Quake-stunned Puerto Rico hit by another 5.9-magnitude shock

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF NBC NEWS)

 

Quake-stunned Puerto Rico hit by another 5.9-magnitude shock

The earthquake hit as the island’s residents were already reeling from a series of major temblors this week, including one with a 6.4 magnitude Tuesday that was the biggest in a century.
By Nicole Acevedo

A magnitude 5.9 shock hit Puerto Rico on Saturday morning as the island’s residents were already reeling from a series of major quakes this week, including one on Tuesday that was the biggest in a century.

The latest quake, which came around 9 a.m. local time, has caused even further damage, mainly in areas around the southern coast where hundreds of homes and schools had already collapsed from the Tuesday temblor that had a magnitude of 6.4.

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Saturday’s quake, which was initially calculated at magnitude 6.0, also left roughly 59,000 customers without power, according to the island’s power authority.

Witnesses said the temblor caused concrete debris from damaged buildings to topple into the streets, mainly around the southern area.

Image: Puerto Rico
A man sits on a shade in the street where structures are collapsed after an earthquake struck Guanica, Puerto Rico, on Jan. 7, 2020.Carlos Giusti / AP file

Randy Baldwin, a geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey, said that the 6.0 magnitude quake is considered an aftershock along with several other 5.0 magnitude aftershocks overnight.

“The one this morning is the strongest one” since the big earthquake on Tuesday.

Gov. Wanda Vázquez said Saturday afternoon that she had declared a major state emergency after an initial assessment of damage following the latest temblor.

The governor also announced the immediate disbursement of $2 million for the hard-hit towns of Guánica, Utuado, Guayanilla, Peñuelas, Ponce and Yauco, which are all near the epicenter of the quakes, to meet their most pressing needs.

The quakes have caused $110 million in damages and have destroyed at least 559 structures islandwide, she said.

Hundreds of quakes and aftershocks have shaken the island since the new year, according to U.S. Geological Survey data.

7 Most Earthquake-Prone Cities in the World

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

7 Most Earthquake-Prone Cities in the World

According to the United States Geological Survey, the largest earthquake ever recorded in the United States happened in Prince William Sound in Alaska in 1964. That earthquake measured at the incredible magnitude of 9.2 on the Richter scale. And while earthquakes aren’t unusual for the area, they are usually much less severe. Prince William Sound experiences far fewer earthquakes than a lot of other cities around the world. Some areas in the Pacific measure seismic activity on an almost daily basis thanks to the Ring of Fire. The plate is in almost constant motion, according to CNN, and is home to several volcanoes as well.

But earthquakes aren’t exclusive to the Ring of Fire. They happen all over the world every day. Here are the seven cities where you are most likely to experience an earthquake.

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Quito, Ecuador

Quito, Ecuador

Credit: Andrew Linscott/ iStock

According to Earthquake Track, Quito has experienced 15 earthquakes with a magnitude of 1.5 or greater in the last year. And while the majority of those are too slight for most residents to feel, the city is no stranger to major earthquakes. Those earthquakes register 7.0 or more on the Richter scale. According to Reuters, a 7.5 magnitude earthquake struck the Peru–Ecuador border, shaking residents in the capital city of Quito. Earthquakes of a similar magnitude killed one person in 2018 and more than 700 in 2016.

Lima, Peru

Lima, Peru

Credit: Christian Vinces/ Shutterstock

Earthquake Track reports 14 earthquakes in Lima in the last year, with Volcano Discovery reporting more than 340 for the country as a whole. That’s in line with what Ecuador experiences each year. What’s interesting about Lima’s earthquake history is just how far back it goes. There are records of earthquakes going back to the 16th century. According to Lima Easy, major earthquakes in 1533 and 1555 rocked the capital city. Trip Savvy reports there is a major earthquake in the region about once every six years.

Manila, Philippines

Manila, Philippines

Credit: Nikada/ iStock

The Philippines experiences frequent seismic activity because of its location. That’s because the country, and its capital Manila, sits on top of multiple shifting tectonic plates converging in the Pacific Ocean. ABS CBN news network reports that 20 earthquakes each day is an average for the area. While the majority of these earthquakes are not felt on the surface, Manila experiences stronger earthquakes with disturbing frequency. In April of 2019, Manila experienced an earthquake with a magnitude of 6.1 during Monday’s rush hour.

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Istanbul, Turkey

Istanbul, Turkey

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The Hurriyet Daily News reports that the Kandilli Observatory in Istanbul records about 10,000 earthquakes in Turkey every year. The capital city of Istanbul sits near the North Anatolian Fault. Three major universities are warning that things could get worse, according to newspaper Daily Sabah. In a joint-issued study, researchers warn that the city should prepare for a series of earthquakes. They predict three earthquakes measuring higher than 7.0 on the Richter Scale could strike in the near future.

Los Angeles, California, USA

Los Angeles, California, USA

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According to the United States Geological Survey, Southern California experiences about 10,000 earthquakes each year. Los Angeles sits in the middle of a lot of the action. Of all those quakes, though, only about 15 measure at 4.0 or greater on the Richter scale. Earthquakes above the 4.0 mark are usually strong enough that the city’s several million residents feel the tremors. The cause of all these earthquakes lies with the San Andreas fault, according to the Southern California Earthquake Center. This is where the Pacific and North American plates of the earth push together. That friction produces thousands of small earthquakes each year.

Jakarta, Indonesia

Jakarta, Indonesia

Credit: Aleksandar Todorovic/ Shutterstock

Jakarta is another city with an unfortunate position on the Ring of Fire. The Straits Times reported that Indonesia experienced more than 11,500 earthquakes in 2018, and those numbers appear to be growing. Previous years averaged around 6,000 earthquakes. While no one can account for the increase in activity, Jakarta is doing its part to get prepared. According to the Jakarta Post, the Meteorology, Climatology, and Geophysics Agency presented a paper on how vulnerable the city is to a massive earthquake and how to mitigate the potential damage. There are over 800 high-rise buildings in the city that would be vulnerable in the event of a major earthquake. Measures are being taken to prepare both the citizens and the infrastructure for the next big quake.

Tokyo, Japan

Tokyo, Japan

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According to the Meteorological Agency of Japan, about one in ten earthquakes measured in the world happen in Japan. The country can experience thousands of earthquakes every year, though most of them are too small in magnitude to feel on the surface. The reason the country experiences so many earthquakes is thanks to its direct position over the Ring of Fire, where the tectonic plates below the country are in almost constant motion.

Tokyo has a long history of suffering from earthquake-related damages. The good news is that most households and businesses are prepared for an earthquake to strike. Not only are buildings constructed to withstand the swaying motion of the earth, but most have an earthquake kit on hand. The kits contain enough food, water, and medical supplies to last for several days.

Deadly 6.8 Earthquake His Mindanao Philippines

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

6-year-old girl among 3 killed as 6.8-magnitude earthquake rocks southern Philippines

Sunday's quake is the latest in a serious to strike the island in recent months.

Manila, Philippines (CNN)A six-year-old girl was among three people killed when a 6.8-magnitude earthquake struck the southern Philippines island of Mindanao on Sunday.

The girl was inside her family’s house when the building collapsed and killed her, the province’s governor, Douglas Cagas, told CNN.
The quake struck the island of Mindanao and its largest city, Davao.

Fire Service director Chief Superintendent Samuel Tadeo confirmed the three deaths and also said a market in Padada had collapsed.
The country’s second-largest island is a popular tourist destination, and videos posted on social media showed hotel pools dramatically overflowing and mass evacuations of shoppers from malls.
Residents reported schools had been severely damaged — luckily empty of students at the time, as the quake happened on a Sunday. Governor Douglas Cagas of the island’s Davao del Sur province said a three-story building had also collapsed.
Classes have now been suspended for Monday, and bridges closed due to cracks, Davao city officials said.
The country’s President Rodrigo Duterte was at his home in Davao, the largest city on the island, at the time of the quake, reported state-run Philippine News Agency (PNA). He was unhurt, although his house reportedly “sustained several cracks in the walls.”
There were several aftershocks in nearby provinces, including a 5.0 magnitude, according to the US Geological Survey. It added that there was no tsunami threat, as the quake struck inland and not the water.
It’s the latest in a serious of quakes to strike the island in recent months. In October another series of 6.6 and 6.5-magnitude quakes struck Mindanao, killing 14 and injuring more than 400.

Japan: 6.3-magnitude earthquake hits northeastern Japan

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE INDIAN NEWS AGENCY THE HINDUSTAN TIMES)

 

6.3-magnitude earthquake hits northeastern Japan, no tsunami threat

The quake jolted large areas in the region at 7:23 pm (1023 GMT) with its epicentre located 54 kilometres (34 miles) east of Namie, eastern Fukushima, according to the US Geological Survey said.

WORLD Updated: Aug 04, 2019 19:20 IST

Press Trust of India
Press Trust of India

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A strong 6.3-magnitude earthquake struck in the Pacific off Fukushima, northeastern Japan, on Sunday, but there was no tsunami threat
A strong 6.3-magnitude earthquake struck in the Pacific off Fukushima, northeastern Japan, on Sunday, but there was no tsunami threat(HT Photo)

A strong 6.3-magnitude earthquake struck in the Pacific off Fukushima, northeastern Japan, on Sunday, but there was no tsunami threat, US and Japanese authorities said.

The quake jolted large areas in the region at 7:23 pm (1023 GMT) with its epicentre located 54 kilometres (34 miles) east of Namie, eastern Fukushima, according to the US Geological Survey said.

The quake was also felt in Tokyo.

The Japan Meteorological Agency said there were no worries about tsunami damage.

The weather agency issued an emergency warning when the quake hit, but there was no immediate report of injuries or damage.

Shinkansen bullet train services were temporarily suspended in the region, public broadcaster NHK said.

No abnormality was detected at nuclear plants in the region, including the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, NHK said.

More than 18,000 were killed after a 9.0-magnitude earthquake triggered a massive tsunami on March 11, 2011, leading to the meltdown of reactors at the Fukushima plant.

Japan sits at the junction of four tectonic plates and experiences a number of relatively violent quakes every year.

(This story has been published from a wire agency feed without modifications to the text. Only the headline has been changed.)

First Published: Aug 04, 2019 17:30 IST

10 Things You Never Knew About the Pacific Ocean

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

10 Things You Never Knew About the Pacific Ocean

As a source of oxygen and food, a means of climate regulation and transportation, and the supporter of one of the world’s biggest economies, it’s safe to say that oceans are our livelihood. With all the oceans do for us, it may be surprising to learn that humans have only discovered about 5% of what lies beneath. With so much left uncovered, it’s clear there’s a lot more to explore.

While we wait for the remaining 95% of the oceans to be discovered, let’s delve deeper into the biggest and baddest of them all — the Pacific Ocean. Here are 10 things you might not know about the Pacific Ocean.

It’s the Biggest Ocean in the World

Credit: nektofadeev/Shutterstock

We just said that, but it deserves to be stated again for the record. The Pacific Ocean spans from California to China, covering an incredible 60 million square miles. Let’s put that size into perspective; if you accumulated all the world’s landmasses together, the Pacific Ocean would still be bigger.

It’s Also the Deepest Ocean in the World

Credit: Ethan Daniels/Shutterstock

Just as impressive as its size is the Pacific Ocean’s depth. The deepest point was found in 2010 in the Mariana Trench, an impossibly deep channel that bottoms out at just over 36,070 feet (roughly 7 miles deep). And just to put that into perspective, Mount Everest could be placed in the trench and still be covered by about a mile of water.

It Was Named for Its Pleasant Demeanor

Credit: Don Mammoser/Shutterstock

Despite its vast size and depth, the Pacific Ocean is also known, at times, for its peaceful waters. In fact, it was these characteristics that inspired Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan to name the ocean“Pacific” — meaning “calm” or “peaceful” — as he sailed through a serene patch of water in 1520.

It’s a Force of Nature

Credit: Phillip B. Espinasse/Shutterstock

With its sprawling size and warm waters, the Pacific Ocean is the breeding ground for some of the strongest hurricanes, cyclones and typhoons our planet has ever seen. Not only that, the Pacific Basin (aka The Ring of Fire) is a hub of seismic activity. The majority of earthquakes and volcanic activity take place along these tectonic plates.

It’s the Home of the Blob

Credit: Irina Markova/Shutterstock

Global warming is a growing problem, but do you know specifically how climate change has hurt our greatest ocean? There are many telltale signs, but perhaps the most shocking was the Blob, a mass of warm water that had harmful effects on the Pacific between 2014 to 2016. Residing in the Pacific Northwest, the Blob claimed responsibility for the death of hundreds of sea creatures. Many fear the Blob is a sign of what’s to come if humans don’t do their part to combat climate change.

It’s an Island Paradise

Credit: TWEITH/Shutterstock

The Pacific Ocean encompasses roughly 25,000 islands, most of which are south of the equator. That’s more than all the other islands in all the other bodies of water in the world combined. That’s good news for all you traveling beach bums out there — it means there’s no shortage of tropical destinations to choose from!

It’s a Goldmine and a Dumping Ground

Credit: Rich Carey/Shutterstock

The Pacific Ocean houses both treasure and tragedy. Australia, Japan, Panama, Nicaragua, the Philippines and Papua New Guinea all harvest pearls from the Pacific. On the contrary, the largest man-made dump in the world — dubbed the Great Pacific Garbage Patch — also exists in the Pacific Ocean. Located halfway between California and Hawaii, this pile of rubbish is twice the size of Texas and is mostly made up of microplastics and old fishing gear.

It Keeps Ancient Secrets

Credit: Hoiseung Jung/Shutterstock

Exploring underwater cities may seem like something better suited for a science fiction movie. However, there have been some real-life discoveries of past civilizations that now lie beneath the surface of our oceans. The most intriguing of these sites is in the Pacific Ocean. The underwater pyramids of Yonaguni Jima have scholars baffled and divers totally awe-struck. Some believe the ruins were once part of Mu,the legendary lost continent swallowed by the Pacific Ocean thousands of years ago.

It’s a Satellite Cemetery

Credit: TheOldhiro/Shutterstock

Point Nemo is widely acknowledged as the most remote place on earth. Located smack in the middle of the Pacific Ocean and 1,450 nautical miles from any landmass, many nations deorbit their satellites and old spacecrafts over this point. The space junk plummets into a watery grave, never to be seen or heard from again.

It’s Shrinking

Credit: canadastock/Shutterstock

As big, beautiful and mighty as it is, the Pacific Ocean is actually shrinking. As North America moves away from Europe, the size of the Atlantic Ocean slowly increases while the size of the Pacific decreases. The change is small — the Pacific Ocean loses approximately one inch per year.

Strong Earthquake Rocks Athens Greece

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CBS NEWS)

 

Athens, Greece – A strong earthquake hit Friday near the Greek capital of Athens, causing residents to run into the streets in fear and firefighters to check for people trapped in elevators. The Athens Institute of Geodynamics gave the earthquake a preliminary magnitude of 5.1 but the U.S. Geological Survey gave it a preliminary magnitude of 5.3.  The Athens Institute says the quake struck at 2:13 p.m. local time about 13.7 miles north of Athens.

Earthquake in Athens
Damaged buildings in city’s downtown are seen following an earthquake in Athens, Greece, July 19, 2019.ALKIS KONSTANTINIDIS / REUTERS

The quake sparked limited power cuts and communication problems around Athens and the fire brigade reported receiving calls about people being trapped in elevators. The shock was caught live in the studios of state broadcaster ERT.

Authorities inspected areas close to the epicenter by helicopter and police patrols but no deaths or serious injuries were reported. Government spokesman Stelios Petsas said one abandoned building had collapsed in a western district of Athens and that several other abandoned buildings had suffered serious damages in other parts of the city.

“There are no reports of serious injuries … I urge members of the public to remains calm, in Greece we are well acquainted with earthquakes,” he said.

The most powerful quake to hit the Greek capital in the last 20 years came in 1999, when a temblor of magnitude 6.0 caused extensive damage and killed more than 140 people.

Gerasimos Papadopoulos, the senior seismologist at the Geodynamics Institute said Friday’s quake was felt across southern Greece.

“It had a very shallow depth and that’s why it was felt so strongly,” he said. “It is too early to say whether this was the main earthquake, but there have been aftershocks of magnitude 3.5, 2.5 and 3.2 and that is encouraging. But we need more time and data to have a clear picture.”

Earthquake in Greece
A firefighter stands next to a partly demolished structure following an earthquake, at the port of Piraeus, near Athens, Greece, July 19, 2019.ALKIS KONSTANTINIDIS / REUTERS

Earthquakes are common in Greece and neighboring Turkey.

The head of the anti-quake protection agency, Efthymios Lekkas, told Greeks to remain calm, BBC News reported. “There is no reason for concern. The capital’s buildings are built to withstand a much stronger earthquake,” he said.

greece-quake.jpg
The quake struck about 13.7 miles north of Athens.U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

Surface Rupture from Ridgecrest Earthquake Spotted from Space (Photo)

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF SPACE.COM)

 

Surface Rupture from Ridgecrest Earthquake Spotted from Space (Photo)

A new rupture in Earth's crust caused by a magnitude-7.1 earthquake near Ridgecrest, California, is seen in this July 6, 2019, image by a Dove cubesat, operated by San Francisco-based company Planet.

A new rupture in Earth’s crust caused by a magnitude-7.1 earthquake near Ridgecrest, California, is seen in this July 6, 2019, image by a Dove cubesat, operated by San Francisco-based company Planet.
(Image: © Planet Labs Inc.)

One of last week’s powerful Southern California earthquakes created a crack in the planet’s crust that’s visible from space.

Photos snapped on Saturday (July 6) by tiny Earth-observing Dove satellites, which are built and operated by San Francisco-based company Planet, show a new surface rupture near the desert town of Ridgecrest, about 125 miles (200 kilometers) northeast of Los Angeles.

A day earlier, the Ridgecrest region had been rocked by a 7.1-magnitude temblor — the most powerful quake to hit Southern California in two decades. And Friday’s quake was far from alone; it followed on the heels of a 6.4-magnitude tremor that hit the area Thursday (July 4) and spawned a swarm of less powerful aftershocks.

A new rupture in Earth's crust caused by a magnitude-7.1 earthquake near Ridgecrest, California, is seen in these before-and-after views, captured on July 4 and July 6, 2019, by Dove cubesats operated by San Francisco-based company Planet.

A new rupture in Earth’s crust caused by a magnitude-7.1 earthquake near Ridgecrest, California, is seen in these before-and-after views, captured on July 4 and July 6, 2019, by Dove cubesats operated by San Francisco-based company Planet.

The quakes damaged some buildings near the epicenter but apparently caused no serious injuries, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Planet’s Dove cubesats are tiny but extremely capable: Their bodies are smaller than a loaf of bread, but the craft can capture photos with a resolution of 10 feet to 16.5 feet (3 to 5 meters). Planet (previously known as Planet Labs) currently has more than 100 operational Doves in low-Earth orbit, whose imagery the company sells to a variety of customers.

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Southern California is rumbling with about one aftershock every minute

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

The earth under Southern California is rumbling with about one aftershock every minute

earthquake southern california sidner vpx_00000028

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Now Playing 7.1 earthquake strikes…
7.1 earthquake strikes Southern California 01:53

(CNN)The earth hasn’t stopped rumbling under Southern California since Thursday, when a powerful 6.4-magnitude earthquake rattled Ridgecrest and the surrounding area.

The quake was followed by more than 1,400 aftershocks, according to scientists. On Friday, an even stronger quake — with a magnitude of 7.1 — rattled the region, leaving residents traumatized, Ridgecrest Mayor Peggy Breeden said Saturday morning.
“Many of them are sleeping outside tonight,” Breeden said. “They’re fearful to be in their homes. Many are choosing to just be with their neighbors … in their sidewalks, in their driveways and some of them are in the streets.”
There’s been an average of one aftershock per minute since Friday’s quake in the southern part of the state, according to the United States Geological Survey website.
A screnshot of the aftershocks recorded by USGS after the 7.1 magnitude earthquake.

After an earthquake as powerful as the one that hit Friday, residents can expect an aftershock reaching up to a magnitude of 6.0, officials said Saturday, and should even be prepared for a scarier shake.

‘Constant vibration’

“I would probably start taking some stuff off the walls if they’re not already down,” Ridgecrest Police Chief Jed McLaughlin said Saturday morning. “Make sure you’re not sleeping under something that’s still hung up.”
The chief warned residents to stay prepared and load up on supplies while stores are still open, “just in case that we have something bigger than we had today.”
He said residents should remain vigilant for the next two weeks.
State leaders for emergency management are coordinating mutual aid and regional response from State Operations Center - focused on meeting the need in the Ridgecrest/Kern Co area.

“This isn’t going to stop in the near future,” he said. “The aftershocks, they haven’t slowed down since the 7.1 (magnitude earthquake). For a period of time there was constant vibration.”
The constant aftershocks are keeping everyone on edge, Ridgecrest resident and Jessica Weston told CNN’s Cyril Vanier Saturday.
“It’s fairly frequent, especially since the big one hit this evening it feels like a tiny little earthquake,” Weston said. “Everybody’s on edge obviously because as soon as you feel that little rumble… of course we’re all wondering is this another big one.”
Weston said she was driving with her mom when the earthquake hit Friday, and “the car just kind of bounces up and down.”
“In my experience, (it’s) the least scary place to be. It’s way scarier when you feel the floor kind of like pulling out from under you and you wonder what’s going to fall on your head,” she said.
Weston said she plans to sleep in the back of her car, where she feels safer.

5.0 and 6.0 magnitude earthquakes possible

CalTech seismologist Lucy Jones said in a press conference Friday both the Thursday and Friday earthquakes were part of an ongoing “very energetic system.”
The second quake released more than 11 times the energy of the first earthquake, CNN Meteorologist Brandon Miller said.
Officials are not ruling out the possibility of more. Jones said early Saturday there’s about a 10% chance that Searles Valley will see another 7.0-magnitude earthquake.
“Today’s M7.1 has a 1 in 20 of being followed by something even bigger,” she said. “Smaller quakes — M5s are likely and a M6 is quite possible.”

A community that didn’t get to recover

Ridgecrest had begun clearing up the damage from Thursday’s shock when it was hit again a day later.
The 6.4 Thursday quake was followed by more than 1,000 aftershocks. Fires broke out, gas lines were broken and a major hospital was evacuated, the mayor said that night.
A fire breaks out behind the Casa Corona restaurant following an earthquake in Ridgecrest, California on July 5, 2019.

A day later, the same images: multiple fires, and patients being wheeled out of the hospital, some still hooked to IVs.
“It is not an impossible task to take care of all this,” Breeden said. “But it is going to be a longer task than we thought the other day.”
Azzam Fatala, a market owner in Trona, an unincorporated community in neighboring San Bernardino County was cleaning merchandise and broken bottles off his store’s floor Friday morning .
“What are you going to do? What are you going to start with? What shelf? How much money was lost?” he told CNN affiliate KFSN.
And after Friday night, Fatala’s store had even more losses, the affiliate reported.
The small town of about 2,000 had no power or water Saturday morning, San Bernardino County Fire spokesman told CNN.

A New 7.1 Earthquake Has Struck Southern California

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CNN)

 

A 7.1-magnitude earthquake hit Southern California on Friday night — the second one near Ridgecrest in less than two days.

The latest earthquake occurred 11 miles northeast of Ridgecrest, according to the US Geological Survey.
It comes a day after a 6.4-magnitude earthquake centered near Ridgecrest rattled the state Thursday. That earthquake has produced more than 1,400 aftershocks, scientists said.
Multiple fires and injuries have been reported in Ridgecrest — about 150 miles from Los Angeles — after Friday’s earthquake, Kern County spokeswoman Megan Person told CNN. An emergency operations center is being set up in Bakersfield, she said.
In central Los Angeles, Friday’s earthquake felt stronger than the one a day earlier, making buildings rock back and forth forcefully. Donald Castle, who lives in Porterville west of Ridgecrest, said his house shook for between 20 and 25 seconds.
“It was more of a shake than what we had on the Fourth. It lasted longer and was more rolling,” he said.
The shaking was felt all the way in Las Vegas, much like the earthquake a day earlier.
The NBA Summer League game between the New Orleans Pelicans and the New York Knicks in Las Vegas was delayed Friday following reports of the quake. Scoreboards and speakers near the ceiling of the arena shook when the earthquake hit.
Public safety units are being deployed throughout the city ” to ensure safety and inspect infrastructure,” Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said.
Noted seismologist Lucy Jones said Friday both earthquakes are part of an ongoing sequence, of a “very energetic system.”
Officials are not ruling out that there could be more earthquakes coming.
This is a developing story, please check in for updates.

China: 13 injured in Sichuan aftershock

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF SHANGHAI CHINA’S ‘SHINE’ NEWS NETWORK)

 

13 injured in Sichuan aftershock

Xinhua
13 injured in Sichuan aftershock

Imaginechina

A house is damaged in Gongxian County in Sichuan Province.

At least 13 people were injured after a 5.6-magnitude aftershock jolted southwestern China’s Sichuan Province Thursday.

A 5.6-magnitude earthquake hit Gongxian County at 10:17am. The epicenter was monitored at 28.41 degrees north latitude and 104.74 degrees east longitude, according to the China Earthquake Networks Center. The quake struck at a depth of 8 km.

The county government said as of 2:30pm, 13 injured residents have been sent to hospital for treatment.

Experts said the moderate quake was an aftershock after a 6.0-magnitude earthquake occurred in Changning County in mid-June, which killed 13 people, and aftershocks in the area will continue for a long period of time.

The aftershock exacerbated house and infrastructure damages and personnel have been dispatched to repair damaged roads, according to the local government.

A total of 62 aftershocks with magnitude above 3.0 have been recorded since the Changning earthquake, and the latest aftershock in Gongxian was the largest one, according to the provincial seismological bureau.

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