(Salute/Poem) A Rainy Day In The Bluegrass

A Rainy Day In The Bluegrass

 

(This poem is dedicated to my Father-in-Law Glenn Wright who

is very, very close to saying goodbye to us this evening. Dad is at

the stage where if you are merciful, please pray for Dad to let go,

to go to sleep. He told me his wishes several times, to let Him go.)

 

 

I was graced to be born in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia

One of Yahweh’s beautiful landscapes for the human eye to see

Lived many a year on the land where Mr. Crockett called home

All are lands where the Fiddle and the Banjo still sing their songs

Too lay down in the ground where Mr. Boone once had a Fort

Blessed to have been born in one of God’s beautiful Mountain Resort

We all must face that rainy day, as for me I wish to be lain, under Bluegrass

 

(Writing this piece this evening as I was working on the sections I realized even more things that we two had in common. Either way, I salute you Sir, you are a very good Father-in-Law, thank you for giving me such a wonderful Lady and Son.)

Hate And Fear For Villagers Living Near The ‘Line Of Control” (LOC)

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE HINDUSTAN TIMES)

 

An unending ordeal for Kashmiri villagers on ‘live’ Indo-Pak border

Villagers barely two to three kilometers away from the zero line and in the direct line of fire have witnessed maximum number of skirmishes and casualties.

INDIA Updated: Oct 05, 2017 08:10 IST

Ravi Krishnan Khajuria
Ravi Krishnan Khajuria
Hindustan Times, Allah/Arnia
Villagers say the tender minds of children, getting exposed to bloodshed and deaths at a young age, are left with a permanent scar.
Villagers say the tender minds of children, getting exposed to bloodshed and deaths at a young age, are left with a permanent scar.(Nitin Kanotra/HT File Photo)

More than 45,000 people across 42 villages and the most-populated border town of Arnia on Indo-Pak border in Jammu and Kashmir see themselves as sitting ducks for Pakistani artillery.

Some of the villages in Arnia sub-sector of Jammu district that witnessed skirmishes from September 13 to September 23 are barely two to three kilometres away from the zero line and are in the line of direct fire.

Guns on either side of 198-km long Indo-Pak international border fall silent intermittently, but villagers are sceptical of the fragile peace and live in a constant fear.

The two nuclear neighbours had agreed to a ceasefire in November 2003 but that now lies in tatters, as different parts of the line of control and the International Border whistle to the sound of mortar shelling. The arc has widened but Arnia remains in the constant gaze of Pakistan.

Artillery horror

Chuni Lal, 63, a marginal farmer in Allah village, who lost his wife Ratno Devi, 50, on the intervening night of September 16 and 17 to a Pakistani mortar, recounts the spine-chilling horror.

“Pakistan was raining mortars that night. All of us… my wife, two married sons, their wives and my six grand-children had huddled inside a room. Electricity had snapped after a mortar hit transmission lines. Around 2 am I shifted to an adjoining lobby as it was hot and sultry inside the room. Around 2.30 am my wife and daughter-in-law (Rajni Devi) came to lobby and had just opened the door when a mortar exploded with a deafening sound in our verandah. My wife’s left ankle was blown away and she suffered serious injuries in her abdomen too. Rajni was also bleeding profusely.”

Read more

Lal sought a neighbour’s help, who drove his car for nearly two hours to shift Lal, Ratno Devi and Rajni Devi to a hospital in Jammu city where Ratno died.

Besides Ratno Devi, a BSF jawan Brijendra Bahadur was killed and over a dozen villagers were injured in Arnia in Pakistani firing that began on September 13.

Lal’s two sons Om Prakash, 46, and Subhash Chander, 40, work as labourers and do petty jobs to support the family.

Traumatised children

Subhash’s wife Rajni Devi, who had suffered serious injuries, along with her two daughters Mamta, 15, Janvi, 13, and son Nitish, 9, have been living in a relative’s house in a safe village, away from Pakistan’s firing range and away from their school as well.

Pakistan had rained 82 mm and 120 mm mortars — battalion level low trajectory weapons — on hapless villagers.

“The children are traumatised from what they saw that night. They don’t want to return home and we also are apprehensive of this fragile peace. Death stalks us all the time but we don’t have any option” says Subhash.

Grim future

Forget children’s education, the people in the border belt of Arnia are deprived of a normal life, says Subhash.

In Arnia sub-sector, the state government has shut 33 government schools with a total enrolment of around 1500 students within five km radius of the border.

Read more

Fifty-year-old Gopal Dass, a small farmer in Allah village says, “Education is important, rather indispensable in present times but how could our children pursue it in such a hostile and uncertain atmosphere?”

Dass divulges another aspect of the shelling. “At very young age these children get exposed to loud explosions, bloodshed and deaths. It leaves a permanent scar on their tender minds but then who cares for the children of a lesser God?”

HT came across a group of small children aged between 5 to 12 years at Pindi Charakan village.

When asked why they weren’t in their schools, six-year-old Tannu replied, “Pakistan bomb chalata hai na. School band hain. Humko chupna padta hai. (“Pakistan bombs us. Schools are closed. We have to go into hiding during shelling).”

Farming hit hard

Another farmer Rattan Lal, 63, says, “While a family (of Chuni Lal) has been ruined, unexploded shells are still lying in the agricultural fields. The farmers are still not going to their fields because you never know when Pakistan starts firing at us. They cannot be trusted. Initially, heavy shelling destroyed our paddy crop, especially in the fields beyond barbed fence (towards Pakistani territory), and now out of fear, we are not able to irrigate whatever is left.”

Lal, like several other villagers, feels that they are caught in a Catch-22 situation. Farming, by and large, is the major source of livelihood in the border areas.

Thoru Ram, 56, informs that though there has been no firing since September 23, the BSF as a precautionary measure, was not allowing farmers to go to their fields beyond the barbed fence.

“Farmers on other side (in Pakistan) are also not coming to their fields,” he says.

7,000 people, one bunker

Allah village with a population of 7,000 has only one bunker where an optimum of 30 people can take refuge during shelling.

The villagers dubbed it a cruel joke as water seeps in and fills almost half the bunker during monsoons. “It turns into a pool of water and is of no use. The government has spent Rs 5 lakh on it but it would have been far better and practical had the government constructed individual bunkers in the houses of the villagers,” says Thoru Ram, 56.

“When mortars are being rained, how could one think of reaching one corner of the village to get into the bunker? I think government of the day should apply some mind,” he mocks.

In Rajouri district, hundred bunkers are being constructed while the state government has submitted a proposal to the Centre for constructing 621 community bunkers at a cost of Rs 6 lakh each and 8,197 individual bunkers at a cost of Rs 2.40 lakh each.

Pakistan’s arc of fire

Since May 1, when Pakistani Border Action Teams killed and beheaded two Indian soldiers — JCO Paramjit Singh and BSF head constable Prem Sagar — in Krishna Ghati (KG) sector of Poonch district, there has been no let up in Pakistani firing and shelling in Rajouri and Poonch border districts.

In Nowshera sector of Rajouri, incessant Pakistani shelling triggered migration of over 4,000 villagers to six relief camps in Nowshera town in May.

Pakistan also opened other fronts along the international border in Jammu, Samba and Kathua districts from August onwards.

“It has been a pattern of the enemy (Pakistan). During summers when there is no snow on the mountains and passes, Pakistan tries to push terrorists via LoC in Poonch and Rajouri districts and in winters their focus shifts to international border in Jammu region, usually Hiranagar, RS Pura, Arnia and Ramgarh. In the process they adopt all ploys of opening unprovoked fire on our posts and then flaring up the situation by targeting villages,” says a senior Army officer.

A police officer said that Arnia, the largest border town of the state just three km from the border is a soft target for Pakistan. The town has a population of nearly 20,000.

“They (Pakistan Rangers) are known for targeting hapless villagers and they know it is thickly populated,” the officer adds.

However, defence officials say there are other reasons, which can’t be shared in public domain.

Read TIME’s Original Report on the Sputnik 1 Launch 60 Yrs Ago Today

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME.COM SCIENCE)

 

Read TIME’s Original Report on the Sputnik 1 Launch

Oct 03, 2017

The Soviets called it sputnik, meaning simply “satellite” or “fellow traveler.” But to American space-watchers of 60 years ago, the satellite that launched on Oct. 4, 1957 had many meanings: defeat and discovery, but also the promise of the space race that was to come.

The launch — the anniversary of which coincides with the beginning of World Space Week — came as a surprise to scientists and officials in the U.S., though they quickly downplayed their shock that the USSR had the ability to get a heavy satellite into orbit, a feat the U.S. had not yet accomplished. The following week’s issue of TIME explained how the news broke:

Hurtling unseen, hundreds of miles from the earth, a polished metal sphere the size of a beach ball passed over the world’s continents and oceans one day last week. As it circled the globe for the first time, traveling at 18.000 m.p.h., the U.S. was blissfully unaware that a new era in history had begun, opening a bright new chapter in mankind’s conquest of the natural environment and a grim new chapter in the cold war.

The news came in a broadcast by Moscow radio, and it got to Washington in an ironic way. At the Soviet embassy on 16th Street that evening, some 50 scientists of 13 nations, members of the International Geophysical Year rocket and satellite conference, were gathered at a cocktail party. After the vodka, Scotch and bourbon started to flow, New York Times Reporter Walter Sullivan got an urgent phone call from his paper, hurried back to whisper in the ear of a U.S. scientist. A moment later Physicist Lloyd Berkner rapped on the hors d’oeuvre table until the hubbub quieted. “I wish to make an announcement,” he said. “I am informed by the New York Times that a satellite is in orbit at an elevation of 900 kilometers [559 miles]. I wish to congratulate our Soviet colleagues on their achievement.”

As the science section added, that achievement was quite remarkable: sputnik was heavier than expected — more than eight times heavier than the satellite the comparable U.S. project had been looking at — which meant that Soviet rocket capabilities were impressive. The satellite also flew higher than the American scientists had thought possible.

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Scientists turned on their gear to track sputnik as radio stations and amateur astronomers alike sought the telltale sound it emitted — a sound TIME called “those chilling beeps,” acknowledging that the remarkable scientific achievement was also hard proof of Communist success in a Cold War world in which scientific advancement was seen as a proxy for military might.

However, as TIME noted, at least some people saw sputnik as a good sign for the U.S., realizing that it was just the kick the nation needed to commit seriously to space exploration. The reason for the Soviet success was not superior thinking, they felt, but rather that the U.S. had not yet decided to commit to the cause. As the space race got into gear, those people could hardly have known just how right they were.

So, Apes Gave Early Humans Herpes?

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

Herpes has been around a long time, to say the least.

Ancient chimpanzees genetically passed oral herpes (herpes simplex 1, or HSV-1) to the earliest humans millions of years ago when our lineage split. And we almost missed out on catching that other scourge, genital herpes (HSV-2) — almost. Unlike HSV-1, HSV-2 didn’t make the leap to early humans on its own.
Unfortunately for modern humans, millions of years ago, an early human ancestor was in the right place at the right time to catch HSV-2. And it might not have happened if it weren’t for that meddling hominin species Paranthropus boisei, according to a new study in the journal Virus Evolution.
Standing at about 4 feet tall, boisei had a small brain and a wide, dish-like face. It is most well-known for having big teeth and hefty chewing muscles. One skull was nicknamed “Nutcracker Man” for these traits.
Boisei acted as the in-between agent for genital herpes to make the species jump from primates to humans, researchers say.
Ancient chimpanzees, boisei and Homo erectus were all in Africa between 1.4 million and 3 million years ago, in an area where the evolution of modern humans would occur. It would be easy for them to come into contact with each other around water sources.
HSV-2 itself was evolving at the time, and it could be spread orally.
The researchers believe that the circle of life caused this transmission, which would have to happen through fluid exchange. Chimpanzee bites or scratches would transfer the virus through sores.
So what about the human bloodline? According to the researchers, transfer could have happened through sexual intercourse or Homo erectus consuming boisei — or both.
“We can ‘blame’ our ancestors for eating other hominins/great apes, this has been the source of other primate-to-human infections such as HIV,” Charlotte Houldcroft, senior study author and virologist at the University of Cambridge Department of Archaeology, wrote in an email. “Eating other species closely related to oneself has risks, because pathogens adapted to species genetically similar to us will find it easier to jump the species barrier.”
The most genetically diverse strains of HSV-2 come from Africa, and the amount of worldwide HSV-2 genetic diversity points to an out-of-Africa migration, according to the researchers.
“Essentially, when humans migrated out of Africa, they already carried HSV-2, and wherever humans went, their viruses went too,” Houldcroft said. “HSV-2 infects for life and can be passed from mother to baby or between sexual partners, which made sure it successfully spread wherever humans did.”
But making this determination when there are gaps in the fossil record required more than just an analysis of old bones.
“It’s a really interesting question that is invisible to archaeology,” Houldcroft said. “Why wouldn’t you want to try and solve the mystery?!”
The study brought together a virologist, an engineer and a researcher of human evolution to apply and develop a model to meld their areas of expertise.
They used Bayesian network modeling — a graphical model using probability, random variables and conditional dependencies — to combine data of ancient climates, herpes DNA and fossils and determine the probability of HSV-2 and how it might be transmitted.
“We can use data from diseases to reconstruct events that are completely invisible to the archaeological and fossil records,” Houldcroft said. “The signals in the HSV-2 virus are records of direct contact between the ancestors of us and chimps that we can tangibly now ‘see’ and gives us direct insight into the daily lives of our ancestors.”
The researchers said the biggest surprise was not the findings themselves but rather the discovery that their diverse backgrounds informed a different way to look at a problem and solve it creatively.
“Their combined use of bayesian models and AI to fit climate and environmental data with hominin fossils is insightful,” Angelique Corthals, forensic anthropologist and assistant professor at the City University of New York, wrote in an email. “It allows the research to redefine the jump of HSV-2 from from chimpanzees to humans.”
“The methods of this paper have strikingly important implications for the study of pathogen transmission and the appearance of potential epidemics, as it is able to predict, given a specific set of environmental and demographic/population-based data, a jump from wildlife disease to human,” she wrote. “Better yet, it is able to predict potential intermediate hosts, within the context of the evolutionary history of both the hosts and the pathogens.”
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Corthals, who was not involved with the new research, said caution should be taken to ensure that the probability isn’t overcomplicated because of the huge data set and amount of possible variables.
“Should the methods stand further scrutiny and data-modeling, (this) will have serious implications in how we model and prevent pandemics,” Corthals said.
The research builds on a study from 2014 on the origin of human herpes viruses.
“We found that HSV-2 likely jumped from the ancestor of chimpanzees into a human ancestor, but we left it at that,” wrote Joel Wertheim, assistant professor at the University of California, San Diego Department of Medicine and lead author of the 2014 study, in an email. “This study continues our research through an unexpected avenue, looking at the prehistorical forest geography. This is not a line of inquiry I would have anticipated, but it provides a textured layer to the story of HSV origins.”
The researchers are now working with colleagues in South Africa and the United States to learn how other ancient conditions, like human pubic lice, transmitted to modern humans.
“The usual obstacles of not enough fossils and archaeological preservation are always present, but also contribute to making the subject such a compelling one,” Houldcroft said.

(History/Poem): Spearfish South Dakota

Spearfish South Dakota

 

What an odd name, ye may think of me

But for a lack of luck ye all would know me

Maybe my name would be steeped in lore

In our Country’s Great Plains fabled history

 

Black Hills Dakota, land of the Great Sioux Nation, gold, and blood

Deadwood you know, Bill Hickok dying in blood with his famous hand

Crazy Horse, an outcast child because he cried when bees spilt his blood

Custer and the Seventh etched in history, paying for their genocidal sins

 

I’m in the center of timber and gold

All around me is glory and fame

The great mighty Sioux Nation

And the tears that they paid

 

Now only grade school books tell my story

Come visit the Little Big Horn Custer’s Last Stand

Rapid City now a main gate to the great northwest

Four faces carved in stone, a true monument

 

I stand true to the blood of those who bore me

 Shrouded in the famous Black Hills history

Sturgis’s freedom now rumbles right next to me

Spearfish South Dakota, Paradise of God, then and now

Sixth Mass Extinction is All But Guaranteed Math Says

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF ‘GEEK.COM’)

 

Sixth Mass Extinction is All But Guaranteed Math Says

BY  09.22.2017 :: 11:00AM EDT 

Fossilized Poo Reveals that Vegetarian Dinosaurs had a Taste for Crabs

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF SCIENTIFIC AMERICA)

 

Fossilized Poo Reveals that Vegetarian Dinosaurs had a Taste for Crabs

Ancient crustaceans in dino dung from Utah illuminate herbivores’ broad diet

Kaiaparowits Plateau. Credit: Education Images Getty Images

Plant-eating dinosaurs usually found plenty to eat, but occasionally they went looking for a nutritional boost. Fossilized dinosaur droppings from Utah now reveal that 75 million years ago, some of the animals were snacking on prehistoric crayfish or crabs.

The work suggests that big herbivorous dinosaurs sometimes munched on crustaceans, likely to get extra protein and calcium into their bodies before laying eggs, says Karen Chin, a palaeontologist at the University of Colorado Boulder. She and her colleagues report the discovery on September 21 in Scientific Reports1.

“It’s a very unusual case of an herbivorous dinosaur supplementing its diet with something else,” says Paul Barrett, a palaeontologist at the Natural History Museum in London.

Direct evidence of dinosaur diets is hard to come by. Some fossil animals have been found with their gut contents intact, but fossilized dinosaur dung — the most convincing remains of what a dinosaur actually ate — is rare. “Think of a cow pat — these things get broken down in the environment very easily,” says Barrett. Most of the fossilized faeces, called coprolites, that researchers uncover come from meat-eating dinosaurs; these are better preserved than those of plant-eating dinosaurs thanks to minerals in the bones of the creatures that carnivores consumed.

Chin has long hunted for coprolites from herbivorous dinosaurs. In 2007, she reported2 finding fossilized chunks of rotting wood inside coprolites, between about 80 million and 74 million years old, from the Two Medicine rock formation in Montana. Plant-eating dinosaurs may have chewed the wood in search of insects and other organisms scurrying inside rotting logs, she proposed.

Then, in 2013, she found many similar coprolites in the Kaiparowits Formation of Grand Staircase–Escalante National Monument in southern Utah. Along with rotting wood, they contained puzzling fragments of thin, convex structures. When Chin examined slices of the structures under a microscope, they looked very much like the outer covering of a crustacean’s leg or claw. She consulted Rodney Feldmann, a palaeontologist at Kent State University in Ohio, who confirmed that they probably came from a crayfish or crab.

DIETARY SUPPLEMENT

At the time the Kaiparowits rocks formed, around 75 million years ago, the landscape was a wet, subtropical environment much like today’s Texas coast. Chin thinks that local dinosaurs — probably the duck-billed group called hadrosaurs — went in search of dietary supplements near the shoreline. “You get so many invertebrates hanging out in rotting logs,” she says. “There’s bugs to eat, and rotting detritus — it’s a really rich place.” The fungi that helped to break down the logs would also have provided extra protein.

Some modern birds with mostly plant-based diets add insects and other sources of protein before they lay eggs, she notes. “You can’t imagine a 20-foot hadrosaur going after a butterfly,” Chin says. “They would go for some place that had a predictable, concentrated source of food — some place like rotting logs.”

The rotting wood probably wasn’t a main source of dinosaur food year-round, says Jordan Mallon, a palaeontologist at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa. “Hadrosaurs were some of the biggest animals in their ecosystems, so they probably couldn’t have afforded to be too selective about what they were eating anyway, lest they starve to death.”

Mallon thinks the dinosaurs might have accidentally snaffled up a crayfish or two while feeding, as opposed to seeking the crustaceans out on purpose. Either way, he says, the latest findings “provide an excellent glimpse in the lives of these animals, 75 million years ago”.

This article is reproduced with permission and was first published on September 21, 2017.

Newly unearthed ancient tomb with mummies unveiled in Egypt

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

Newly unearthed ancient tomb with mummies unveiled in Egypt

Researchers examine the tomb on Saturday.

Luxor, Egypt (CNN)Egyptian authorities unveiled a previously undiscovered ancient tomb belonging to a goldsmith and his wife near Luxor in southern Egypt on Saturday.

The tomb, at the Draa Abul Nagaa necropolis, contains “mummies, sarcophagi, statuettes, pots and other artifacts,” according to Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities.
It belonged to Amenemhat — which means the god “Amen Is In the Forefront” — and his wife Amenhotep, said Mostafa Al-Waziri, who led the Egyptian team which unearthed the 3,500-year-old tomb.
While Amenhotep is usually a man’s name, Waziri said, the team found references inside the tomb that indicated she was the lady of the house.
CNN was the first media outlet to be given access to the tomb on the day of the announcement.

Researchers discovered a number of skulls inside the tomb.

An entrance, uncovered in the courtyard of another tomb, leads to a squared chamber where, in a niche, Amenemhat is pictured with his wife in a partly damaged duo sandstone statue, Waziri said.
Between their legs is seen a little figure of their son. “The daughter, or as they used to refer (to daughters) ‘the precious,’ is usually the one pictured in this place. If the family have no daughters, they would take their daughter-in-law. It is unusual to see the son,” said Waziri.
The owners belong to the 18th dynasty of Egypt. The tomb appears to have been reused, as sarcophagi from the 22nd and 21st dynasties were found as well, said Minister of Antiquities Khaled el-Enany.

Statues discovered in the tomb, whose owners belong to the 18th dynasty.

It had two burial shafts, one of them probably dug for the mummies of Amenemhat and Amenhotep. Archaeologists found mummies, sarcophagi and funerary masks carved in wood, along with statuettes of the goldsmith and his wife.
Archaeologists also found the mummies of a woman and her two adult children in another burial shaft in the courtyard. Experts said initial analysis of the mummies shed light on the diseases from which the deceased were suffering, as well other aspects of how they lived.
The tomb also holds clues to new tombs, in the form of funerary masks belonging to four officials whose burial spots have not yet been found.
“This is not the end. This will lead to more discoveries in the future,” Waziri said.

Archaeologists also found funerary masks carved in wood and statuettes of the couple.

The clue that led to the tomb unveiled Saturday was in fact uncovered in another 3,500-year-old tomb unearthed in April in the same area, he said.
In that discovery, officials announced that they had found 10 colorful sarcophagi and numerous figurines.
The main T-shaped tomb in the April find belonged to a city judge named Userhat and is typical of New Kingdom noblemen’s tombs, the ministry said in a statement at the time.
Egyptian archeologists have also found several other tombs and statues in other areas of Egypt this year.
Parts of a 3,000-year-old colossal statue, believed to have stood about 30 feet tall, were found in Cairo in March. Archeologists unearthed the statue in a pit in an area of low-income housing in the eastern neighborhood of Matareya.
This story has been updated to clarify the translation of Amenemhat’s name made by Egyptian officials during Saturday’s news conference.

Researchers examine the tomb on Saturday.

Luxor, Egypt (CNN)Egyptian authorities unveiled a previously undiscovered ancient tomb belonging to a goldsmith and his wife near Luxor in southern Egypt on Saturday.

The tomb, at the Draa Abul Nagaa necropolis, contains “mummies, sarcophagi, statuettes, pots and other artifacts,” according to Egypt’s Ministry of Antiquities.
It belonged to Amenemhat — which means the god “Amen Is In the Forefront” — and his wife Amenhotep, said Mostafa Al-Waziri, who led the Egyptian team which unearthed the 3,500-year-old tomb.
While Amenhotep is usually a man’s name, Waziri said, the team found references inside the tomb that indicated she was the lady of the house.
CNN was the first media outlet to be given access to the tomb on the day of the announcement.

Researchers discovered a number of skulls inside the tomb.

An entrance, uncovered in the courtyard of another tomb, leads to a squared chamber where, in a niche, Amenemhat is pictured with his wife in a partly damaged duo sandstone statue, Waziri said.
Between their legs is seen a little figure of their son. “The daughter, or as they used to refer (to daughters) ‘the precious,’ is usually the one pictured in this place. If the family have no daughters, they would take their daughter-in-law. It is unusual to see the son,” said Waziri.
The owners belong to the 18th dynasty of Egypt. The tomb appears to have been reused, as sarcophagi from the 22nd and 21st dynasties were found as well, said Minister of Antiquities Khaled el-Enany.

Statues discovered in the tomb, whose owners belong to the 18th dynasty.

It had two burial shafts, one of them probably dug for the mummies of Amenemhat and Amenhotep. Archaeologists found mummies, sarcophagi and funerary masks carved in wood, along with statuettes of the goldsmith and his wife.
Archaeologists also found the mummies of a woman and her two adult children in another burial shaft in the courtyard. Experts said initial analysis of the mummies shed light on the diseases from which the deceased were suffering, as well other aspects of how they lived.
The tomb also holds clues to new tombs, in the form of funerary masks belonging to four officials whose burial spots have not yet been found.
“This is not the end. This will lead to more discoveries in the future,” Waziri said.

Archaeologists also found funerary masks carved in wood and statuettes of the couple.

The clue that led to the tomb unveiled Saturday was in fact uncovered in another 3,500-year-old tomb unearthed in April in the same area, he said.
In that discovery, officials announced that they had found 10 colorful sarcophagi and numerous figurines.
The main T-shaped tomb in the April find belonged to a city judge named Userhat and is typical of New Kingdom noblemen’s tombs, the ministry said in a statement at the time.
Egyptian archeologists have also found several other tombs and statues in other areas of Egypt this year.
Parts of a 3,000-year-old colossal statue, believed to have stood about 30 feet tall, were found in Cairo in March. Archeologists unearthed the statue in a pit in an area of low-income housing in the eastern neighborhood of Matareya.
This story has been updated to clarify the translation of Amenemhat’s name made by Egyptian officials during Saturday’s news conference.

“Russia Has Never Denied Israels Rights To Jerusalem, The Temple Mount Or The Western Wall”

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE JERUSALEM POST)    (THIS IS A RE-POST FROM 11-06-2016 HAS ANYTHING REALLY CHANGED)

Moscow has never denied Israel’s rights to Jerusalem, the Temple Mount or the Western Wall, Russian Prime Minister Dimitry Medvedev said in advance of his visit to the Jewish state later this week.

“These rights are clear and it would be absurd to deny them,” he told Channel 2 anchorwoman Yonit Levy.

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He spoke warmly of Russia’s ties with Israel, despite Moscow’s votes against the Jewish state at the United Nations and its delivery of the S-300 missiles to Iran.


Benjamin Netanyahu Dimitry Medvedev. (Photo credit: RIA NOVOSTI / REUTERS)

Levy quizzed him about those controversial issues as well as his support for Syrian President Basher Assad and charges that his country had intervened in the US elections.

How does Russia explain its support of the UNESCO vote “to disregard the historic connection between the Jewish people and the Temple Mount in Jerusalem,” Levy asked Medvedev.

The issue had been blown out of proportion, he responded speaking in Russian, with a Hebrew translation by Channel 2.

There have been some ten votes by UNESCO Boards and Committees on such Jerusalem resolutions, Medvedev said.

“There is nothing new here,” he said, as he dismissed the significance of UNESCO texts that refer to the Temple Mount solely by its Muslim name of Al Haram Al Sharif.

“Our country has never denied the rights of Israel or the Jewish people to Jerusalem, the Temple Mount or the Western Wall,” Medvedev said.

“Therefore there is no need to politicize this decision,” Medvedev said, adding that such resolutions, were “not directed against Israel.”

Similarly, he said, there was nothing contradictory in Russia’s sale and shipment of the advanced S-300 advanced surface to air missile defense system to Iran.

Israel had opposed such sales because they significantly upgrade Iran’s ability to defend its nuclear sites against any attacks. It is particularly concerned because it does not believe that the Iran deal, put in place in 2015, will limit Tehran’s capacity to develop nuclear weapons.

Medvedev told Channel 2 that prior to the Iran deal, Russia respected the sanctions against Tehran and refrained from delivering the S-300. Now that the deal is in place and the sanctions were lifted, there was no reason not to complete the sale, he said.

Moving over to Syria, he referred to President Bashar Assad as the country’s only legitimate leader and added that Israel’s leadership preferred his rule to the prospect of a divided country under terrorist leadership.

“I know him (Assad) personally. There are those who love him and those who don’t. At present Assad is the only legitimate authority operating in Syria. Any regime change would have to occur legitimately,” Medvedev said.

“I remember that during my meetings with Israeli leaders, they told me they were not completely for Assad, but that there has to be someone in charge of the situation, rather than an uncontrolled break up of the country into enclaves ruled by terrorists,” Medvedev said.

Middle East terrorism, he said, is threatening his country from within.

“There are thousands of Russians fighting on behalf of ISIS and other Islamic Jihadist groups,” Medvedev said. “When they return they are experienced murders and terrorists. After their time fighting in Syria we don’t want them to organize something similar [within Russia],” he said.

Levy asked how the presence of the Russian air force in Syria impacted Israel’s ability to prevent the flow of weapons to Hezbollah.

Medvedev said that it was operating from the assumption that “all sides would not take steps to aggravate the conflict.”

With regard to the United States, he charged that it had not kept its commitments in Syria and that the relationship between Washington and Moscow was at a very low point.

Medvedev chuckled when Levy asked him if Russia had interfered with the US elections.

He quoted Russian President Vladimir Putin, when he stated that “the United States is not a banana republic.”

The US, he said, was a large and strong country and could not be influenced in that way. “It doesn’t matter who will be elected, but what policy they will execute,” he said.

“Its clear [that either candidate] will act in the best national interest of the US,” Medvedev said.

He called Republican candidate Donald Trump brilliant and said he had never met him. Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton, he said, was professional and known to him from the times he met with her when she was US Secretary of State from 2009-2012.

Russia expects to have a “normal” and “productive” relationship with whichever of the two candidates wins the White House, Medvedev said.

With regard to the Russian initiative to hold a meeting with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Palestinian Authority Presdient Mahmoud Abbas, Medvedev said that Moscow was not looking to replace the United States or anyone else when it comes to the peace process.

On the other hand, he said, there are very discouraging signs with regard to that conflict and there have been no advancements to speak of on the Israeli-Palestinian track over the last few years.

“It’s very sad,” he said.

(History/Poem) Tangled And Twisted: The Belvidere Illinois F-4 Tornado

Tangled And Twisted

 

April 21st, 1967 a day that I remember well

In my mind, this day will always in infamy live

This day an F-4 tornado tore into our hometown

Killing and hurting so many the day darkness kissed

 

 

About four on Friday afternoon it showed its wrath

Down the business twenty corridor this killer swept

Hitting the Chrysler Assembly Plant about change of shift

Pacemaker grocery store and Highland Hospital it hit

 

 

Houses in the neighborhoods swept clean to cement

To the high school with children filled buses it went

Buses thrown like bowling pens, its wrath did vent

Many a white crosses are for so many of the children

Now lay in rest with white stones at their heads

The living hearts broken from the day of the twist

 

 

It’s not just cars and houses that are missed

It’s survivors lives such storms tangle and twist

Empty desks within the classrooms never filled

Forever a reminder of friends that we still miss

An F-4 tornado our lives it did tangle and twist

This blog, trouthtroubles.com is owned, written, and operated by oldpoet56. All articles, posts, and materials found here, except for those that I have pressed here from someone else’s blog for the purpose of showing off their work, are under copyright and this website must be credited if my articles are re-blogged, pressed, or shared.

—Thank You, oldpoet56, T.R.S.

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