4 Extinct Languages That Used to Be Widely Spoken

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TRIP TRIVIA)

 

4 Extinct Languages That Used to Be Widely Spoken

Countless factors facilitate the extinction of a language. A language becomes extinct when the members of the community who speak it are forced to integrate with larger populations. Through assimilation and the loss of cultural norms, these four languages fell out of the mouths of speakers, despite once being commonly heard around the world.

Coptic

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An extinct language that consisted of ancient Egyptian, Demotic, and Hieratic origins, Coptic was widely used in ancient Egypt after the spread of Greek culture to the region. This extinct language is considered the first language of Christianity, and scholars who specialize in theology often study it. Linguists agree that Coptic is similar to Late Egyptian, which was written with Egyptian hieroglyphs.

This ancient language existed as a literary-based language, so even in its most popular time, it was only written. The Coptic alphabet looks like a combination of hieroglyphs and Greek, probably because it borrowed letters from the Meroitic letters of the Demotic origin. Like most languages, Coptic is an example of the ever-evolving nuance of language. Though it is unspoken, the use of Coptic in liturgical practices, especially within the Greek Orthodox Church, is still going strong.

Biblical Hebrew

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An extinct language that laid the foundation for modern spoken Hebrew, Biblical Hebrew is no longer used in conversation. This ancient way of writing in Hebrew grew from the literary and biblical scholars at the height of its popularity – around 200 CE. Most ancient Israeli people spoke biblical Hebrew in daily conversation. However, the language is considered extinct because it is only taught within the construct of the Jewish faith as a way to understand the Jewish bible, the Torah.

The main difference between Biblical Hebrew and Modern Hebrew is the use of verb tenses. As Hebrew evolved from an ancient language to one in modern use, the need for the past, present, and future tenses arose. Earlier versions of ancient Hebrew had only two tenses – perfect and imperfect.

Sumerian

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A true ancient language, Sumerian was spoken in southern Mesopotamia long before the Greeks and Romans were jostling. As a culture, the Sumerians’ most widely accepted accolade is that they invented a system of writing. In fact, the first recorded example of written language comes from a group of texts dating from 3200 BCE written in ancient Sumerian.

Many linguists agree that the ancient language was an amalgamation of many different languages of the world, but the path of origin is not clear. What’s more, most archaeologists are not sure how or when the Sumerian-speaking people arrived in Mesopotamia, but one thing is for sure. The region served as a multicultural hub for a long time. However, there have not been any native Sumerian speakers in generations. This might be because of the decline of the Sumerian empire. As the people migrated north in search of lands for farming and lost their language to that of their new home, this made it one of the most famous extinct languages.

Akkadian

Credit: Viacheslav Lopatin / Shutterstock.com

Linguists assume that Akkadian developed out of Sumerian, since there are some linguistic connections in this extinct language. At its height, Akkadian was the language to speak in the entire world. Speakers ranged from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean Sea. It has only been in the last century that scholars have revitalized the language while uncovering ancient ruins.

Language extinction is both gradual and sudden. If a community is forced to forfeit its language due to political pressure or because there is not enough interest in it, it is going to become extinct. Many believe it is vital that the current languages spoken do not disappear entirely and that records are maintained for posterity.

Christmas Should Be Celebrated On October 6th Not On December 25th

Christmas Should Be Celebrated On October 6th Not On December 25th

 

Throughout my years of life here in a country (U.S.) that at least used to say they were a Christian Country there has been the debate about not only what year but also on what day Jesus was born in Bethlehem. First on the year, Jesus I believe was born in either the year 4 or the year 3 BC. and he lived for 33 years so he would have died in either the year 29 or 30 AD. By the customs of the time a man had to be at least 30 years old to be allowed to speak in the Synagogues and then Jesus taught for 3 years before he was killed. But this letter to you today is about the date in which He was born.

 

Historians and Scholars alike have made the very obvious observation that there was no way that the correct date was December 25th yet this is a date that the early Catholic Church in Rome set for a date. They believed that He was born on the winter saultus yet there is no Biblical information to back this up. There are a couple of things I would like for you to consider about His birth date. Most all of the Scholarly papers I have read throughout the years have stated that they believe that Jesus would have been born somewhere between March and October. A lot of their reasoning is/was because of the weather patterns in Israel that there would have been no Shepards out at night watching over their sheep simply because the weather would have been way too cold for that.

 

Please consider now the two reasons I have come to the October 6th date. One, it was the time of year where people from all over the Nation of Israel returned to the place of their birth to pay their taxes to the Romans. Most of the people only had crops to pay their taxes with, either directly with the crops or with the money they got from selling their crops. This would have required a fall date after the crops had come in. During the spring, summer or winter would not have made any sense because the vast majority of the people would have had nothing to pay the taxes with. A fall date is the only time of year that is at all logical. Now for the date of October 6th. The reason that I say that this date makes the most sense is because in the Hebrew calendar they believe that they have traced the time back to the date that Adam was created by God. That date is Saturday October 6th in the year 3760 BC. They believe that this was the first Sabbath. For those of you who read my material on this subject matter you know that I believe that Adam was the first human of the Royal Bloodline but that there were millions of men and women before him for at least hundreds of thousands of human years, just not of the Royal Bloodline. If the Jewish Scholars are correct about the October 6th date then it would make logical sense that this may well have been the date that Jesus was born into this world in the flesh, into this Royal Bloodline. This date would coincide well with the bounty of the crops so that people would be able to pay their taxes with their crops or the money from them.

 

This article is just something that I would like you to consider being it is obvious that the Catholic Church is and was wrong about the late December date. I was not given this exact date by some kind of Divine intervention, it is only my belief and now you know why I believe that this October date is a logical one. Besides, look what mankind has done to the December 25th date, it is now not much more than a commercial Holiday that is all about seeing how much money and misery that can be garnered from the populous, not about the birth of The King.

(Philosophy Poem) Stay Out Of Hell

(STAY OUT OF HELL)

 

Our Souls all came from the Light Above

The Fire Below is where we don’t want to be

Here on the Land we act as though we are free

We say what we will and we do what we want

We answer only to ourselves or maybe the Police

 

We work with our mind and hands ever how we choose

The History of Man is a history of O’ so many mistakes

Forbidden Fruit and listening to the Hissing of a Snake

We live our life as thought it is our own to take or keep

Life was given a Soul, with it, what is it that we have made

 

The last Plague in Egypt was saturated in the first borns blood

The Passover was never some form of random Angelic mistake

Life and Freedom have always never ever been free to partake

The Cross was drenched in The First Born’s Blood as it had to be

His Blood was required for us to be able to stay out of Hell you see

(Religious Flavored Poem) Now In It’s Time

Now In It’s Time

 

The Spirit of God speaks to the Soul

It is time to go for the Seed is in the womb

The Soul to the Seed now the heart beats

The Seed does swell and fills the womb

Now it is time to breathe and feel the Sun

 

The Soul is given within the Momma’s womb

The Soul is now designated a woman or man

First we crawl then we walk or run the trail of life

Now the Mind learns what the Soul already knows

Now it is time, responsibility is now our own

 

We grow, we learn, we live,  but in our own way

We see evil, we see good, now we do choose

Freedom of choice, this we all have within

Do we choose love, kindness, mercy, or no

How did we choose for now in it time we die

 

 

 

The Sixty Days Of Purim

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CHABAD.ORG)

 

This article will be something of a mixed-media piece. It’ll start with a “Purim Torah,” move on to more serious “Kabbalah” stuff, and conclude with an inspiring Chassidic teaching.

(A “Purim Torah” is what Torah scholars do for fun on Purim: a short exposition that sounds and feels like a typical piece of Talmud, yet is either patently absurd or just skewered enough to be taken seriously on Purim.)

First, the Purim Torah:

Question: We read in the Book of Esther how Hamandesired “to destroy, kill and annihilate all the Jews, from young to old, infants and woman, in a single day — on the 13th of the twelfth month, that is, the month of Adar” (Esther 3:13). But why was it so important to Haman that his evil decree be carried out “in a single day”? Would such a thing even have been logistically possible? Indeed, Haman initially cast lots to determine which month should be chosen as the time for the genocide of the Jews.1 Our sages tell us that when the lot fell on the month of Adar, Haman rejoiced: this was the month in which Moses had died (on Adar 7), surely a month that bodes ill for the Jews.2 Having hit on an apparently auspicious month for his plans, why did Haman continue with his lot-throwing to pinpoint a particular day?

Answer: Haman was a keen student of Jewish history. He knew that the Jewish calendar is dotted with festivals celebrating the Jewish people’s salvation from an enemy who sought to destroy them. What if — Haman worried — their G‑d saves them again? If I designate the month of Adar for their destruction, they’ll celebrate all month long!

Finale: In this, too, Haman’s plan was foiled. When Mordechai and Esther institutionalized the celebration of the Purim miracle, they ordained not only the Purim observances of Adar 14 and 15, but also the commemoration of “the month that was transformed for them from sorrow to joy, from mourning to festivity” (Esther 9:22). Hence the Talmudic ruling, “when the month of Adar enters, increase in joy” (Talmud, Taanit 26b).

Now for the Kabbalah:

There are two ways in which the Jewish Calendar, and the nature of Jewish time, can be understood:

a) The “Special Days” Approach: The annual cycle consists of hundreds of days, most of which are of the ordinary, run-of-the-mill variety. Thankfully, these are punctuated by a number of special days — festivals and holy days imbued with special spiritual qualities. We trudge through the ordinary days, inspired and encouraged by the fact that we’re never more than a few weeks away from a Passover or Purim, or — at the very least — a Lag BaOmer or a “New Year for Trees.”

b) The “Quality of the Month” Approach: Jewish time is comprised not of days but of months, each possessing a distinct spiritual essence. The “special” days of the year are simply days on which the particular month’s quality is more pronounced and actualized. Thus, Nissan is the “Month of Liberation,” while Passover (observed on Nissan 15 to 22) is a week-long period in Nissan during which the month’s freedom-quality is more accessible. Similarly, Sivan is the month of Wisdom, Shevat is the month of Growth and Fruitfulness, Elul is the month of Compassion, and so on. Each month has days in which the month’s quality rises to the surface and manifests itself more than on the month’s “ordinary” days; but these are differences of expression rather than of essence — essentially, each day of the month equally possesses the month’s unique spiritual properties. This is why many of the festivals and special dates of the Jewish calendar occur on the 15th of the month — the night of the full moon, representing the point at which the month’s essence is in its most revealed and luminous state.3

Adar is the month of Transformation. Adar transforms sorrow into joy, doubt into supra-knowledge, oblivion into exuberant being. Adar transforms a “scattered people” into a unified nation, and a moment of national weakness (when the Jewish people participated in Achashverosh‘s feast in the belief that allegiance to a mortal king will ensure their survival) into the greatest statement of Jewish commitment of all time (when for an entire year every single Jew remained faithful to his/her people and G‑d, even as a decree of annihilation hung over the head of every Jew in the world). Adar transforms the most physical of activities — eating and drinking — into an affirmation of our bond with G‑d.

So while two days in Adar — the 14th and the 15th of the month — are observed as “Purim,” these represent the apex of an entire month of joyous transformation and transformative joy.

Finally, here’s the inspiring chassidic thought we promised:

A month on the Jewish calendar includes either 29 or 30 days (reflecting the 29.5-day lunar cycle). But every two or three years — seven times in a 19-year cycle, to be exact — Adar doubles in size: on these “pregnant years,” as they’re called, there’s a 30-day “Adar I” followed by a 29-day “Adar II.” In addition, 30th of Shevat is also the first of Adar I’s Rosh Chodesh (“head of the month”) days. This makes for a total of 60 “Adar days.”

The Lubavitcher Rebbe points out that the number “60” represents the power of transformation. A rule-of-thumb in Torah law is the “nullified by sixty” principle. For example, if a piece of non-kosher food accidentally falls into a pot of kosher food, the undesirable element is “nullified” if the desirable element is sixty times greater than it.

Thus, the Rebbe concludes, in a year blessed with a double, 60-day Adar, all undesirable elements — every and any cause for pain, sadness, discouragement or dejection — are nullified and sublimated by the transformative joy of Adar.

10 Sivan Facts That Every Jew Should Know

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CHABAD.ORG)

 

1. Sivan is the 3rd Month on the Jewish Calendar

Counting from the springtime month of Nisan, Sivan is the third month on the calendar. Conversely, counting from the month of Tishrei (Rosh Hashanah) in the fall, it is month number nine.

Read: Our Other Head

2. Sivan Is First Mentioned by Name in the Book of Esther

Like the other contemporary Hebrew names of the months, Sivan originated during the Babylonian exile.1 Thus, we first encounter it in the Book of Esther when we read of a royal communication allowing the Jews to defend themselves against their enemies which was issued on the 23rd day of “the third month, which is the month of Sivan.”2

Read: The Basic Purim Story

3. It’s When We Were Given the Torah at Sinai

On the first day of the third month after the Exodus, our ancestors arrived at Mount Sinai.3Six days later, G‑d descended upon the mountain and communicated the 10 Commandments. The timing was exquisite. The Torah contains three parts (Torah, Prophets, and Writings), the Jewish nation has three tiers (KohenLevite, and Israelite), Moses was the third child (following Miriam and Aaron), and it was the third day since G‑d had commanded that men and women separate in anticipation of the great event.4

Read: What Happened at Matan Torah?

4. Shavuot Is Celebrated in Sivan

We celebrate Shavuot, the anniversary of the revelation at Sinai, on Sivan 6 (as well as Sivan 7 in the diaspora), 50 days after we commemorate the anniversary of the Exodus on Passover. Some special features of Shavuot include: learning Torah all nighthearing the 10 Commandments in the synagoguedelicious dairy meals, and Yizkor memorial.

Read: What Is Shavuot?

5. Wheat Is Harvested in Sivan

In Israel, crops grow through the rainy winter season. By Sivan, they’re ready for harvesting. In ancient times, two wheat loaves, made from fresh grain, were offered in the Holy Temple on Shavuot. It was also at this time that people would begin to bring bikkurim, their first and choicest fruits and grains, to thank G‑d for Israel’s bounty.

Read: Shtei Halechem: The Two Breads

6. The Zodiac of Sivan Is Gemini (Twins)

Following Aries (ram) and Taurus (ox), the Gemini (twins, te’omim in Hebrew) is the first zodiac sign that is a human (the only other is Virgo, the virgin). The sages explain that this is appropriate for the month when we received the Torah, as only a human can extoll, clap, and dance with joy over this momentous event.5

Watch: Do Jews Believe in Zodiac?

7. Sivan Is Associated With Jacob

The third month is a composite of the first two months, distilling and combining their qualities. Thus it is connected to Jacob, who perfected and synthesized the unique paths of Abraham and Isaac who preceded him. And of course, Jacob was a twin to Esau, who took the following two months, Tammuz and Av, associated with the destruction of both holy Temples. 6

Read: Jacob of the Bible

8. Some People Fast and Mourn on 20 Sivan

Over the years, several tragedies have befallen the Jewish people during the month of Sivan. In 1096, during the first days of the month, mobs of frenzied crusaders murdered Jews in Worms, Maintz, and other Rhinish cities. Following the 1171 massacre of the Jews of Blois, France, who had been falsely accused of murdering a Christian child, Rabbenu Tam declared 20 Sivan a fast day. This was reinforced after thousands of German Jews were butchered during the 1289 Rindfleisch massacre at the same time of year. In time, this day became a memorial for victims of the 1648 Cossack riots (tach vetat), many of whom met their deaths at this time of year. Today, this fast is only observed by some Chassidic communities.

Read: The Martyrs of Blois

9. The Month Begins With an Element of Mourning

Each new month is announced and blessed in shul on Shabbat Mevarchim, the Shabbat before Rosh Chodesh. Because it is a joyous day, we omit the Av Harachamim prayer for the millions of Jewish martyrs who gave their lives to sanctify G‑d’s name. According to Chabad custom, on the Shabbat preceding the month of Sivan we say this prayer as usual, in deference to the bloody history of the season.

Read: Shabbat Mevarchim

10. The Rebbe Came to America in Sivan

After narrowly escaping the Nazi onslaught in France, the Lubavitcher Rebbe, Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson (1902-1994), and his wife, Rebbetzin Chaya Mushka Schneerson (1901-1988), arrived in the United States of America on Sivan 28 in the year 5701 (1941).

Thus began the Rebbe’s decades-long revolutionary work to revitalize Jewish life in the West and across the globe.

Read: What the Rebbe’s Arrival in America Means to Me

FOOTNOTES
1.

Jerusalem Talmud, Rosh Hashanah 1:2.

3.

Exodus 19:1 and Rashi ad loc.

4.

Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat 88a.

5.

Pesikta Rabbati 20.

6.

Zohar II 78b.

Who Was Nathan The Prophet?

(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF CHABAD.ORG)

 

Nathan (c. 880-790 BCE1 ) was a prominent prophet during the reign of King David and King Solomon. According to tradition, Nathan studied in an elite academy of mystics2 under the tutelage of the prophet Samuel.3 Although no book in the Biblical Canon is associated with his name, the Talmud tells us that Nathan concluded the writing of the book of Samuel.4

Nathan Rebukes David

Nathan first gains fame in the Biblical account, in the heat of the great debacle of David and Batsheba. King David had cohabited with Bathsheba after observing her beauty from the palace rooftop and was severely reprimanded by G‑d for doing so.5

Nathan delivered G‑d’s rebuke by opening the conversation with a parallel. “There were two men,” said Nathan, “one rich and one poor. The rich man had very many sheep and cattle, and the poor man had nothing but one small ewe which he had bought. He cared for it, and it grew up [under his care] along with his children. It ate from his bread, drank from his cup, and slept in his bosom. It was a daughter to him.”

Nathan continued. “Then a guest came to the rich man. The wealthy host was too miserly to take any of his own sheep or cattle to prepare for the guest who had come to him. [Instead,] he took the poor man’s ewe and prepared it for the guest who had come to him.”

King David was outraged by the arrogance and impudence of the rich man, and declared, “As G‑d lives, the man who did this deserves to die! He shall pay fourfold for the ewe, since he did this and had no pity!”

By issuing a verdict in the case set before him, David had unwittingly set the rules for his own prosecution and conviction.6

Nathan responded and said, “You are the man! . . . Why have you treated G‑d’s word with contempt, doing evil in My sight? You cut down Uriah (Bathsheba’s husband) with a sword and took his wife as your wife! . . . I will raise evil against you from your own house . . . I will do this in the sight of Israel, in the open!”

When David recognized the scope of his sin, admitted his guilt and repented for his actions, Nathan conveyed G‑d’s message that He had accepted his atonement.7

Nathan was thus instrumental in restoring King David’s dignity (allowing him to “raise his head”) in the aftermath of this sin. Having been informed of G‑d’s forgiveness by Nathan, David remarked, “Instead of my beheading, you have raised my head.”8

Prophecy Regarding Building the Temple

When quiet finally reigned in the land of Israel, after King David subdued the enemies of Jews through many bloody battles, he sought the counsel of Nathan with respect to building a sanctuary for G‑d, a Holy Temple. Despite his initial nod, Nathan was informed by prophecy that King David was ineligible to erect the House of G‑d, which was to be a house of peace. King David, he was told,9 whose sword smote the enemies of the Jewish people, would be unsuitable to construct the Temple.10 Instead, his son, King Solomon will build the Temple.11

Through his prophetic vision, Nathan helped design the configuration of the Temple’s floorplan as well as develop the appropriate activities performed therein. The verse states:

“[King Hizkiyah] also stationed the Levites in G‑d’s Temple with cymbals, and harps and Iyres, as commanded by David, Gad the king’s seer, and Nathan the prophet, for this was the commandment of G‑d through his prophets.”12

The Appointment of King Solomon

As the reign of King David was winding down and David took ill, the race was on for a successor to the throne. David’s son, Adoniyahu put forward his candidacy and as the prospect of his nomination appeared to gain traction, a growing number of royal dignitaries declared him king.13

But David had already sworn to Bathsheba that her son Solomon would inherit the throne.14

Nathan proceeded to inform Bathsheba of the development and together they coordinated their appearance before the king.15 When David heard the news he swore, saying: “By the Living G‑d . . . I swore to you by G‑d, L‑rd of Israel: ‘Your son Solomon will reign after me and he will sit on my throne after me,’ and I will fulfill [my vow] today!”16

David then proceeded to have Solomon coronated in public view, by the agency of Nathan, Zadok the high priest, Benayahu ben Yehoyada and many other dignitaries.17

Nathan remained one of the closest confidants of King Solomon. The Midrash teaches that two honorary seats flanked the throne of King Solomon, one for Gad the Seer and the other for Nathan the prophet.18

FOOTNOTES
1.

See Shalshelet Ha-Kabalah p. 98b, cited in Seder Ha-Dorot, s.v. 2935 that Nathan’s lifespan was 94 years.

2.

See I Samuel 10:5. Radak, ibid.

3.

See R. Yehuda Ha-Levi Lifshitz, Dor Yesharim (Piotrkow, 1908) vol. II, p. 10.

4.

Bava Batra 15a.

6.

R. Israel Ba’al Shem Tov, cited in Likutei Maharankama, 113. See also the Lubavitcher Rebbe’s exposition of this teaching in Likutei Sichot, vol. IV, p. 1208 where this is understood as a testimony to the transcendence of the divine soul vested within a Jewish person, insofar as no force of nature or spirit can assert control over his destiny, unless he himself has granted that force the authority to do so, abdicating his state of transcendence above the natural order.

7.

II Shmuel, 12:13-14.

8.

Pesikta d’Rav Kahana II, Parshat Ki Sisa, 1. Midrash Tanchuma, ibid, 3.

9.

I Chronicles 22:7-8. Radak, ibid.

10.

Much like the prohibition against using metal instruments to carve the stones of the altar in the Temple (Metzudat David, I Chronicles 22:8).

Radak (ibid) adds that David also orchestrated the death of Uriah, husband of Bathsheba (See II Samuel 11:15-17). In addition, the tragic slaughtering of 85 kohanim(priests) of the city of Nob (I Samuel 22:22) by the instruction of King Saul, was an inadvertent result of David’s actions. In lamentation, David stated, “I knew that day, when Doeg the Edomite was there, that he surely told Saul. I have caused the death of your clan.”

With respect to casualties of war, the Midrash (Bereishit Rabbah 63:8) states that David’s actions were sanctioned by the Sanhedrin. See also, Kli Yakar (R. Shmuel Laniado, II Shmuel 2:7 p. 133). Yachin Uvoaz-Zera Rav, p. 126. Ezrat Kohanim, p. 48.

11.

I Chronicles ibid. 9.

13.

See I Melachim, 1:5-7. Ibid, 25.

14.

Ibid., 17 and Abarbanel. See Radak, II Shmuel, 12:24who explains that Bathsheba initially refused to bear another child with king David, fearing that he would be taunted for his being of tainted lineage. David assured her that he had been informed by the prophet of G‑d that the first son that would be born to her would inherit the throne.

A commentary attributed to Rabbi Yehuda Ha-Chassid (Pirushei Ha-Torah l’Rebi Yehudah Ha-Chassidhaftorahof parashat Chayei Sarah, cited in Chumash Otzar Ha-Rishonim) presents an alternative narrative. After Solomon was born, Nathan had informed David that Solomon would reign, which prompted David to seek qualified teachers to prepare Solomon for the position. When his mother, Bathsheba, protested saying that she feared that he would be slain by his older brothers such as Abashalom, Adoniyahu and Amnon, David swore that he would ensure his ascent to the throne. He then enlisted Nathan, Tzadok (the high priest), Benayahu ben Yehoyada (the chief commander of the military) to train Solomon in various fields, and an entire corps of guardians to provide physical protection for Solomon.

I am grateful to Rabbi Joseph Asia (publisher of Chumash Otzar Ha-Rishonim) for sharing the original source with me.

18.

Midrash Abba Gurion, 1.

(Poem) So You Saw The Face Of God You Say

So You Saw The Face Of God You Say

 

Though you were but a young child

People still believed what you did say

You swear you saw the Trinity of God

The Holy Spirit, The Father and The Son

From the sky with Golden gifts to you

 

People beaten down will grasp at anything

You say you lost the gift only your family seen

What you say the Scriptures don’t say the same

Are you as ignorant of the Scriptures as you seem

You had to put the Bible away to say your play

 

You say your greater than Moses, the friend of God

Your a Prophet of what as you stash the Bible away

Only the ignorant or a fraud would say the things you say

You and your family wrote your own Evil into play

No human has ever seen the face of The Father

But when you do you’ll pay, for you Hell’s Fire awaits

(From Scripture: Poem) Slapping My Donkey

Slapping My Donkey
(The idea for this poem came from the Book of Numbers in the Old Testament Chapter #22)

 

Today I ride my Donkey

With honor my word is sought

My Donkey she is my favorite ride

For years faithful she has been

To disobey me she has never tried

 

Toward promised riches I point her head

The path I choose she always will go

Yet today three times she disobeyed

She crushed my foot against the stones

If I had a sword she would now be dead

 

She opened her mouth and spoke to me

An Angel had opened her mouth and eyes

But in my arrogance and temper I did not see

The Angel of The Lord with sword in hand

My Donkey saved me from my bloody end

(Philosophy Poem) The Lord’s Path To Walk

The Lord’s Path To Walk

 

If you walk with The Lord fear not the path you tread

Like the Perfect Doctor He always protects and saves

The wise do not have the wisdom of their own Creator

A sensible person clings to His laws as Divine Oracles

Guard yourself with His Light upon your feet and heart

 

Know what you will say before your words are formed

There is a time that all should stay quiet and to listen

Draw upon your G-d given wisdom when your speaking

The heart of the fool walks within the prints of a Dragon

If our friend mocks the path you walk he is indeed no friend

 

In the days of our life do we make one more important than others

Do we not all along with the Earth rotate around the same Sun

In The Lord’s wisdom each day and each season is appointed to us

We were all made of dust and to it we shall all surely return again

Follow The Lord’s path and His words for they are exalted and blessed

 

Do not give power over your Soul to anyone else for our Creator owns us

All of the Lords works is in pairs of two like a coin with two sides two faces

The wise listen and obey their Master’s voice but the fool walks in darkness

Excel in your daily walk with The Lord, put no undue strain upon your honor

We shall all receive our due inheritance from the life that we choose to walk

 

 

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