Author warns that Trump ‘will not exit quietly,’ even if defeated or impeached

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE USA TODAY NEWS)

 

‘Anonymous’ author warns that Trump ‘will not exit quietly,’ even if defeated or impeached

USA TODAY

The anonymous official who has written a scathing account of the presidency of Donald Trump suggests the president might refuse to leave office even if convicted in impeachment hearings or defeated narrowly in the 2020 election – and says Trump is preparing his followers to see either outcome as a “coup” that could warrant resistance.

“He will not exit quietly – or easily,” the author, self-described as a senior administration official, writes in A Warning, a book that builds on an explosive op-ed by the same unnamed author last year. USA TODAY obtained an early copy of the book.

“It is why at many turns he suggests ‘coups’ are afoot and a ‘civil war’ is in the offing. He is already seeding the narrative for his followers – a narrative that could end tragically.”

From ‘Anonymous’:Read key excerpts from inside Trump White House on Putin, Pence, Hillary

As the House of Representatives prepares to open public impeachment hearings Wednesday, the book also says that Trump ordered aides more than a year ago to pursue a “deliberate and coordinated campaign” to obstruct an impeachment inquiry and other congressional investigations. House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff has said he is considering obstruction of Congress as a possible Article of Impeachment.

The book’s author is identified only as “a senior official in the Trump administration,” and its forthcoming publication has created a firestorm over both its depiction of a dysfunctional president and the decision by the writer to remain anonymous.

Cover of "A Warning" by an anonymous senior Trump administration official.

“The coward who wrote this book didn’t put their name on it because it is nothing but lies,” White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham said.

Many of the disclosures echo news stories that have portrayed the president as impulsive, sometimes uninformed and regularly willing to defy established norms. There is already no shortage of books by Trump critics, including former FBI director James Comey and others who have served in his administration, that raise questions about the president’s fitness for office.

But The New York Times op-ed in 2018 and the new book, being published next Tuesday by Twelve, have commanded enormous attention because the author had an inside view, often participating in small White House meetings where crucial decisions were made.

The author portrays himself or herself as sharing some policy views with Trump and initially having a positive if wary view of the possibilities of his presidency.

The author says the intended audience for A Warning isn’t those who closely follow politics but rather those who don’t, particularly voters from across the country who were drawn in 2016 to Trump’s promise to shake up the establishment.

Dropping Pence from the ticket?

The book says that Trump “on more than one occasion” discussed with staffers the possibility of dropping Vice President Mike Pence before the 2020 election.

“Former UN ambassador Nikki Haley was under active consideration to step in as vice president, which she did not discourage at first,” the author writes, saying some advisers argued that putting Haley on the ticket would help the president bolster his support among female voters.

In an interview Friday with USA TODAY, Nikki Haley dismissed out of hand the suggestion that she might replace Pence. In her new book, With All Due Respect, Haley offers a generally positive portrait of Trump, and the president rewarded her with a friendly tweet urging his millions of followers to buy a copy.

Pathway of impeachment:How it works, where we are

“Anonymous” depicts Trump as impatient, immoral, cruel, even dangerous as he rejects the limits placed on presidents by Congress and the courts.

As the 2018 midterm elections approached, the book says, the White House counsel’s office began to develop a “contingency plan” to shield the administration if Democrats gained control of Congress, and with that the ability to launch investigations and issue subpoenas. New lawyers were hired and internal procedures revamped, the author writes.

“The goal wasn’t just to prepare for a barrage of legislative requests,” the book says. “It was a concerted attempt to fend off congressional oversight. When Democrats finally took the House, the unspoken administration policy toward Capitol Hill became: Give as little as possible, wait as long as possible. Even routine inquiries are now routed to the lawyers, who have found unique ways to say “We can’t right now,” “Give us a few months,” “We’re going to need to put you on hold,” “Probably not,” “No,” and “Not a chance in hell.”

Trump impeachment inquiry:Early findings and how Republicans are opposing them

The author says the administration’s refusal to comply with congressional requests and even subpoenas “go beyond standard practice and have turned into a full block-and-tackle exercise against congressional investigators across an array of Trump administration controversies.”

On the president’s actions with Ukraine, now the heart of the impeachment inquiry, the author writes that the idea Trump was trying to battle corruption abroad – rather than gain some partisan political advantage at home – was “barely believable to anyone around him.”

But the book provides no significant new information or insights into that episode.

‘Get Out of Jail Free’ cards

The author’s agent, Matt Latimer, said the author didn’t take an advance payment for the book and plans to donate a substantial amount of the royalties to nonprofit organizations that encourage government accountability and an independent press.

Among other allegations, the book says:

  • Several top advisers and Cabinet-level officials last year discussed a mass resignation, “a midnight self-massacre,” intended to call attention to what they saw as Trump’s questionable and even corrupt behavior. “The idea was abandoned out of fear that it would make a bad situation worse.”
  • If a majority of the Cabinet called for Trump’s removal under the rules of the 25th Amendment, Pence would have been willing to go along with them. But the author provides no evidence to back up that assertion, and Pence in recent days has strongly denied it.
  • Trump told officials that, if they took illegal actions on his behalf, he would give them presidential pardons. “To Donald Trump, these are unlimited ‘Get Out of Jail Free’ cards on a Monopoly board.”
  • Trump was “particularly frustrated that the Justice Department hasn’t done more to harass the Clintons.” The president suggested to his first Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, that he might “un-recuse” himself from the Mueller inquiry into Russian election interference, presumably so he would feel free to order a more aggressive inquiry into Trump’s 2016 opponent. “You’d be a hero,” the president told him.

Author warns that Trump ‘will not exit quietly,’ even if defeated or impeached

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF THE USA TODAY NEWS)

 

‘Anonymous’ author warns that Trump ‘will not exit quietly,’ even if defeated or impeached

USA TODAY

The anonymous official who has written a scathing account of the presidency of Donald Trump suggests the president might refuse to leave office even if convicted in impeachment hearings or defeated narrowly in the 2020 election – and says Trump is preparing his followers to see either outcome as a “coup” that could warrant resistance.

“He will not exit quietly – or easily,” the author, self-described as a senior administration official, writes in A Warning, a book that builds on an explosive op-ed by the same unnamed author last year. USA TODAY obtained an early copy of the book.

“It is why at many turns he suggests ‘coups’ are afoot and a ‘civil war’ is in the offing. He is already seeding the narrative for his followers – a narrative that could end tragically.”

From ‘Anonymous’:Read key excerpts from inside Trump White House on Putin, Pence, Hillary

As the House of Representatives prepares to open public impeachment hearings Wednesday, the book also says that Trump ordered aides more than a year ago to pursue a “deliberate and coordinated campaign” to obstruct an impeachment inquiry and other congressional investigations. House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff has said he is considering obstruction of Congress as a possible Article of Impeachment.

The book’s author is identified only as “a senior official in the Trump administration,” and its forthcoming publication has created a firestorm over both its depiction of a dysfunctional president and the decision by the writer to remain anonymous.

Cover of "A Warning" by an anonymous senior Trump administration official.

“The coward who wrote this book didn’t put their name on it because it is nothing but lies,” White House Press Secretary Stephanie Grisham said.

Many of the disclosures echo news stories that have portrayed the president as impulsive, sometimes uninformed and regularly willing to defy established norms. There is already no shortage of books by Trump critics, including former FBI director James Comey and others who have served in his administration, that raise questions about the president’s fitness for office.

But The New York Times op-ed in 2018 and the new book, being published next Tuesday by Twelve, have commanded enormous attention because the author had an inside view, often participating in small White House meetings where crucial decisions were made.

The author portrays himself or herself as sharing some policy views with Trump and initially having a positive if wary view of the possibilities of his presidency.

The author says the intended audience for A Warning isn’t those who closely follow politics but rather those who don’t, particularly voters from across the country who were drawn in 2016 to Trump’s promise to shake up the establishment.

Dropping Pence from the ticket?

The book says that Trump “on more than one occasion” discussed with staffers the possibility of dropping Vice President Mike Pence before the 2020 election.

“Former UN ambassador Nikki Haley was under active consideration to step in as vice president, which she did not discourage at first,” the author writes, saying some advisers argued that putting Haley on the ticket would help the president bolster his support among female voters.

In an interview Friday with USA TODAY, Nikki Haley dismissed out of hand the suggestion that she might replace Pence. In her new book, With All Due Respect, Haley offers a generally positive portrait of Trump, and the president rewarded her with a friendly tweet urging his millions of followers to buy a copy.

Pathway of impeachment:How it works, where we are

“Anonymous” depicts Trump as impatient, immoral, cruel, even dangerous as he rejects the limits placed on presidents by Congress and the courts.

As the 2018 midterm elections approached, the book says, the White House counsel’s office began to develop a “contingency plan” to shield the administration if Democrats gained control of Congress, and with that the ability to launch investigations and issue subpoenas. New lawyers were hired and internal procedures revamped, the author writes.

“The goal wasn’t just to prepare for a barrage of legislative requests,” the book says. “It was a concerted attempt to fend off congressional oversight. When Democrats finally took the House, the unspoken administration policy toward Capitol Hill became: Give as little as possible, wait as long as possible. Even routine inquiries are now routed to the lawyers, who have found unique ways to say “We can’t right now,” “Give us a few months,” “We’re going to need to put you on hold,” “Probably not,” “No,” and “Not a chance in hell.”

Trump impeachment inquiry:Early findings and how Republicans are opposing them

The author says the administration’s refusal to comply with congressional requests and even subpoenas “go beyond standard practice and have turned into a full block-and-tackle exercise against congressional investigators across an array of Trump administration controversies.”

On the president’s actions with Ukraine, now the heart of the impeachment inquiry, the author writes that the idea Trump was trying to battle corruption abroad – rather than gain some partisan political advantage at home – was “barely believable to anyone around him.”

But the book provides no significant new information or insights into that episode.

‘Get Out of Jail Free’ cards

The author’s agent, Matt Latimer, said the author didn’t take an advance payment for the book and plans to donate a substantial amount of the royalties to nonprofit organizations that encourage government accountability and an independent press.

Among other allegations, the book says:

  • Several top advisers and Cabinet-level officials last year discussed a mass resignation, “a midnight self-massacre,” intended to call attention to what they saw as Trump’s questionable and even corrupt behavior. “The idea was abandoned out of fear that it would make a bad situation worse.”
  • If a majority of the Cabinet called for Trump’s removal under the rules of the 25th Amendment, Pence would have been willing to go along with them. But the author provides no evidence to back up that assertion, and Pence in recent days has strongly denied it.
  • Trump told officials that, if they took illegal actions on his behalf, he would give them presidential pardons. “To Donald Trump, these are unlimited ‘Get Out of Jail Free’ cards on a Monopoly board.”
  • Trump was “particularly frustrated that the Justice Department hasn’t done more to harass the Clintons.” The president suggested to his first Attorney General, Jeff Sessions, that he might “un-recuse” himself from the Mueller inquiry into Russian election interference, presumably so he would feel free to order a more aggressive inquiry into Trump’s 2016 opponent. “You’d be a hero,” the president told him.

The 10 Most-read Magazines of 2018

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

The most-read magazines of 2018

The full-color, glossy, national-circulation magazine format is a survivor. Despite the rise of the internet and the decline of bookstores and newsstands, and unlike their print-format cousin the daily newspaper, magazines are holding their own in the 21st century. In the U.S. alone, hundreds of titles still enjoy wide circulation and cover myriad topics, from archery to zoology. Hundreds more niche publications and trade journals are also still delivered in print form.

Long gone, of course, are many of the general-interest magazines of yesteryear, and the once-strong newsweeklies, such as Newsweek and U.S. News and World Report, have also declined in popularity, perhaps victims of the internet’s up-to-the-second delivery of news content.

That being the case, what are now the most widely read magazines? The list includes some old standbys and some newer surprises. Here are the top 10 magazines of 2018 by U.S. paid circulation, according to the Agility PR Solutions media consulting group.

10. Reader’s Digest

Credit: Yoeml / Shutterstock.com

An island of wholesome, uplifting, and humorous content in an increasingly fractious and polarized era, Reader’s Digest has been in business since 1922. It’s now available in 21 languages (plus a Braille edition) and circulated in over 70 countries, making it the most widely-read magazine internationally, even if it’s just at #10 on the American list.

9. National Geographic

Credit: Elnur / Shutterstock.com

First published in 1888, National Geographic has been filling up basements and attics for generations. But crack it open and you’re in for a world of insightful knowledge and breathtaking imagery. It’s known for its in-depth coverage, stunning photography, and wide range of subject matter, from the bottom of the ocean to the far reaches of space and everything in between.

8. People

Credit: Lya_Cattel / iStock

We as a society may be a little fuzzy on the inner workings of the Federal Reserve or the pros and cons of the Import-Export Bank, but we definitely have a grasp of celebrity gossip, and People has been dishing it out every week since 1974.

7. Family Circle

Credit: Niloo / Shutterstock.com

Not to be confused with the long-running comic panel Family CircusFamily Circle is aimed at keeping families healthy, well-fed, and wholesomely entertained, with recipes, tips, and ideas for vacation activities, holiday decorations, and more.

6. Good Housekeeping

Credit: Lya_Cattel / iStock

Good Housekeeping covers much of the same ground as Family Circle, and has been doing it a lot longer — since 1885. Good Housekeeping and Family Circle are among the “Seven Sisters” of what are traditionally known as “women’s magazines.” Spoiler alert: There are more Sisters in this list.

5. Game Informer

Credit: Lya_Cattel / iStock

Think video games are just time-sucks for idle teenagers to fry their brains with? Think again: Video games are big business, ensnaring kids and adults alike. For players who can tear themselves away from their joysticks long enough, Game Informer is there to provide game reviews, play tips, and more.

4. Better Homes and Gardens

Credit: digital reflections / Shutterstock.com

Another of the Seven Sisters, Better Homes and Gardens skews more towards interior decoration, gardening, and landscaping but still has significant coverage for recipes and family entertainment.

3. Woman’s Day

Credit: anouchka / iStock

The next time you’re waiting in the checkout line at the grocery store, take a gander at the magazines on display. You’ll notice that many of them are represented in this list, and Woman’s Day is no exception. Perhaps it’s no coincidence that Woman’s Day was first published in 1931 by the Great Atlantic and Pacific Tea Company, better known as the (now defunct) A&P supermarket chain.

2. AARP Magazine & 1. AARP Bulletin

Credit: Por Jer123 / Shutterstock.com

That both of the top two most widely read magazines in the U.S. are published by the American Association of Retired Persons says something about our society, and that something is: We aren’t getting any younger. With circulations of over 23 million each, these two titles cover a wide variety of topics of interest to the 50-plus crowd, such as healthcare, retirement financing, and entertainment.

5 Largest Libraries in the World

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRAVEL TRIVIA)

 

Largest Libraries in the World

Collectively, the five largest libraries in the world hold a staggering 467.4 million items, according to World Atlas. That’s millions of books, magazines, journals, music records, maps and other artifacts, all available for the public’s consumption. From rare manuscripts to pancake recipes, these distinguished institutions hold treasures of every kind. Ranked in order of items cataloged, here are the five largest libraries in the world.

Russian State Library

Russian State Library

Credit: Roman Babakin/Shutterstock

44.4 Million Items

Founded in 1862, the Russian State Library has been through many iterations in the past 157 years. Originally founded as the Rumyantsev Museum, it began as a collection of rare books and manuscripts belonging to Count Nikolay Rumyantsev. After it was relocated from St. Petersburg to Moscow, the Rumyantsev Museum was housed in the Pashkov House, just outside of the Kremlin walls. Today, this building is home to the library’s impressive music section. It wasn’t until after 1917 that the museum transformed into a national archive and a new building was built to contain the country’s growing collection of books, journals and maps. In 1924, the library was renamed V.I. Lenin State Library of the U.S.S.R. and it is still called “Leninka” by locals today. In 1992, the library changed its name once more to the Russian State Library.

Library and Archives, Canada

Library and Archives, Canada

Credit: Bing Wen/Shutterstock

54 Million Items

Located in the Canadian capital of Ottawa, the country’s Library and Archives is a federal institution dedicated to preserving Canada’s heritage. The library’s archives are available to the public and are extremely thorough in their provision of national records. The library has a collection on Canadian census records from 1640 to 1926, immigration records from 1865 to 1935 and an entire section dedicated to genealogy and family history. The museum also works to preserve Indigenous cultures, with materials that represent First Nations, Inuit and Metis Nation experiences. Formed as recently as 2004, the library was created when the National Archives of Canada joined with the National Library of Canada.

New York Public Library

New York Public Library

Credit: travelview/Shutterstock

55 Million Items

The New York Public Library consists of 92 libraries located throughout the Bronx, Manhattan and Staten Island. With four major research libraries and 88 branch libraries, the main branch is located on Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street in Manhattan. Situated in Bryant Park, the building is a notable example of  Beaux-Arts architecture and was named a National Historic Landmark in 1965. Its impressive collection of items includes maps, music, books and periodicals. During World War II, the Allies used the museum’s map collection to study the coastlines of opposing countries. An incredible resource for New Yorkers, the public library went as far as providing free movie streaming to its members. Unfortunately, it was recently announced that this service will soon be canceled, as it is no longer part of the library’s budget.

British Library

British Library

Credit: Iain McGillivray/Shutterstock

150 Million Items

The national library of the United Kingdom, the British Library is an impressive modern building located in the heart of London. The library’s massive collection includes books, patents, stamps, newspapers, sound recordings, maps and musical scores. The main branch library has a basement that extends 80 feet into the ground, where the temperature-controlled environment is ideal for preserving historical books, manuscripts and maps. Not only is this library home to books that belonged to King George III, but it also has a first edition copy of “The Canterbury Tales” by Geoffrey Chaucer. Among its numerous original manuscripts are Jane Austen’s “Persuasion” and an illustrated version of Lewis Carroll’s “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.”

Library of the U.S. Congress

Library of the U.S. Congress

Credit: Sean Pavone/Shutterstock

164 Million Items

The Library of the U.S. Congress is the largest library in the world. In 1800, when President John Adams approved a bill that moved the nation’s capital from Philadelphia to Washington, D.C., he also consented to the creation of this library. The bill stipulated that $5,000 be set aside for books to be referenced by Congress, and thus, the Library of the U.S. Congress was born. As such, it is the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and holds impressive items related to U.S. history, including a rough draft of the Declaration of Independence. Other unusual items include the contents of Abraham Lincoln’s pockets the night he was assassinated and a recipe for Rosa Parks’s pancakes. The library is open to the public for tours, which includes a guided tour of the Thomas Jefferson Building and the library’s exhibitions.

6 classic books you didn’t read in high school

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

6 classic books you didn’t read in high school

Classic novels are par for the course when it comes to required reading in high school. To Kill a Mockingbird, Of Mice and Men, The Great Gatsby, The Grapes of Wrath, and almost anything by William Shakespeare come to mind when most people imagine “the classics.” But hidden gems—books penned by renowned authors and recognizable names—often slip through the cracks.

Here are a handful of classic books worth your time that you likely didn’t read in high school.

Crome Yellow by Aldous Huxley

Credit: Natata / Shutterstock.com

Author Aldous Huxley is most famous for his oft-quoted, forever-relevant novel Brave New World. Although that book’s praise and dissection are hard to ignore, it’s Huxley’s first novel, Crome Yellow, that often slips past readers.

Crome Yellow was first published in 1921 and serves as a timely satire following a number of characters and stereotypes of the era. A synopsis from Goodreads:

On vacation from school, Denis goes to stay at Crome, an English country house inhabited by several of Huxley’s most outlandish characters — from Mr. Barbecue-Smith, who writes 1,500 publishable words an hour by “getting in touch” with his “subconscious,” to Henry Wimbush, who is obsessed with writing the definitive “History of Crome.” Denis’s stay proves to be a disaster amid his weak attempts to attract the girl of his dreams and the ridicule he endures regarding his plan to write a novel about love and art.

Slaughterhouse-Five by Kurt Vonnegut

Credit: @shitsheread / Instagram

Becoming unstuck in time has turned into a modern pop-culture trope, but the concept is often traced back to Billy Pilgrim’s conundrum from the Kurt Vonnegut novel Slaughterhouse-Five. First published in 1969, the book is etched in history as an essential read, but it’s not a novel that likely made every high school required reading list. A synopsis from Amazon:

Centering on the infamous firebombing of Dresden, Billy Pilgrim’s odyssey through time reflects the mythic journey of our own fractured lives as we search for meaning in what we fear most.

The Handmaid’s Tale by Margaret Atwood

Credit: @handmaidsonhulu / Instagram

Now a critically-acclaimed television seriesThe Handmaid’s Tale is Margaret Atwood’s novel of a dystopian world in which women are forced to live as concubines within a fundamentalist dictatorship. A synopsis from Goodreads:

Offred is a handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. She may leave the home of the Commander and his wife once a day to walk to food markets whose signs are now pictures instead of words because women are no longer allowed to read. She must lie on her back once a month and pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, because in an age of declining births, Offred and the other handmaids are valued only if their ovaries are viable. Offred can remember the years before, when she lived and made love with her husband, Luke; when she played with and protected her daughter; when she had a job, money of her own, and access to knowledge. But all of that is gone now…

Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostyoevski

Credit: Blincov / iStock

Fyodor Dostyoevski’s novel Crime and Punishment was first published in 12 monthly parts in 1886 and later collected into a single volume. The author’s second full-length novel after his exile to SiberiaCrime and Punishment is an examination of troubled human psychology in the face of moral dilemma. The book is considered a classic by any definition, but the dense, deep dive into the human psyche likely wasn’t part of primary and high school reading lists. A synopsis from Goodreads:

Raskolnikov, an impoverished student living in the St. Petersburg of the tsars, is determined to overreach his humanity and assert his untrammeled individual will. When he commits an act of murder and theft, he sets into motion a story that, for its excruciating suspense, its atmospheric vividness, and its depth of characterization and vision is almost unequaled in the literatures of the world.

Hell’s Angels by Hunter S. Thompson

Credit: @hunter_stockton_thompson / Instagram

Hunter S. Thompson made famous the gonzo style of journalism—subjective, biased reporting in which the reporter is often part of the story. Thompson’s novel Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas sits on many bookshelves alongside authors like Jack Kerouac or Ken Kesey, but it’s Hell’s Angels that stands apart as something uniquely gonzo-esque.

Hell’s Angels was Thompson’s first published novel, going to print in 1966, and it’s often cited as the work that defined the author’s style as well as his infamous persona. A synopsis from Goodreads:

In the mid-60s, Thompson spent almost two years living with the controversial Angels, cycling up & down the coast, reveling in the anarchic spirit of their clan, and, as befits their name, raising hell. His book successfully captures a singular moment in American history when the biker lifestyle was first defined and when such countercultural movements were electrifying and horrifying America.

Gravity’s Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon

Credit: @ambientkid1 / Instagram

Thomas Pynchon’s novel Gravity’s Rainbow made TIME Magazine’s list of the All-Time 100 Novels published since 1923, and it’s a book that often defies succinct definition. A synopsis from Amazon:

Winner of the 1973 National Book Award, “Gravity’s Rainbow” is a postmodern epic, a work as significant to the second half of the 20th century as Joyce’s “Ulysses” was to the first. Its sprawling, encyclopedic narrative and penetrating analysis of the impact of technology on society make it an intellectual tour de force.

School reading lists always skirt hidden gem classics

Credit: thomaguery / iStock

It seems like every year a new tally of banned books from school reading lists makes the news. The Catcher in the Rye is still praised and hated. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer gets edited and re-edited over and over. Fahrenheit 451 continues to turn up the heat in and out of classrooms. Skirting around classics for one reason or another is a timeless practice, and the novels listed above are only a few of the classics you may have missed during your high school literature class.

6 books you didn’t know were once banned

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIVIA GENIUS)

 

6 books you didn’t know were once banned

The best books are the ones whose messages and stories stick with us our entire lives. These books become central to our experience, and the manner in which they affect how we understand the world can make them seem essential.

However, the best books are also often the ones that challenge the status quo. And when society’s norms are challenged, society tends to fight back in one way – by trying to eliminate the thing which is challenging it. Here are six of the most influential books of the last century that you didn’t know were once banned.

Where the Wild Things Are

Credit: catwalker / Shutterstock.com

The whimsical story of the excitable young Max, who is sent to bed with no dinner after a rambunctious evening, Where the Wild Things Are has been loved by children since it was published in the early 1960s. However, the mischievous behavior of its main character and sometimes dark visuals and storytelling elements made it hard for Maurice Sendak to find a publisher.

Once the book was published, it was banned in some areas of the United States, mostly southern states, for being traumatizing for children due to Max’s inability to control his temper and his resultant punishment, as well as supposedly promoting witchcraft with its monstrous characters.

The Diary of Anne Frank

Credit: Anton_Ivanov / Shutterstock.com

The tragic (and true) story of an 11-year-old German girl and the trial she and her family endured while hiding from the Nazis during World War II was detailed in The Diary of Anne Frank. This book has helped introduce an entire generation to the horrors of conflict and the inspiration of hope. While the story takes place against a backdrop of unspeakable violence, it was not that violence that led to the book being banned in some parts of the United States.

The uncensored version of Anne Frank’s diary includes a brief passage regarding her thoughts on her changing body. The anatomical nature of these observations were deemed too graphic to be read by children and resulted in a short-lived ban of the book from some schools.

Animal Farm

Credit: taxzi / iStock

George Orwell’s celebrated allegorical tale about farm animals who take over the farm they live on in a communist-style revolution was not only taught in schools across the United States but was even promoted by the CIA. Of course, the greedy pigs who cause the eventual downfall of the farm had real-life inspirations, and as such, the leaders of communist countries such as the USSR and Cuba banned the book from being read in their respective countries.

To Kill A Mockingbird

Credit: Akhmad Dody Firmansyah / Shutterstock.com

Another book taught in schools across the country, To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, is a story that examines racial intolerance and the loss of innocence in a universally praised manner. However, the book was seventh on American Library Association’s 2017 list of the top 1o most challenged books in the United States. The language, meant to reproduce faithfully the dialect of a fractured south, is most often to blame when the book is challenged.

Brave New World

Credit: vchal / iStock

Aldous Huxley’s cautionary imagining of a London 500 years in the future where books are banned, has, ironically, been banned itself in many countries. Upon its release in 1932, it was banned entirely in Ireland for the antisocial behavior it examined. It was also removed from school libraries in America as recently as the 1980s for supposedly promoting promiscuous sex.

Harry Potter

Credit: Spinel_S / iStock

These popular books by J.K. Rowling about the adventures of a boy wizard remain some of the best-selling books in history but have been challenged by religious groups from the day they were released in 1997. While most readers and religious organizations interpret the instructions of spells and potions as an analogy for how young people learn and grow in the real world, accusations of witchcraft and Satanism led to the book’s being removed from some school libraries, albeit only for a short time in most cases.

Who wrote “The Catcher in the Rye”?

(This article is courtesy of trivia genius)

 

Who wrote “The Catcher in the Rye”?

Ernest Hemingway

11%

William Faulkner

10%

J. D. Salinger

71%

F. Scott Fitzgerald

8%
LEARN MORE
Published in 1951, The Catcher in the Rye was written by J. D. Salinger. While not widely praised after its publication, it has become an American classic, read widely in school classrooms across the United States and beyond. The novel follows 16-year-old Holden Caulfield through the days after he is expelled from school. After publishing what’s now his most famous work, Salinger became a recluse and refused to let the novel be adapted into a film or into a play.
Source: Britannica | Date Updated: June 4, 2019
Trivia Genius Logo

Keep learning with

3 Most prolific authors

In the publishing world, there is a case to made for a balance of quality and quantity. Readers should eagerly await the next release from their favorite author, thrilled with the volume they have just finished and ready for more. But they shouldn’t be made to wait too long, lest they lose interest altogether. Take, for example, ubiquitous checkstand-rack writers like John Grisham: Since the former lawyer released “A Time to Kill” (1989) and “The Firm” (1991), he has turned out a book a year for decades, putting him at more than 40 novels and counting.

Meanwhile, Russian-born American science-fiction author Isaac Asimov (1920-1992) is credited with more than 500 works, while R.L. Stein of “Goosebumps” fame for a time churned out one teen novel every two weeks while amassing more than $400 million in sales. Scare master Stephen King has written more than 60 full-length novels since 1973. These are all impressive bodies of work, but they pale in comparison to the true top-three most prolific scribes in history, listed in descending order below.

Barbara Cartland

Credit: catwalker/Shutterstock

Romance novel fans will immediately recognize the name of Barbara Cartland, but they may not realize how many books she actually wrote. The English novelist, whose true full name is Dame Mary Barbara Hamilton Cartland (1901-2000), was one of the most commercially successful writers in history. Cartland — some of whose most popular romances were turned into movies (“A Hazard of Hearts,” “A Ghost in Monte Carlo”, and more) — holds the Guinness World Record for most novels written in one year, an astounding 23 — nearly two per month. That type of output is what helped her reach a whopping 720-plus novels during her career. Most of those titles were in her specialty niche, Victorian-era romance. And in fact, even death didn’t totally slow her down, as several manuscripts surfaced and were published after she died.  Cartland is said to be the third best selling author in history, with an estimated 1 billion copies sold.

Charles Hamilton

If you were a young British lad around the turn of the last century, you probably were a fan of Billy Bunter. He was the protagonist of many serial magazine tales for boys, which were written under the name Frank Richards and detailed the trials, tribulations, and public-school exploits of Billy and his pals. Appearing in magazines for decades, Bunter was the most well-known character dreamed up by Charles Hamilton (1876-1961), who used Frank Richards among many other noms des plumes. In fact, because he wrote under so many names, it’s hard to determine exactly how prolific he actually was. His known attributable works alone, however, put Hamilton at the number two spot of all time. The London-born author started young and enjoyed a long life, during which he kept up his pace. The book gurus at the “B&N Reads” blog on the Barnes and Noble website note that historians estimate Hamilton wrote a total of around 100 million words. Dividing that word count by the length of an average novel, they figure he published the equivalent of nearly 1,200 full-length books.

Corín Tellado

Credit: Corin_Tellado_Cropped/Wikimedia commons

Working in a similar vein to her British counterpart Cartland, Spanish romance writer María del Socorro Tellado López (1927-2009) takes top honors for most prolific author of all time. She wrote a majority of her works under the name Corin Tellado, publishing more than 5,000 works in her lifetime, many of which were best-sellers in multiple Spanish-speaking countries. Due to potential censorship, however, Tellado may have had to work even harder than Cartland to keep readers coming back. Steamy scenes deemed acceptable in London, for example, would have been expunged by Spanish censors, so Tellado toned down the sexual exploits of her characters. Instead, she creatively alluded to their passions, keeping readers interested regardless of the somewhat tame content. According to the Barnes and Noble blog “B&N Reads,” more than 400 million of Tellado’s books have been sold to date.