.

Trump didn’t set any timetable for moving the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, and neither did Guatemalan President Jimmy Morales.

In a post on his official Facebook account Sunday, Morales said that after talks with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, he decided to instruct Guatemala’s foreign ministry to move the embassy.

https://www.cbsnews.com/amp/embed/video/?v=59a30cbcf777ad3bb4122d780e977e93265d8276#xVf5j6M2FP5XLH7oIcUEAgESaVW1s92j3Z1OO0dbLVVksAmegE1tk2NH%2Bd%2F7DCSZTHfVqodWmhEMfuf3vvf85sFZc8qkM39waKuI4VI4cz%2BajZy62f7EitfUmTueENs6WJP78Cbc0mTyKnq9IK%2FM2zeLeMN%2BepE7I8eUbZ0JwisQL41p9Dwdp%2BM804JtdODCC9cGzOduLut0XLZZOubpWKXjiefH6difwBv8JrOgKMLYxx4jCQ4nJMaJfcumJGAzSuJiOk3HR2%2FpOAq9bRB56TjLksT34oBEAfFBnGbRLJ%2FkjEDAUdj7mExwbmpsVFs3rVhLw%2FCSKMWMwX4YxXE8xYM9975Z2rRkw3NBagZpXXxzjW5KrtFbqQQX9lir3CJXVto%2BMm4AQRD1Pc8bOQ232AV3fPtD9px7oVdag7vG2rIaI6dVB7g6tHhDKNZGMVKDeXcArwesZpQTeDTbp4j5kFYwTYJgFoWTPsnFxc3bxY1N8vbyDpJcvOyTXPRJzhbe35Vz66BNnP3IBrxYE8WJMIumlIJ9NGFKF%2B%2BTn%2FUPFxe7788SfqL%2FCdPvAvhgaoZkFTMfze3CVzR8fr%2F272dvPpzbYOATJtdHcMxOmbo5yycGhp8yyqKfs7Zc327WLDll1CkdcnioieAF02YuALa9Peubu5klQRS4jC5ZkWtXMJOOpaAM5Gk6%2Foq0pnwGiX5GeNE8W3ue%2F5muYAo8e%2BgeV4oVfLt%2FyACT1b7%2F9oJX7IqYcj9A8m%2FR8BfxLHLrJnxi%2FpRSEdb7Y5GGquB16ZIVqQkvaZ%2FV%2B3TcW5jPYXaweUEqzfZurms7gg7GXDB2sgwF%2BBuW%2BV9Y1oaprpZHw3tb1Q0v%2BHlVbVGPVd02P65eToPbRRiuTlXtlP7ETCo3opKE%2Fn%2BchCqEnq3C026T5uOtxi5%2Frds78stip37%2FcKtZ7U%2FYZ%2BD%2B2GTB8iyPyVkx5K%2FB7d3di1VVvWlPmQTLT1OKyaEUELZuM50rnjF6IYVhoqvGmrONHSFOR8hHQsrp2TlyuI48gLdQRORwIbKzg2%2B3gMLZlzCBXrdmh6%2Bd56ZRTMO1KdqqGvVLiOHGunVu3UsXyTVTm5JVtozVDuXdYBEadbl9rtF3TLWaVKxGlOVc273lMZ79%2FrHZbM6x7PzodNwKfO4AHxz0y4HG9wf7%2BGA%2FHdsbv2qh1s4%2F0bfxtf0VOQuTyCchLvLJDIfTaYCzfMJwEcwIZZkf%2B7PMGUChbAUaNyXrM0eEgkOYF%2F2uhjTZacQN2vCqQnwppGIIxi9SrGY11AwRdCu4YRRddgoa2a0HGXlAFJQ1SOdyCWLWoiweYUs0eq0VYRUgnpOGG1K56LUAq3AX4IwLCtmDupZVa7VHyJ8kSAyuKBOyFTk4NxD%2FAYcRWKoqqwdxp44lQBfyWnLqpg76rtUGwYLFIMRWGMVZHzS1UVviSGU6g7futYs2JQx1FEyRhE9KI5LBngnK1EVvyb1UaGgACNIqavcAbKNkLUtGD4Q7Mqwz%2BwF6AW3hSpNXFdk5c%2BhuKEG%2BsnsgNA3X3wrbNPTQNUTBrluxr%2BEOlMou0e%2BcwKMkp1mOI5IQ7PtsgmfUn2C4GJOCJcTzMs%2F57YnqZbd7vnMGFqMvSk4BVpTtAEH25SP5blMPszwvMi%2FCLGYUh9EsxjM%2FKvAsimI%2F8aIwCiyzBpWrNnveDSzHzhUMsUymyA%2FnYQw%2FJ7GboS%2BXLQjXpCJQrr6wJ%2BrV0A4dlYB1ROsd4sCsjjm2asdmeGS0H4N5P3gWw1c4pzAq8sMxZXoFO7hjB8lztraRwntDlgcBC8oC%2BG0ta3i%2B4nZOvXMaWQGdc20Bst%2BvWd7%2Fb3M66Q8GO0DhBijLIYsNyw6bf48piVhGwgjH04R%2BrG6DQl%2Buxz5azdTgg4huCGSra%2FBrTQdBADyqeM1h8oZHaK5lq%2FIOnAxGFWmGSAfbAxM6pGq5VKQpef4922mb9r3MXkBhTD9u4K8LKNlSqp1FUFDorO4VZmHTwmZxpWTBc85EfvhKxO6av7d1WDLoB2ULtmQvlWybTsI25M6CahipeFtb8jfWSvUoNhstSDNhCwan1PZO13S3%2F%2FuAttz4Sy%2F2LR0f%2BYyPfMbcYMtnbPkMf2g88BlzgXs%2BYyNPvo8uz4sz%2F69dcP2KKXm8VbuV4ErqbmIP7LLjHoDe%2FwE%3D

Guatemala and Israel have long had close ties, especially in security matters and Israeli arms sales to Guatemala.

No other country has their embassy for Israel in Jerusalem, though the Czech Republic has said it is considering such a move.

Trump upended decades of U.S. policy with his Dec. 6 announcement that he was recognizing Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. Though Trump said he was merely recognizing reality and not prejudging negotiations on the future borders of the city, Palestinians saw the move as siding with Israel on the most sensitive issue in the Israel-Palestinian conflict.

“I have determined that it is time to officially recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel,” Mr. Trump said in his announcement.

For more than two decades, Mr. Trump said that previous presidents had signed a waiver to delay moving the U.S. embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, but said that “we are no closer to a lasting peace agreement between Israel and the Palestinians.”

“While previous presidents have made this a major campaign promise, they failed to deliver,” he said. “Today, I am delivering.”

Mr. Trump said that he also directed the State Department to begin the process of moving the U.S. embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, but he will sign a waiver that will delay the move in order to avoid significant funding cuts. Officials said that it was not possible to move the embassy to Jerusalem immediately, however, and it could take “a matter of some years.”

Israel claims all of Jerusalem as its capital, while the Palestinians claim the city’s eastern sector, which was captured by Israel in 1967 and is home to sensitive religious Jewish, Muslim and Christian sites. Many governments have long said that the fate of Jerusalem must be resolved through negotiations.

Trump’s announcement has set off weeks of clashes between Palestinian protesters and Israeli security forces that have left 12 Palestinians dead.

Netanyahu has predicted others would follow the U.S. lead. He has made great efforts to reach out to Latin America in recent years as part of a campaign to counter longstanding support for the Palestinians at the United Nations.

In remarks at his weekly meeting of the Likud party faction in the Knessert, Netanyahu thanked Guatemala’s president.

“God bless you, my friend, President Jimmy Morales, God bless both our countries, Israel and Guatemala,” Netanyahu said.

The resolution passed by the General Assembly declared the U.S. action on Jerusalem “null and void.” The 128-9 vote was a victory for Palestinians, but fell short of the total they had predicted. Thirty-five nations abstained and 21 stayed away from the vote.

Palestinians’ foreign ministry blasted Guatemala’s move, calling the action “shameful,” according to Agence France-Presse.

“It’s a shameful and illegal act that goes totally against the wishes of church leaders in Jerusalem,” the ministry said in a statement.

Jordan’s minister of foreign affairs also said on Twitter that his country rejects the move.

We reject  decision to move embassy to & condemn it as absurd provocation, violation of international law. Occupied Jerusalem is capital of  state which must be established on June 4 1967 lines on basis of 2-state solution as only path to peace

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U.N. General Assembly Votes Against Trump-Israel On Jerusalem Issue

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE USA TODAY)

 

The United Nations General Assembly moved Thursday to repudiate President Trump’s controversial declaration recognizing Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. Trump threatened to withhold aid to countries that vote for the resolution.

The measure, drafted by U.S. ally Egypt, urges nations to support U.N. resolutions dating to 1967 when Israel captured East Jerusalem from Jordan, that call for Jerusalem’s status to be decided through negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians.

Israel says a united Jerusalem will remain its capital, while Palestinians want it to cede East Jerusalem as the capital of a future, independent Palestinian state. Only a handful of countries recognize Jerusalem as the Israeli capital, while most others maintain embassies in Tel Aviv.

The resolution says “that any decisions and actions which purport to have altered, the character, status or demographic composition of the Holy City of Jerusalem have no legal effect, are null and void and must be rescinded in compliance with relevant resolutions of the Security Council.”

Trump warned Wednesday that the vote could impact “billions of dollars” in U.S. aid.

“Let them vote against us, we’ll save a lot,” Trump said. “We don’t care. This isn’t like it used to be where they could vote against you and then you pay them hundreds of millions of dollars and nobody knows what they’re doing.”

Americans are “tired of being taken advantage of” at the U.N. “and we’re not going to be taken advantage of any longer,” Trump said.

Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan criticized Trump for threatening to cut off U.S. funding to countries that oppose his decision. “Mr Trump, you cannot buy Turkey’s democratic will with your dollars. Our decision is clear,” Erdogan said at a cultural awards ceremony in Ankara on Thursday.

U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley threatened the 193 U.N. member states and the United Nations with funding cuts if the assembly approves the draft resolution rejecting the U.S. decision to recognize Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. She said Wednesday that “no vote in the United Nations will make any difference” on the U.S. decision to move its embassy to Jerusalem, which will go ahead because “it is the right thing to do.”

“We will remember it when we are called upon once again to make the world’s largest contribution to the United Nations,” Haley said. “And we will remember when so many countries come calling on us, as they so often do, to pay even more and to use our influence for their benefit.”

Haley also threatened Tuesday to “take names” of countries that vote in favor of the measure.

At the UN we’re always asked to do more & give more. So, when we make a decision, at the will of the American ppl, abt where to locate OUR embassy, we don’t expect those we’ve helped to target us. On Thurs there’ll be a vote criticizing our choice. The US will be taking names.

Trump’s Dec. 6 announcement also said the State Department had been ordered to begin the years-long process of moving the U.S. Embassy to Jerusalem from Tel Aviv. Trump said the decision, following a law passed by Congress in 1998, does not impact the borders of Jerusalem, but reflected the reality that Israel considers the city its capital.

His announcement was widely condemned in capitals around the world, and provoked deadly protests in the Middle East.

More: U.S. vetoes U.N. resolution on Jerusalem

More: Jerusalem Palestinians still seek Israeli citizenship despite Trump declaration

More: Trump’s Jerusalem plan signals to Palestinians — the less you give up, the more you lose

Thursday’s vote at an emergency meeting of the General Assembly comes after the U.S. vetoed the same measure in the Security Council on Monday.

The remaining 14 Security Council members voted in favor of the resolution, including key U.S. allies such as Italy, Japan, Britain, France and Ukraine.

While the five permanent members of the Security Council — the United States, France, Britain, Russia and China — had veto power in the first vote, there are no vetoes at the General Assembly.

The General Assembly vote expresses widespread disapproval, however, it has little or not practical impact.

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