Holidays you won’t believe actually exist

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

Holidays you won’t believe actually exist

There isn’t much that beats a long weekend during a public holiday, one that you can celebrate with your family and friends. Typically, these days mark a significant historical date or commemorate a watershed moment in a society’s past—and sometimes they don’t. Here are some publicly recognized holidays that you won’t believe actually exist.

Fifth of July

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Where it’s celebrated: United States

Independence Day is one of the most important holidays celebrated in America. It celebrates the virtue that is the core of the American ideology – freedom. The holiday marks the signing of the Declaration of Independence, a document that represents a turning point in United States and world history. It is also a celebration of summer, epitomized by backyard barbecues, company picnics and elaborate fireworks displays.

However, since the Fourth of July is federal holiday on a hard date, it sometimes falls on a weekend. If this is the case, federal employees, schools, and the post office take the following Monday off, and many businesses follow suit. This makes the Fifth of July the holiday. July 5 is also National Bikini Day in the United States, which makes a perfect day to head to the beach.

National Picnic Day

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Where it’s celebrated: Australia

The first Monday of August is Picnic Day in the Northern Territory of Australia. Schools are closed, the postal service is suspended, and businesses are expected to give employees the day off.

While it may seem strange to suspend all business activities for something as simple as a picnic, the tradition comes from Australia’s industrial heritage. Picnic Day was originally a company wide event for railroad employees, which soon expanded into a region-wide series of events culminated in the Harts Range Races in Central Australia. However, some groups in Australia celebrate the day to mark a different occasion. It is sometimes used to remember the day when Chinese indentured servants were released from their tasks related to building the North Australia Railway.

Up Helly Aa

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Where it’s celebrated: Scotland

Up Helly Aa is a celebration of many things: winter, fire, Vikings, and, perhaps most significantly, alcohol. The celebration is held on the last Tuesday in January in multiple locations across the Shetland Islands and typically consists of costumed revelers parading through the streets of the largest nearby town. The festival begins with participants drinking heavily and ends with the burning of a replica Viking ship.

While the tradition might seem steeped in history, it is not, as there is no record of Norse cultures holding a similar event at that time of year. By most accounts, the celebration began as a way to combat public drunkenness and disorder in the early 1800s. Despite all these odd facts, Up Helly Aa is a publicly-recognized holiday, and all government operated offices are closed.

Day of the Sea

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Where it’s celebrated: Bolivia

A holiday honoring a country’s maritime history wouldn’t be anything out of the ordinary – unless that country was landlocked, as Bolivia is. The Day of the Sea, held every March 23, is the day that Bolivia remembers the loss of their last stretch of oceanfront property, the Port of Caluma. To commemorate the event, participants hold a parade that is accompanied by recordings of ship horns and sea gulls.

Bermuda Day

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Where it’s celebrated: Bermuda

At first glance, Bermuda Day seems normal enough. What country doesn’t take time to celebrate their heritage and way of life? What makes Bermuda Day intriguing, however, is the specific details of island life highlighted during the event. Bermuda day, celebrated every May 24, is widely known as the first day it is socially acceptable to swim in the ocean and wear shorts to work. In that way, it is a little like casual Friday, except it lasts all summer.

July 4th-Welcome To Donald J Trump Day

July 4th-Welcome To Donald J Trump Day

 

About an hour ago I posted an article from the Chicago Tribune Newspaper written by Rex Huppke that I hope you have read. Today in Washington D.C. our elusterus President is going to throw a shindig to celebrate, himself. Of course this farce is being paid for with taxpayer funds, hopefully you are not surprised by being stuck with the bill or that this whole event will be about himself. Back on January 20th or 2017 when he was sworn into Office he stiffed the city of D.C. with the 52 million dollar overrun which he still has not paid. This so called military parade will do things like tear up the roads and bridges but thats okay, we get the honor of paying for it. Donald Trump has made a lifetime out of not paying his bills, why should this be any different? Even the current and former leaders of our military are against this ego trip but Mr. Trump is in love with, well, himself mostly, but he has stressed several times how he likes the military parades that only Dictators Like Mr. Putin and Kim Jong Un throw and the people should also only show up if they are smiling and waving, at himself, like they do in Russia and North Korea. If I am wrong about this parade being about ‘the Donald’ I will publicly apologize to you tomorrow. In the meantime, happy fourth of July folks, I hope that you and your loved ones are able to have a happy and safe Fourth of July holiday, or should I say “Donald dimwit day’?

Holidays You may not believe actually exist

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

Holidays you won’t believe actually exist

There isn’t much that beats a long weekend during a public holiday, one that you can celebrate with your family and friends. Typically, these days mark a significant historical date or commemorate a watershed moment in a society’s past—and sometimes they don’t. Here are some publicly recognized holidays that you won’t believe actually exist.

Fifth of July

Credit: gilaxia / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: United States

Independence Day is one of the most important holidays celebrated in America. It celebrates the virtue that is the core of the American ideology – freedom. The holiday marks the signing of the Declaration of Independence, a document that represents a turning point in United States and world history. It is also a celebration of summer, epitomized by backyard barbecues, company picnics and elaborate fireworks displays.

However, since the Fourth of July is federal holiday on a hard date, it sometimes falls on a weekend. If this is the case, federal employees, schools, and the post office take the following Monday off, and many businesses follow suit. This makes the Fifth of July the holiday. July 5 is also National Bikini Day in the United States, which makes a perfect day to head to the beach.

National Picnic Day

Credit: JaySi / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Australia

The first Monday of August is Picnic Day in the Northern Territory of Australia. Schools are closed, the postal service is suspended, and businesses are expected to give employees the day off.

While it may seem strange to suspend all business activities for something as simple as a picnic, the tradition comes from Australia’s industrial heritage. Picnic Day was originally a company wide event for railroad employees, which soon expanded into a region-wide series of events culminated in the Harts Range Races in Central Australia. However, some groups in Australia celebrate the day to mark a different occasion. It is sometimes used to remember the day when Chinese indentured servants were released from their tasks related to building the North Australia Railway.

Up Helly Aa

Credit: HelenL100 / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Scotland

Up Helly Aa is a celebration of many things: winter, fire, Vikings, and, perhaps most significantly, alcohol. The celebration is held on the last Tuesday in January in multiple locations across the Shetland Islands and typically consists of costumed revelers parading through the streets of the largest nearby town. The festival begins with participants drinking heavily and ends with the burning of a replica Viking ship.

While the tradition might seem steeped in history, it is not, as there is no record of Norse cultures holding a similar event at that time of year. By most accounts, the celebration began as a way to combat public drunkenness and disorder in the early 1800s. Despite all these odd facts, Up Helly Aa is a publicly-recognized holiday, and all government operated offices are closed.

Day of the Sea

Credit: StreetFlash / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Bolivia

A holiday honoring a country’s maritime history wouldn’t be anything out of the ordinary – unless that country was landlocked, as Bolivia is. The Day of the Sea, held every March 23, is the day that Bolivia remembers the loss of their last stretch of oceanfront property, the Port of Caluma. To commemorate the event, participants hold a parade that is accompanied by recordings of ship horns and sea gulls.

Bermuda Day

Credit: wwing / iStock

Where it’s celebrated: Bermuda

At first glance, Bermuda Day seems normal enough. What country doesn’t take time to celebrate their heritage and way of life? What makes Bermuda Day intriguing, however, is the specific details of island life highlighted during the event. Bermuda day, celebrated every May 24, is widely known as the first day it is socially acceptable to swim in the ocean and wear shorts to work. In that way, it is a little like casual Friday, except it lasts all summer.

A brief history of Father’s Day

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

A brief history of Father’s Day

Every June the United States collectively goes out shopping for ties, power tools, and other gifts to give to their dad on Father’s Day, the third Sunday of June each year. This simple tradition was not always the norm in America, and Father’s Day just celebrated its 100th birthday a few years ago.

Learn more about Father’s Day and how it came to be an American tradition with this brief history.

A sequel to Mother’s Day

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The establishment of Father’s Day was directly related to the growth of Mother’s Day as an annual tradition. Mother’s Day was first observed during the Civil War era, when Ann Reeves Jarvis celebrated “Mother’s Work Day” in the 1860s. That annual celebration was held intermittently for decades before Ann Reeves Jarvis’ daughter, Anna Jarvis, established it as a national holiday with the help of the advertising wing of the John Wanamaker’s department store in Philadelphia.

Mother’s Day caught on quickly. The first Mother’s Day was held in 1908, was observed by 45 states in 1909, and was officially named a national holiday by President Woodrow Wilson in 1914.

The first Father’s Day?

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The official first Father’s Day is a point of minor contention. On June 5, 1908, a church in West Virginia held a service honoring fathers after a coal mining collapse killed 362 men in the community and left over 1,000 children fatherless. This is the first-known instance of an official honoring of fathers, but this single event did not start the modern practice of Father’s Day.

The mother of Father’s Day, so to speak, was Sonora Smart Dodd, a resident of Spokane, Washington. Sonora Smart Dodd’s mother had died during childbirth, which left her father to raise six children as a single parent. She wanted to honor both him and fathers across the country by hosting Father’s Day on her father’s birthday, which was, coincidentally, June 5, the same day the West Virginia church had held their Father’s Day service the year prior. Dodd suggested this to the ministry of the Spokane church, but they requested more time to prepare a sermon for the event. June 19, 1909, was chosen as the new date for the first Father’s Day, and in the following year, Washington State held the first statewide Father’s Day celebration.

Spread and pushback

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The event spread throughout the United States at a much slower pace than Mother’s Day had over the same period of years. The first presidential acknowledgement of Father’s Day came in 1916, two years after Mother’s Day had been adopted as a federal holiday, when President Woodrow Wilson pushed a button that sent a telegraphic signal that unfurled an American flag in Spokane on Father’s Day.

President Calvin Coolidge was also a supporter of the holiday and suggested it be adopted by the U.S. in 1924. But the public was less enthusiastic about celebrating Father’s Day than they had been about Mother’s Day, and both were nearly eliminated and combined into one holiday that grew in popularity during the 1920s and 1930s, Parent’s Day.

It was the push to commercialize the holiday that garnered the most distrust from the general population. Department stores had stated a goal of creating a “second Christmas” fueled by gift giving around Father’s Day, which many of the public found distasteful. However, the financial hardship during the Great Depression of the 1930s helped advance the cause of Father’s Day, as the struggling retailers intensified their ad campaign selling the event and gifts with it.

The Second World War was another boon to Father’s Day, as buying gifts for Father’s Day became a way to support the troops who were fighting overseas. By the time World War II had ended, Father’s Day was an institution in the country, even if it was not a federal holiday.

Road to a Federal Holiday

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Father’s Day faced a few more hurdles before it became recognized as a federal holiday. It was recognized by Congress for the first time in 1956. Ten years later, in 1966, President Lyndon Johnson issued a proclamation in favor of having Father’s Day be celebrated as a federal holiday. But it wasn’t until 1972 when President Richard Nixon made it official.

The holiday became an official holiday just a few short years before Sonora Smart Dodd would die in 1978 at age of 96.