Brexit: In The UK, Just like In The U.S. The Vote Of The People Means Nothing?


(THIS ARTICLE IS COURTESY OF TIME MAGAZINE)

UNITED KINGDOM

What to Know About the Brexit Ruling Against the U.K. Government

BRITAIN-EU-POLITICS-COURT-BREXIT
Niklas Halle’n—AFP/Getty ImagesGina Miller, co-founder of investment fund SCM Private and the lead claimant in the case, reads a statement outside the High Court in central London after winning the legal challenge that Article 50 cannot be triggered without a decision by parliament, on November 3, 2016. The High Court in London ruled on Thursday that parliament, not the government, must approve the start of Britain’s withdrawal from the European Union, in a landmark decision that could delay Brexit.

High Court decision has thrown a wrench in the gears of Theresa May’s government

The United Kingdom’s High Court ruled on Thursday the British government must receive approval from parliament to begin the process of withdrawal from the European Union, a move that could significantly disrupt the progress of so-called ‘Brexit.’

The ruling comes as a bitter blow to the government of Prime Minister Theresa May, which had argued the triggering of the mechanism that puts Brexit into motion did not need to be approved by lawmakers. Lawyers for the government will now appeal the ruling in the U.K.’s Supreme Court.

Here’s a quick guide to the biggest obstacle yet placed in Brexit’s path:

Does this mean Brexit is doomed?

No. The ruling merely makes it harder for the government to trigger ‘Article 50,’ the section of the relevant E.U. treaty that allows for countries to leave the 28-nation bloc. May said in October that the government would notify the E.U. of Article 50 before the end of March next year, formally starting a two-year process of leaving. This ruling throws that timeline into doubt, and threatens to undermine May’s negotiating position with E.U. leaders over the terms of departure.

What was the nature of the legal challenge?

The British government had argued that Article 50 could be triggered under the so-called “royal prerogative,” by which it has exercised executive power on issues of foreign policy for centuries.

Lawyers for the anti-Brexit campaigners who brought the case argued that, since withdrawing from the E.U. would affect their domestic legal rights, the royal prerogative should not apply, and lawmakers in parliament should be asked for approval.

The court sided with the plaintiffs, concluding that the government “does not have power under the Crown’s prerogative to give notice pursuant to Article 50 of the [E.U. treaty] for the United Kingdom to withdraw from the European Union.”

So now MP’s will get to vote on Brexit?

Yes, if the ruling survives the appeal process. The Supreme Court will rule on the government’s appeal in early December. If that fails, the government could escalate its appeal to the European Court of Justice—but that would be a supremely ironic move, given Britain is currently seeking to escape its jurisdiction. If the Supreme Court ruling goes against the government, May will face enormous pressure to drop the challenge and give parliament a vote.

How will lawmakers vote?

That’s an interesting question. In the buildup to the E.U. referendum, a large majority of members of parliament (MPs) across the various parties were in the ‘Remain’ camp. If the parliamentary vote had been held before the referendum, it undoubtedly would have been in favor of staying in.

But the public has now spoken, and MPs will be under pressure to reflect the will of their constituents as opposed to what they personally feel about Brexit. This is especially the case for the opposition Labour Party, whose constituencies voted 70-30 to leave the European Union in spite of the party’s near-unanimous support for ‘Remain.’

Lawmakers could, however, use a requirement for a vote to pressure the government to seek a “softer” Brexit—maintaining access to the European single market, for example, or even allowing free movement across borders. This would certainly undermine the position of the Conservative government, which wants a clean, sharp break from the economic and political bloc.

What’s the reaction been like to the ruling?

The government issued a terse statement saying it would appeal the ruling. Elsewhere, it has provoked sharply different reactions from ‘Remainers’ and ‘Leavers.’ Nigel Farage, leader of the United Kingdom Independence Party, warned on Twitter the ruling would open the door to a “betrayal” of the popular vote:

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